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Thread: Eave Less

  1. #1
    Ryan Busch's Avatar
    Ryan Busch Guest

    Default Eave Less

    Is there code for no eave over hang. A addition was added and the roof terminates at the exterior wall. Gutter is attached to wall and not serving any purpose due to rotted siding and roof sheating. This home is a weekend warrior mess. Inspection was supost to be yesterday but no power to home. Rescheduled for Tuesday so i am sure i will have more ?s

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Eave Less

    In Florida (which I acknowledge you are not) the code simply requires that when there is less than 6 inches overhang eave that, for termite protection, a gutter be installed and that the gutter discharge (any and all gutter discharge, which could be construed that no overflowing gutter discharge is allowed) must discharge at least 12" from the foundation, and, of course, the final grade is required to be sloped down and away from the foundation.

    That does not help your condition in which the gutter has obviously allowed water to overflow back to the siding, rotting it out.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  3. #3
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Eave Less

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Busch View Post
    Is there code for no eave over hang. A addition was added and the roof terminates at the exterior wall. Gutter is attached to wall and not serving any purpose due to rotted siding and roof sheating. This home is a weekend warrior mess. Inspection was supost to be yesterday but no power to home. Rescheduled for Tuesday so i am sure i will have more ?s
    Ryan:

    R319.1.3 Geographical areas.
    In geographical areas where
    experience has demonstrated a specific need, approved naturally
    durable or pressure-preservative-treated wood shall be used for
    those portions of wood members that form the structural supports
    of buildings, balconies, porches or similar permanent
    building appurtenances when those members are exposed to the
    weather without adequate protection from a roof, eave, overhang
    or other covering that would prevent moisture or water
    accumulation on the surface or at joints between members.
    Depending on local experience, such members may include:
    1. Horizontal members such as girders, joists and decking.
    2. Vertical members such as posts, poles and columns.
    3. Both horizontal and vertical members.




  4. #4
    Leigh Goodman's Avatar
    Leigh Goodman Guest

    Talking Re: Eave Less

    Ventilation of the attic space would be another potential problem area. Where does the air intake occur? Is it adequate?
    Water should not get behind the gutter whether there is an overhang or not.Do shingles have enough projection past the drip edge and the back of the gutter?
    Back to the original question. Besides ventilation is there another good reason for the eave overhang? It only protects the top two feet of the wall and results in uneven weathering and a two-tone house.
    I think I will cut mine off when I reroof this summer. My overhang that is. My roof overhang!!!


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    191

    Default Re: Eave Less

    Cape Cod style houses typically have no overhang at the eave. There is usually a fascia board (or molding) that is attached directly to the sheathing, and gutters (when provided) are attached to the fascia board. I live in one myself. It's 100+ years old and no problems with rot. The white cedar shingle siding is evenly weathered to the traditional Cape Cod silver-gray.

    The lack of an overhang was originally intended to better withstand high nor'easter winds on the Cape. The lack of an overhang probably reduces the likelihood of ice dams, too.

    Ventilation, when it's provided, is done with gable vents (more common on on older houses) and, on newer houses, with ridge vents and Hicks vents at the drip edge.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Eave Less

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Frederickson View Post
    Cape Cod style houses typically have no overhang at the eave. There is usually a fascia board (or molding) that is attached directly to the sheathing, and gutters (when provided) are attached to the fascia board..
    This was not a Cape Cod design, more like Cape Fear, but standing up well after 80 or 90 years. The other side of the gable roof has a healthy 2 foot overhang. Maintain the gutter.

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  7. #7
    Ryan Busch's Avatar
    Ryan Busch Guest

    Default Re: Eave Less

    Pics of eave less. Competly rotted out walls.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Eave Less

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Busch View Post
    Pics of eave less. Competly rotted out walls.
    That is not because there is no overhang, that is because people do not understand how water flows and they do not use flashings, not not ship lap/shingle lap the material to shed water.

    Stupid people do stupid things and, over time, those stupid things show the stupidity which was used.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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