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  1. #1
    Lamar Bruce's Avatar
    Lamar Bruce Guest

    Default Residential water pressure.

    Have found residential water pressure-reducing regulators that allow house water pressure to climb to street pressure when no water is being used. Is this true for some regulators or should all regulators hold reduced pressure when water flow stops? Thanks for your help.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    The whole reason for pressure reducing regulators is to keep the pressure below 80 psi (or whatever the setting.) It is not normal to creep up and IF it is the regulator, it should be replaced.
    That said, how do you know it is the regulator and not thermal expansion from the w/h?
    I would note what you saw and let a professional plumber sort out what the cause and solution is for the problem.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Luttrall View Post
    The whole reason for pressure reducing regulators is to keep the pressure below 80 psi (or whatever the setting.) It is not normal to creep up and IF it is the regulator, it should be replaced.
    That said, how do you know it is the regulator and not thermal expansion from the w/h?
    I would note what you saw and let a professional plumber sort out what the cause and solution is for the problem.
    Jim. brings up a good point about thermal expansion. If you find a home with a PRV on the main line, you should also find an expansion tank or expansion relief valve.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Anyone have a good method of checking water gauge calibration?

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    I check it at my own house. That is a known pressure, at least theoretically. I also tend to replace the gauge every year or so because I am so hard on them.

    Department of Redundancy Department
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    My newest replacement gauge reads about 10 psi off from my two existing guages. Normally, I would just accept a new one as the most accurate, but since both existing ones read the same and the new one is the odd man out, it just makes me think...
    Just one drop on a hard surface is all it takes to kill one. I use a watts gauge now, any better (more durable) ones out there?

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Just curious.... how often are you guys finding pressure problems?

    Is it more often over due to a bad regulator or somthing?

    Or, is it more common to find it under due to crappy old galvanized plumbing?

    This thread caught my eye because I just had a lady call and yell at me because her pressure was 110psi and she thinks I should have told her.

    It's not in our SoP anywhere to use a gauge and I never have.


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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    I inspect in mostly newer areas that have been adding water towers or upgrading old ones and it is very common to see pressure over 80 psi with no PRV. Since I always test exterior frost proof hose bibs under pressure for leakage inside the wall, a pressure gauge is the simple solution which also tells me if there is a pressure issue. I don't worry about minimum SOP since I typically meet or exceed without trying.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Jim Luttrall vbmenu_register("postmenu_58770", true);
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    Re: Residential water pressure.
    Anyone have a good method of checking water gauge calibration?
    Find a system with a volume tank, measure the pressure with a tire gauge at the top of the tank, should match the pressure of your gauge.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    Just curious.... how often are you guys finding pressure problems?

    Is it more often over due to a bad regulator or somthing?

    Or, is it more common to find it under due to crappy old galvanized plumbing?

    This thread caught my eye because I just had a lady call and yell at me because her pressure was 110psi and she thinks I should have told her.
    Yes, you should have told her. At 110psi the system is not operating properly. Needs to be between 40psi & 80psi.

    It's not in our SoP anywhere to use a gauge and I never have.
    SOP's do not tell you what tools to use!

    A good reason and example of how just following an SOP can not always be the best thing to do. Not knowing what SOP you are following, I would bet that high/low water pressure is covered under on of your SOP's sections.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson View Post
    Not knowing what SOP you are following, I would bet that high/low water pressure is covered under on of your SOP's sections.
    Scott,

    The ASHI SoP does not cover it.

    Plumbing system | ASHI, American Society of Home Inspectors



    That said, yes, I agree, an HI 'should' check the pressure of the water supply.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    You guys are funny....

    I didn't say I only do everything to the minimum standard of my state's SoP.

    I just don't use a pressure gauge. The person that taught me the business 10 years ago didn't... and, over the last 10 years, my company has done over 10,000 inspections and this is the first I've heard of it. So, I don't think I'm exactly missing the boat.

    I love how everyone's so quick to just label somebody as doing a poor job because of one fleeting comment. You gotta love the internet....


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    You guys are funny....

    I didn't say I only do everything to the minimum standard of my state's SoP.
    Matt,

    You did say, though, that "It's not in our SoP ... " and that was taken as you meaning it was not something you had to do, or should have done. That is a logical extension of your statement.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    Just It's not in our SoP anywhere to use a gauge and I never have.
    Had you not mentioned that your SoP does not require it, I suspect the responses would have been explaining why you should be taking measuring the pressure.

    I have to admit that I did not take pressures "all the time", just "much of the time". Many of my inspections were done in subdivisions where I went through and did most houses on that subdivision, checking the pressure on the few few gave me the typical pressure in that subdivision. Either it was a problem or it was not (most were not).

    The problem with 110 psi is that the plumbing system is much more susceptible to leaks and failure due to the higher stress being placed on the piping.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  14. #14
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    Cool Re: Residential water pressure.

    This is another example of how an Assn. SOP may leave your butt hanging in the breeze.

    Legally, you may eventually get off the hook but at what price?

    This is a simple test that takes a moment. What are the hazards of high pressure? The more common victims of high water pressure are washing machine hoses and water inlet valves on dishwashers and washing machines. Now, if you start at 110 psi and someone slams a valve closed quickly, the water hammer can exceed 200 psi, which is more than enough to burst pipes.

    I see this as cheap insurance.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Residential water pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    You guys are funny....

    I didn't say I only do everything to the minimum standard of my state's SoP.

    I just don't use a pressure gauge. The person that taught me the business 10 years ago didn't... and, over the last 10 years, my company has done over 10,000 inspections and this is the first I've heard of it. So, I don't think I'm exactly missing the boat.

    I love how everyone's so quick to just label somebody as doing a poor job because of one fleeting comment. You gotta love the internet....
    Hey Matt,

    It was not my intent disparage the quality of work that you do, only you and your clients can do this. I was just offering a comment that might help others see the need to exceed all SOP's.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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