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  1. #1
    Jerome W. Young's Avatar
    Jerome W. Young Guest

    Default starter shingles

    this roof didnt appear to have a starter strip but did have the leading edge of the shingle bulled to the drip edge. is a starter required? is there a function other than holding the shingle down with the adhesive tabs?

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  2. #2
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Jerome: A starter row of shigles is required by all shingle manufacturers and therefore by the building code.

    R905.1 Roof covering application. Roof coverings shall be applied in accordance with the applicable provisions of this section and the manufacturer’s installation instructions. Unless otherwise specified in this section, roof coverings shall be installed to resist the component and cladding loads specified in Table R301.2(2), adjusted for height and exposure in accordance with Table R301.2(3).

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    Jerome: A starter row of shigles is required by all shingle manufacturers and therefore by the building code.
    And the drawing you posted shows that "starter" as a "full shingle minus 3 in. with the tabs cut off", meaning it is a standard 3-tab shingle cut down in size.

    The starter shingle or cut-down 3-tab shingle needs to be secured down to the drip edge with plastic roof cement, then nailed higher up, the sealant strip should now be in the correct location to hold the first course of shingles down, and, if not, plastic roof cement can be used for that.

    If there was no starter strip (or shingles used as a starter strip) then that is incorrect, however, your photo shows either a starter strip or cut down shingles. What is missing (at least at the location of your photo) is anything to hold the shingles down.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Frank Suchodolski's Avatar
    Frank Suchodolski Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    I also do not see any eave protection, #30 felt should extend up the slope to a minimum of 12" past the inside wall, usually first course of underlay 36" and extend past the installed drip edge, 3/4" on drip edge 1 1/2" with no drip edge.
    The worst thing I can see is the nail in the bottom left hand corner, not nice at all.

    Frank Suchodolski, High Profile Roof Care Inc

    Last edited by Frank Suchodolski; 08-25-2010 at 09:16 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Suchodolski View Post
    I also do not see any eave protection, #30 felt should extend up the slope to a minimum of 12" past the inside wall, usually first course of underlay 36" and extend past the installed drip edge, 3/4" on drip edge 1 1/2" with no drip edge.
    The worst thing I can see is the nail in the bottom left hand corner, not nice at all.

    Frank Suchodolski, ATC Consulting
    Frank,

    Not sure what you are referring to.

    There is a dry-in visible under the shingles,it extends down under the drip edge.

    In high wind areas you do not want the dry-in over the drip edge, you want the drip edge over the dry-in. Otherwise, a little bit of high wind will get under the bottom edge of the dry-in and the entire shingle roof will peel back like you are peeling a potato or orange.

    Done here in Florida, we call those high wind events "hurricanes".

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    JP:

    What is a "dry-in"?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
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    1,339

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    JP:


    What is a "dry-in"?

    The local vernacular for installed underlayment.


  8. #8
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom D'Agostino View Post
    The local vernacular for installed underlayment.
    Dom: Thanks.

    JP, for some odd reason, has become a bit lax in his usage of appropriate terminology in recent posts. Three score plus will do that to you . . .


  9. #9
    Frank Suchodolski's Avatar
    Frank Suchodolski Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Well I'm up here north of the border, Vancouver, Canada, and all of our shingle roofs have gutters installed, either built-in or hung on the fascia, the shingles should stand out and drip into the gutter. And our idea of high winds is wind in a high place.


  10. #10
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Frank,

    Not sure what you are referring to.

    There is a dry-in visible under the shingles,it extends down under the drip edge.

    In high wind areas you do not want the dry-in over the drip edge, you want the drip edge over the dry-in. Otherwise, a little bit of high wind will get under the bottom edge of the dry-in and the entire shingle roof will peel back like you are peeling a potato or orange.

    Done here in Florida, we call those high wind events "hurricanes".
    I used to get grief from many because I put the drip edge over the felt. I always tried to explain to deaf ears for years why. I always lived by the Eastern big puddle and of course always high winds. It is the only way to do it. As you say. A big wind comes along and the entire shingle and felt covering just peals off the roof.


  11. #11
    Frank Suchodolski's Avatar
    Frank Suchodolski Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Most of the manufacturer still say to put your drip edge under the the underlay at the eave and on top at the rake. Maybe they don't live in the hurricane belt. As for us, up here, wether it be #30 felt or a self adhering "Ice & Water shield" eave protection, the eave flashing goes under it. Just goes to show you, climate often dictates construction details.


  12. #12
    Frank Suchodolski's Avatar
    Frank Suchodolski Guest

    Default Re: starter shingles

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Frank,

    Not sure what you are referring to.

    There is a dry-in visible under the shingles,it extends down under the drip edge.

    In high wind areas you do not want the dry-in over the drip edge, you want the drip edge over the dry-in. Otherwise, a little bit of high wind will get under the bottom edge of the dry-in and the entire shingle roof will peel back like you are peeling a potato or orange.

    Done here in Florida, we call those high wind events "hurricanes".
    I still don't see the "dry-in" and if it is under the eave flashing it wouldn't be visible.


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