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  1. #1
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    Default What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    The first two pics are fiberglass impregnated shingles on shiplap. The third is similar faults on a different roof, OSB sheathing. The third pic shows damage as well, probably, I'm guessing, from scraping with a snow shovel. Anyway, that was my explanation for the damage there.

    Can anyone give a reason for the ridges forming like that? The shingles on the other sides of both these roofs were laid relatively flat. If it was cold when these were laid and the tar strips became stuck, OK, this could cause them to hump up on a hot day. But ........ the pics were taken in cold weather. In hot weather, would the tar strips not let go and allow the shingles to spread?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    "Can anyone give a reason for the ridges forming like that?"

    Yes.
    The same crew that installed the siding, also installed the roof.

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Just looking at that siding long enough and I'd probably slid off the roof.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Would call that: "Shingle buckling over the deck joints."

    Movement in the decking - not installed properly (shiplap used, board or skip deck no more than 6" and lapped without spacing for expansion warping, or an initial conditioning issue/MC of the milled lumber, i.e. failure to pre-condition and sticker in advance and going ahead and shingling too soon after installation not allowing for intial conditioning and then re-smoothing felt - OSB or PLY not spaced & clips, moisture content/exposure, direction and span support can also, etc. are some examples) and/or less than flat smooth taught install of felt/tar paper or other (wrinkled underlayment, etc.).

    Contraction/expansion movement - moisture & temperature environment in the under deck space (attic, etc.) a leak, etc.

    Whatever changes/imperfections under the composition shingles will "broadcast" through them.

    Keep in mind that even if everything was done as correctly as possible, Regions with high humidity fluctuation = vulnerability to seasonal buckling events: it is a direct consequence of climate and the nature of the sheathing materials and the nature of compo asphalt shingles. Some visable buckling or picture framing with seasonal shifts with the OSB or PLY of the compo shingles won't be completely able to be avoided (without risking wind-blown lifting/tear off) when there is high humidity fluctuation at the location.

    Is why most mfgs recommend against installing asphalt shingles over dimmensional or milled lumber deck and use Plywood with proper spacing and clips as the basis standard and spec proper conditioning of the deck material and stretched smooth felt or wrinkle free underlayment and go on and on about proper conditioning/ventillaton minimizing moisture of the underdeck zone.

    Buckles or buckling. You can word search the manufacturer literature or use the term on a search engine (such as: buckling shingles) you'll find the info you need (rather than "ridge" or "ridges").

    Here is a link to CASMA Tech Bulletin 9: http://www.iko.com/misc/CasmaPdf/09-Buckling.PDF

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 12-31-2009 at 09:41 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    To me it looks like the shingles were probably installed over another layers of badly cupped and curled shingles. That or wet tar paper.

    MinnesotaHomeInspectors.com
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Rowe View Post
    To me it looks like the shingles were probably installed over another layers of badly cupped and curled shingles.

    That's what it looks like to me, the spacing of the ridges are the same as the spacing of the shingles.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7

    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    I have seen some folks partially remove the original layer of shingles up to a certain point then install the new over the remaining old. From the ridge it would look like one layer but in reality it was 2. Don't know why folks do that.

    Michael Carson
    Inspect It Right Home Inspections L.L.C.
    www.inspectitrighthomeinspection.com

  8. #8
    James Kiser's Avatar
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Can you tell if it's 2 or more layers of shingles. could also be a attic ventilation problem.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Ok, best answers to date, Pics 1 and 2, Curled shiplap planks, possibly, or 2 layers.
    Pic 3, probably 2 layers of shingles on OSB.

    Rick, the siding is Rustic bevel cedar, very popular in 1975.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Ok, best answers to date, Pics 1 and 2, Curled shiplap planks, possibly, or 2 layers.
    Pic 3, probably 2 layers of shingles on OSB.

    Rick, the siding is Rustic bevel cedar, very popular in 1975.
    If the house was built in 1975 it's probably 2 layers on plywood. Original layer of shingles was probably about 20 years old when they put the second layer on it. That layer is now 15 years old.

    MinnesotaHomeInspectors.com
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  11. #11
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    Nail/staple pops/lifts can also cause that effect (tabs to buck).

    Again whatever movement/changes/imperfections under the composition shingles can/will broadcast through them.


  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    My guess is a two layer roof that should have had the first layer removed.

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What causes these ridges in shingle courses?

    In the instances where I have come across this condition, it was caused by overlaying cupped/curled shingles with another course of new roofing.


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