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  1. #1
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    Default Cut through Joist Repair

    Last edited by Gina Wu; 03-25-2013 at 05:34 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    If there is enough room you can just run a new joist along the side of the cut one and be done with it.

    Otherwise, you are probably looking at a fix and you probably can get one from the joist manufacturer and you will need to provide some info such as joist span, o.c. spacing, they'll let you know what they need.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Try to find out who cut it. Builder, General contractor or Plumber send them the photos and ask them for a remedy.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Gina Wu View Post
    "If there is enough room you can just run a new joist along the side of the cut one and be done with it."

    Is this the same as sistering a joist?

    Thanks

    Yes, it is the same.

    Billy makes a good point too, especially if this was done recently.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    I like Billy's answer, but you may have to wait until the cows come home.

    It's difficult to assess the complete condition from a few photos; there may be something relevant that can effect what is going on. Perhaps someone that is capable of advising you should look at it.

    In my opinion (I may get shot for this), sistering the cut section(s) may work. It's hard to tell, but the beams look 12" on center. It so, that is even better.

    If you have to pack it out to pass the drain, so be it. You could sister it with wood or a steel plate. (or 2 plates). I would also (slightly jack up the cuts, so after you sister it and remove the jacks, it will have tension on it and not drop more.

    Don't be cheap with the sisters; the longer; the better.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Stephens View Post
    Try to find out who cut it. Builder, General contractor or Plumber send them the photos and ask them for a remedy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Turetsky View Post
    I like Billy's answer, but you may have to wait until the cows come home..
    Send them all an email / letter.
    *one of them will point you in the right direction.

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    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Thanks very much for all the advices.
    But asking for help from builder or contractor may not be an option now for this was done a few years ago. I will definitely give a try.

    At the same time it seems sistering may be a good idea. When you sister a joist, do the two pieces need to be bonded tight together? I am confused with this part, since the drain size is bigger than the joist.

    I am very interested in steven's way of doing it. Here "the beams look 12" on center" is for the distance between joist or the up down size of the joist? And also what does "you have to pack it out to pass the drain" mean? I think this may be very close to what I want to know from this post.

    Last edited by Gina Wu; 11-04-2012 at 08:10 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Gina,

    I repeat; someone who knows what they are doing should look at your job. Remember, I can't see the whole thing and may be missing something.

    But in my opinion; although it is wrong (and I would never let anyone cut a beam unless there was no other way); I have seen worse. If you fix it and make sure it is stable I believe it will outlast all of us.

    12" refers to the distance between the beams (center to center).

    Yes, the sistered beams must be tight to each other (bolts with correct sized holes), which is what the "padding" refers to. Add pieces onto the cut beams so a full beam can run past the pipe.

    If possible, I would sister both sides of the beam/pipe. If you do it that way and attach it correctly, it will be very strong.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    By 'pack it out' I think he means add shims until the sister will clear the pipe.

    An alternate way is to 1) trim those jagged ends square. Those looks like chainsaw cuts, BTW.
    2) Install a header across which joins the cut joist to the joist on either side. The header goes at right angles to the cut joist and touches a good joist at either end.
    3) Do the same on the other side of the pipe, forming a box around the pipe.
    4) Use joist hangers to connect everything.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    I looked a bit closer and see that the beams are engineered (like a wooden I beam). So I may adjust what I previously recommended. Please post a picture of the white pipe from floor to underside of the beam.

    Steven Turetsky, UID #16000002314
    homeinspectionsnewyork.com
    eifsinspectionsnewyork.com

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Gina,

    I refer to sistering a joist as a new joist that runs the same span (length, distance) as the one you are putting it next to, bearing point to bearing point. In most cases, you would glue and screw the two together, but you have TJIís which are bit different. If you have the room, you can slide a new one in and get it as close as possible and probably be done with it. However, you have to secure it somehow, and I donít think nailing it from above is an option. So, in this case, you would put in some spacers, to clear the pipe, then glue and screw the two together, you want this done to keep the new joist from making lateral movements (racking).

    If you want to bridge the cut joist section with lumber or steel plates, that is what I call a fix/repair, and usually from the supplier, manufacturer, or engineer.

    I thought of the header idea too, but usually you need double joists on each side and a bunch of fill materials and hangers. Without knowing the loads on the floor canít say if this would work, but is an option.

    Like Steven said, you probably want someone to look at this and/or do the work, but it doesnít hurt to know what to look for when the work is being done.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Turetsky View Post
    I looked a bit closer and see that the beams are engineered (like a wooden I beam). So I may adjust what I previously recommended. Please post a picture of the white pipe from floor to underside of the beam.
    Thanks for clearing the confusion. Now i understood the situation much better. And also this is an engineered joist. Does this mean a lot difference?


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Cut through Joist Repair

    It is wonderful to receive so much feedback for this trouble. I think both of the sistering and the box idea may work for this one. And we will find a guy to come in give a check. I just wonder if it is better to consult an engineer. And also about how much the cost will be to fix this problem?

    Thanks


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