Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    No, I didn't inspect this one... I don't have a picture from the inspection, and this is the first depiction of this type of "roof access enclosure" GOOGLE turned up...

    Anyway, what is the correct term for this structure?

    - Thanks

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Member Benefits1
    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  2. #2
    Mark Aakjar's Avatar
    Mark Aakjar Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Crap is what it looks like Not to be on the to technical side but I always referred to them as roof accesses, and when stairs where involved stair roof access and I have said it to and heard it from architects and engineers alike. some may refer to the roof as a W/X pronounced wixs.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    WESTMINSTER CO
    Posts
    1,090

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    mike

    looks like a BIG shed style roof

    charlie


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    bulkhead


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    WESTMINSTER CO
    Posts
    1,090

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    h.g

    isn't a bulkhead a struture that protrudes up from another roof or ship, go navy--this looks like a ground struture with a shed sloped roof???

    charlie


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    WESTMINSTER CO
    Posts
    1,090

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    hg
    looking at the picture again--it is on a roof, oh well ,go navy

    charlie


  7. #7
    Michael Garrity's Avatar
    Michael Garrity Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    It is a mono pitched roof


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,549

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    It's where the good guys go when the bad guys are chasing them, and the doors are never locked.

    "Roof access enclosure" is good enough for Google.


  9. #9
    Frank Suchodolski's Avatar
    Frank Suchodolski Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Most structures built on roofs would be termed "Penthouse" (no, not the magazine) or as i like to call them URA "Upright Roof Access", gotta hate those roof hatches, especially when the hatch opens the wrong way.

    Frank Suchodolski, RRO


  10. #10
    Mark Aakjar's Avatar
    Mark Aakjar Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Suchodolski View Post
    Most structures built on roofs would be termed "Penthouse" (no, not the magazine) or as i like to call them URA "Upright Roof Access", gotta hate those roof hatches, especially when the hatch opens the wrong way.

    Frank Suchodolski, RRO
    The roof access is a catch 22 egress reasons want the door to swing out but if you live where there is snow anytime after large a storm your not getting up there.


  11. #11
    Shawn Best's Avatar
    Shawn Best Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Idustrial Art...?


  12. #12
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    If it were in a pitched roof it would be a shed dormer, but it's not.

    If it had a glass roof along with those glass windows it might be a skylight, or even a greenhouse, but it's not.

    If it were in a ship or on the front of a shop building it would be a bulkhead, but it's not.

    I would call it the roof access door enframement or structure.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    AD,

    that may be, but the Chicago ordinances (building codes) refer to it as a bulkhead (reached by stairs, as opposed to the smaller via ladder scuttle), and have since at least 1905.

    Ex.

    Passed March 13, 1905 Chicago Building Code, Sect. 617: "Every tenement house shall have in the roof a bulkhead or scuttle, fireproof or covered with fireproof materials, with stairs or ladder leading thereto; no such roof opening shall be less than two feet by three feet. No scuttle or bulkhead door shall have upon it any lock, but may be fastened on the inside by movable bolts or hooks."

    Current ex.: Present day Chicago Building Code, 15-8-560 Miscellaneous roof structures. "Miscellaneous roof structures, including dormers, bulkheads, scuttles and similar structures shall be consturcted of material not less fire-resistant than required for the roof construction on which they are erected."

    NYC & NYS still call them bulkheads too (as do most firefighters).

    If the enclosure over stairs which provide roof deck access - bulkhead.




    NY: "A: Interior Stairs shall provide Roof Access as follows:

    -At least one Interior Stair shall provide Roof Access in buildings or building sections greater than 3 stories or 40' high, when the roof has a slope of less than twenty degrees. Access to setback roof areas may be through a door or window opening to the roof. Interior stairs extending to roofs shall be enclosed in bulkheads of fire-resistant construction."



    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 12-13-2009 at 11:02 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    If it were in a pitched roof it would be a shed dormer, but it's not.

    If it had a glass roof along with those glass windows it might be a skylight, or even a greenhouse, but it's not.

    If it were in a ship or on the front of a shop building it would be a bulkhead, but it's not.

    I would call it the roof access door enframement or structure.
    I think from the picture and description MT provided, and the ensuing discussion, it was clear the term was not pertaining to a Naval, Aeronautics or Civil Engineering context.

    Bulkhead is correct, used in the Chicago Codes, Firefighters frequently apply the term as well.

    According to Merriam-webster.com its history dates back to at least 15th century relating to structural/building term usage.

    bulkhead - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

    and from: Bulkhead Definition | Definition of Bulkhead at Dictionary.com

    bulkhead
    -noun
    1. Nautical. any of various wall-like constructions inside a vessel, as for forming watertight compartments, subdividing space, or strengthening the structure.
    2. Aeronautics. a transverse partition or reinforcing frame in the body of an airplane.
    3. Civil Engineering.
      1. a partition built in a subterranean passage to prevent the passage of air, water, or mud.
      2. a retaining structure of timber, steel, or reinforced concrete, used for shore protection and in harbor works.
    4. Building Trades.
      1. a horizontal or inclined outside door over a stairway leading to a cellar.
      2. a boxlike structure, as on a roof, covering a stairwell or other opening



    Chicago ordinances & Illinois Fire Marshal would more accurately call the pictured a "roof bulkhead".


  15. #15
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    HG: I spoke too soon, having only glanced at the OED, which does not support the definition. The unabridged versions of Webster's (not yours quoted) and American Heritage do support it. That's a new usage of the term for me.

    Live and learn.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: Correct term for "roof access enclosure"

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    HG: I spoke too soon, having only glanced at the OED, which does not support the definition. The unabridged versions of Webster's (not yours quoted) and American Heritage do support it. That's a new usage of the term for me.

    Live and learn.
    Seems to be going out of fashion, as my generation and the next die off will likely become obsolete after four centuries and over two decades of internet.

    I'm still struggling with gia-normous and some of the other recently fashioned words.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •