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  1. #1
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
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    Default Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    A house inspector said to leave these shingles alone. He said they are well secured to the roof and to replace them would involve disrupting the surrounding shingles and, therefore, do more harm than benefit to the roof.

    A roofer who came to assess the roof said to replace the damaged shingles because they would wear out prematurely (He also attributed the raised shingle to a nail pop; however, there actually is no high nail under there--itís just air).

    I would think that both raised shingles and damaged shingles would make the shingles/roof more vulnerable to fire.

    What do you recommend and why?

    Thanks.

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  2. #2
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    To have an opinion I would need to know how old the roof is and would need to know how visible they are from the ground.


  3. #3
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    The roof is eleven months old; the shingles are quite visible from the ground. Of course, the roof would look better if they were replaced. What do you think about the functional questions? Thanks for taking the time to consider this matter.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Your best bet is to follow the advice of local roofers who can see, inspect, and touch the roof.

    If they say to replace "damaged" shingles, and the roof is only 11 months old, then go ahead and get it done.


  5. #5
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Since the roof is less than a year old it is probably still in warranty. I would get the same roofer who installed the roof to repair. The roof has a long time left on it so I would get it repaired by the same guy that installed it.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Get the architectural shingle Manufacturer's Regional Rep out there PDQ (Pretty Darn QUICK) to assess the workmanship and warranty status of the shingles (i.e. installation).


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Katherine Abernathy View Post
    A house inspector said to leave these shingles alone. He said they are well secured to the roof and to replace them would involve disrupting the surrounding shingles and, therefore, do more harm than benefit to the roof.

    A roofer who came to assess the roof said to replace the damaged shingles because they would wear out prematurely (He also attributed the raised shingle to a nail pop; however, there actually is no high nail under there--it’s just air).

    I would think that both raised shingles and damaged shingles would make the shingles/roof more vulnerable to fire.

    What do you recommend and why?

    Thanks.
    Katherine,
    I am the Director of Education of a large property inspector association. The photo does not help very much in providing advice. However, there's one thing that I believe. Home inspectors typically have more knowledge and real experience in evaluating the condition of existing roof covering than do most "roofers." An experienced inspector may have hundreds (or even thousands) of roof covering evaluations upon which they base their unbiased opinion. Installers know how to install a roof properly. But inspectors make their living providing written reports of the condition of systems and components, particularly roof coverings.

    Before spending money, there are a few things to consider, including the cause and type of the damage. Consider asking your inspector to comment upon the cause of the damage. Was it a manufacturer's defect, damage from environmental factors, installation or post-installation damage? The type of damage: Is the damage cosmetic or functional? Etc. With addressing all of these things, your inspector can help you.

    With all things being equal, trust your home inspector.

    Also, I recommend hiring your inspector as part of a homeowner's regular maintenance plan.

    Last edited by Benjamin Gromicko; 11-21-2010 at 07:27 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Gromicko View Post
    Katherine,

    With all things being equal, trust your inspector.
    Hmmm, I'll be darned. Just another day you were attempting to bash another HI org about an ad they had, that was never used, stating the house doesn't need another electrical system. Now your stating, with out seeing Kathernines roof, if the Home Inspector said everything is fine, you don't need a new roof.

    This roof had a full summer to lay flat and seal. With the information provided it sure looks like there is an installation problem or a mfg defect.

    I'm with HG, if the roof is less than 1 yr old the shingle rep should be contacted to inspect the roof and determine what the problem is.

    Last edited by Dan Harris; 11-21-2010 at 08:27 PM.
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  9. #9
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    I believe she has already said the inspector said to leave them alone and the roofer said to fix them. I agree with the roofer. A 11 month old roof should not show damage....IMO.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by James Duffin View Post
    Since the roof is less than a year old it is probably still in warranty. I would get the same roofer who installed the roof to repair. The roof has a long time left on it so I would get it repaired by the same guy that installed it.
    Yep, that should be covered by his warranty, let the original roofer correct it.

    If the original roofer refuses, well ... you will have (hopefully) already followed H. G.'s advice and ...
    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr.
    Get the architectural shingle Manufacturer's Regional Rep out there PDQ (Pretty Darn QUICK) to assess the workmanship and warranty status of the shingles (i.e. installation).
    ... meaning that the manufacturer's representative is already on the way.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  11. #11
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    I had my 26 year old shingles replaced on my house three weeks ago....twice. The first roofer used a nail gun and made a mess so it had to be torn off and replaced by a second roofer. The first roofer got the manufactures rep to come by and all the rep would commit to was that the shingles were OK. He would not commit to a bad installation. He suggested that the first roofer hire a roof inspector for another opinion besides mine. He did that and the roof inspector said it was the biggest mess he had ever seen. My point is that the manufactures rep will not be much help unless you have faulty shingles.

