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  1. #1
    Don Parda's Avatar
    Don Parda Guest

    Default Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    Should I accept the drip edge that makes a simple bend down along the fascia or insist on the drip edge (might be called a D flashing?) that projects out about 1" and then comes back to bend down along the fascia? Because my understanding is the back of the gutter slips between the fascia and the drip edge, is a steel drip edge acceptable (dissimilar metals corrosion) with aluminum gutters? Does aluminum flashing require aluminum nails, or are galvanized nails acceptable? Do aluminum gutters require aluminum fasteners and hangers, or are galvanized fasteners and hangers acceptable?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Default Re: Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Parda View Post
    Should I accept the drip edge that makes a simple bend down along the fascia or insist on the drip edge (might be called a D flashing?) that projects out about 1" and then comes back to bend down along the fascia? Because my understanding is the back of the gutter slips between the fascia and the drip edge, is a steel drip edge acceptable (dissimilar metals corrosion) with aluminum gutters? Does aluminum flashing require aluminum nails, or are galvanized nails acceptable? Do aluminum gutters require aluminum fasteners and hangers, or are galvanized fasteners and hangers acceptable?
    All I can say is this - You can insist on anything you want. It's your house and your money.

    I see a lot of roofs in the Pacific NW and never see a problem with galvanic action on dissimilar metals. In the old days, roofers used hot-dipped galvanized steel nails and there was never a rusted nail head to be seen. Now, all nails are driven by airguns, they are electroplated, and will go rusty in 3 months. Where they are not exposed it is no problem.

    You are lucky to be getting drip edge of any kind. The simple bend is fine for along the eave. The other makes a nicer edge for the gable end (rake). The steel flashing is standard and comes with an enamel paint finish. The gutters are also painted.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    mike huntzinger's Avatar
    mike huntzinger Guest

    Default Re: Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    last night on This Old House, they showed how to use the drip edge with several other products too,


  4. #4
    Don Parda's Avatar
    Don Parda Guest

    Default Re: Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    Thanks.
    Sounds like dissimilar metals don't present a problem in this application and the choice of drip edge is not critical.


  5. #5
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
    Darrel Hood Guest

    Default Re: Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    The simple drip edge is intended for use when a 1x2 trim is installed on the fascia. The 1x2 will support the shingle edges adequately. The use of the T drip edge with the 1x2 will curl the edge of the shingles slightly upward. It isn't a disastrous situation, but it's not right. If gutters are desired, IMO the best setup is the T drip edge without the 1x2.


  6. #6
    Don Parda's Avatar
    Don Parda Guest

    Default Re: Drip Edge/Gutter Details

    Thanks. Makes sense.

    I've learned of another type of drip edge that seems to make sense. It's called a gutter apron drip edge flashing. There is a single bend to a bit more than 90 degrees.


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