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  1. #1
    Scott Wilkes's Avatar
    Scott Wilkes Guest

    Default Question regarding new service panel off of flush mounted main panel

    I am just a homeowner and do not intend to do the actual wiring. I will get an electrician to do that. But, I wanted to prepare the hardware for the wire installation. I have a new home that we just moved in to. It only has two open breaker slots on the bottom left. In talking with the electrical, he says that he can put a 60 amp breaker in there and run to a new surface mounted service panel (sub-panel). I can easily install the new service panel on a piece of plywood, attached to the studs, but my question is, what is the cleanest way to come out of the bottom of the main panel? I don't want conduit just sticking out of the drywall and would prefer not to have to open up the drywall below the main panel if I don't have to. Is there a way to mount a junction box below the main panel, with an opening on the wall mounted side, through the sheetrock, so that he can run the new wire? I would be running conduit from the junction box to the new service panel. If anyone has done this or has pictures of how to cleanly install this type of effort, I would greatly appreciate you sharing this with me. I want to make sure that my pre-installation efforts meet code. The electrician will be pulling a permit for the installation and it will be rough and final inspected by the city. Thank you for any help you may be able to give.


    Scott

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,600

    Default Re: Question regarding new service panel off of flush mounted main panel

    Best let an experienced electrician do it the best way he knows.
    In a brand new house, why wouldn't he mount the extra panel front flush with the drywall?
    There are limits to how low the breakers should be. He may need to place the new panel beside the existing one for clearance and access reasons. Then there is a small rectangle of drywall between the panels. Let him cut that out so he can make safe connections.

    Then when all done with the wiring, you fasten with drywall screws a few paint stir sticks or cleats, behind the drywall to support the cutout piece, screw that in flush, mud, sand, paint.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    591

    Default Re: Question regarding new service panel off of flush mounted main panel

    What brand of panel is it? You might be able to install some tandem breakers to free up breaker space and avoid adding the additional panel.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
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    99

    Default Re: Question regarding new service panel off of flush mounted main panel

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Best let an experienced electrician do it the best way he knows.
    In a brand new house, why wouldn't he mount the extra panel front flush with the drywall?
    There are limits to how low the breakers should be. He may need to place the new panel beside the existing one for clearance and access reasons. Then there is a small rectangle of drywall between the panels. Let him cut that out so he can make safe connections.

    Then when all done with the wiring, you fasten with drywall screws a few paint stir sticks or cleats, behind the drywall to support the cutout piece, screw that in flush, mud, sand, paint.


    I have always thought there is no minimum height for breakers or panels, just a maximum height of 6' 8" to the breakers (in the U.S.). Inspected a home last year where they added a deck and the bottom of the main panel was only a few inches off the deck. I literally had to lie down on the deck to inspect the panel. The deck was permitted and approved. I commented the panel location was inconvenient and hard to access. My clients electrician (doing other work) agreed with my report- dumb but not 'illegal'.

    If there is a minimum height in a US code I would like that reference.

    Overcurrent devices shall be readily accessible and shall be installed so that the center of the grip of the operating handle of the switch or circuit breaker, when in its highest position, is not more than 2.0 m (6 ft 7 in.) above the floor or working platform...

    I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. (Thomas Edison)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
    Posts
    160

    Default Re: Question regarding new service panel off of flush mounted main panel

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy West View Post
    I have always thought there is no minimum height for breakers or panels, just a maximum height of 6' 8" to the breakers (in the U.S.). Inspected a home last year where they added a deck and the bottom of the main panel was only a few inches off the deck. I literally had to lie down on the deck to inspect the panel. The deck was permitted and approved. I commented the panel location was inconvenient and hard to access. My clients electrician (doing other work) agreed with my report- dumb but not 'illegal'.

    If there is a minimum height in a US code I would like that reference.

    Overcurrent devices shall be readily accessible and shall be installed so that the center of the grip of the operating handle of the switch or circuit breaker, when in its highest position, is not more than 2.0 m (6 ft 7 in.) above the floor or working platform...
    No minimum height for electrical equipment, unless specified by the manufacturer as part of their listing, or by adopting legislation or ADA and suchlike, except for places such as garages where you want to stay above fume level.


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