    Last edited by James Duffin; 11-22-2010 at 05:14 AM. Reason: Spelling

  12. #12
    Phil Brody's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    If that's the only place the roof shows evidence of an issue, have the original installer come by to replace the affected shingles, since it is a minuet job. If the are other areas for concern definitely the manufactures rep should be contacted.


  13. #13
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Katherine
    I would recommend you contacting HAAG Engineering to see if there is a qualified roof inspector in your area. The closest office to you would be out of Tampa FL. Phone # 1-800-218-8886. Or go to there Web site at Haag Engineering - Leaders in Forensic Engineering I would trust them over the Home Inspector or the roofer.
    It is the Home Inspectors job to visually look over the roof and give his opinion on whether at the time he is viewing that roof it will shed water and if it is leaking at that time. Scuffed shingles may not be of an issue to him. He does not do an invasive inspection.
    The roofer sees it as a way to get more money and to often has less qualifications then the HI. The original roofer may see it as everything is find and don't worry about it It's going to cost him money to fix your concerns And remember that when the home was built the builder probably used the cheapest roofer he could find.
    It is the job of that roof inspector associated with and has gone through the HAAG training to inspect your roof and tell you everything about it. After he gets done then you will have what you need to go back to the roofer that installed your roof and hopefully get any repairs done that is needed.
    Bruce


  14. #14
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
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    Wink Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    more vulnerable to fire.

    That is a good one, If you can say that with a straight face add the emotional component how a shingle that's not laying flat upsets you . Sleeplessness, loss of appetite for food and conjugal , if you came up with vulnerable to fire you are in a league of your own.

    Naturally a replacement of a shingle from a different dye lot would exacerbate the issue and a total replacement is the only acceptable solution that you would allow.

    Don't settle for work from the same contractor because if they did work like that the hubris that they used a bent and chipped shingle is unacceptable.

    Get a big check and forget about the roof. On a hot day step on the bump. And look at the chips and fondly remember what fools everybody were that paid to not have to deal with you anymore. You showed em.


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Katherine,
    You say : " I would think that both raised shingles and damaged shingles would make the shingles/roof more vulnerable to fire. "

    Explain your understanding for fire as it is related to you shingles.

    If the shingles were laid in Jan 2010, what was the temp at installation.


  16. #16

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Gromicko View Post
    Katherine,
    I am the Director of Education of a large property inspector association. The photo does not help very much in providing advice. However, there's one thing that I believe. Home inspectors typically have more knowledge and real experience in evaluating the condition of existing roof covering than do most "roofers." An experienced inspector may have hundreds (or even thousands) of roof covering evaluations upon which they base their unbiased opinion. Installers know how to install a roof properly. But inspectors make their living providing written reports of the condition of systems and components, particularly roof coverings.

    Before spending money, there are a few things to consider, including the cause and type of the damage. Consider asking your inspector to comment upon the cause of the damage. Was it a manufacturer's defect, damage from environmental factors, installation or post-installation damage? The type of damage: Is the damage cosmetic or functional? Etc. With addressing all of these things, your inspector can help you.

    With all things being equal, trust your home inspector.

    Also, I recommend hiring your inspector as part of a homeowner's regular maintenance plan.
    This goes in line with a "beef" I have with most HI's around and let me pose this question here since we are on the topic. How do you estimate the remaining life of a roof?
    I hear it all the time from HI's, this roof has X years of life. Just last week I saw one report from a HI saying a brand new roof had 5 yrs left of life. The reason I have an issue with it is that the assessments I've seen are completely subjective and with no grounding objective criteria (for instance I like the insurance's approach of X number of hits per square to judget a roof for hail damage).
    I also hear the typical HI answer "I have X yrs doing home inspections and have seen hundreds of roofs, etc., etc." but that only tells me that you've seen a roof for "ONE DAY" and the condition it was in that day (with perhaps some idea of how old it was on that day). How does that make you an expert in estimateing the remaining life of the roof? I have yet to hear anyone testify to a logitudinal study of roof life in their experience.
    Now I do understand there are those few examples where it is obvious that a roof will barely make it through the next season or two, or where the roof has obvious physical damage (e.g., blown shingles, etc.) but other than that; estimating that a roof has 5, 8, 10, 15 years left is pure BS in IMHO.


  17. #17
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by champainspectionnews View Post
    This goes in line with a "beef" I have with most HI's around and let me pose this question here since we are on the topic. How do you estimate the remaining life of a roof?
    I hear it all the time from HI's, this roof has X years of life. Just last week I saw one report from a HI saying a brand new roof had 5 yrs left of life. The reason I have an issue with it is that the assessments I've seen are completely subjective and with no grounding objective criteria (for instance I like the insurance's approach of X number of hits per square to judget a roof for hail damage).
    I also hear the typical HI answer "I have X yrs doing home inspections and have seen hundreds of roofs, etc., etc." but that only tells me that you've seen a roof for "ONE DAY" and the condition it was in that day (with perhaps some idea of how old it was on that day). How does that make you an expert in estimateing the remaining life of the roof? I have yet to hear anyone testify to a logitudinal study of roof life in their experience.
    Now I do understand there are those few examples where it is obvious that a roof will barely make it through the next season or two, or where the roof has obvious physical damage (e.g., blown shingles, etc.) but other than that; estimating that a roof has 5, 8, 10, 15 years left is pure BS in IMHO.
    I agree...unless you have a crystal ball there is no way to tell how long a roof will last before it starts leaking. I try to determine the age of a roof with information available but that is not always possible. If the age can not be determined I then go with more or less than 10 years old and state that the typical life expectancy based on the manufactures warranty is 20 years. There is really no way to "guess" the age of a roof.


  18. #18
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    From all the evidence I have been given...One Photo. Here is my opinion. It looks like mechanical damage either from a tree branch or it could even be from the original roofer dragging an air hose over that portion of the roof during installation.
    Could even be from a satellite dish installer or Chimney Sweep sitting down for lunch and the tools in his belt damaged those shingles.

    I would think you are going to have a hard time getting the original roofer to cover this. The roofer you had evaluate the problem probably could need some work at this time and would be "perfectly" (oops) willing to charge you for re-installation. How much time did he give you to evaluate your roof problems(?) Did he evaluate it for free? (probably) Did you offer to compensate him for his time and expertise?...
    As far as this condition "make(ing) the shingles/roof more vulnerable to fire."...I just don't see it. Same with the "Woven Valley (problem?)

    Is there a reason you do not trust the advise and or report given by your HI?


  19. #19
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    More vulnerable to blow off (you are in hurricane zone, yes? wind resistance and your home insurer might be additionally concerned regarding liability for all that other pictured in your other posts peeling off and hitting someone] and shingle damage, as well as lift off from ice/snow/dam backups, not so much fire with composite shingles; and collections of debris, and harboring insect colonization.


  20. #20
    Daniel Mummey's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Katherine, Katherine,
    Calm down. Everything's going to be alright. "Damage" looks slight and end of tab looks mechanically caused (i.e. shoe/boot heel, flying debris, hammer...etc.).
    Don't replace unless your all about appearances. Do you have leaks? I don't know about the slight air gap under shingle tab being an increased fire risk? If there's a portion of the roofing course that roofers crowded and is binding, not laying flat, they should redo. It happen on my roof and the only part that puzzled me was, didn't they even look at their finished work! It was so obvious. Yeh, they had to redo a small portion.


  21. #21
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.


    Thank you, all of you, for taking the time to consider my question and offer advice. Sorry to have been away from the threads for so long.

    I gather that nobody seems to share the inspectorís concern that fixing that area would weaken the surrounding area.

    And nobody seems to be worried about fire. I read somewhere that a shingle is vulnerable to fire when the asphalt is exposed. I was thinking that if the house next door, which is only about 15 feet away, caught fire, the pine trees and pine straw between our houses could also ignite, and sparks could ignite exposed asphalt and go into gaps. But that wonít matter with regard to these shingles, because, after reading your replies, Iíve decided to ask for replacement.

    Iím sure the contractor who sent out the roofer will replace them. I donít know how I would go about finding anyone better. Both the remodeling company (the contractor) and the roofing company that sent out the roofer who did the assessment have top reputations around here.

    Dom, the roofer did not touch the roof. He did not even bring a ladder.

    Larry, yes, I paid the roofer for his assessment. I also paid the home inspector. A number of people have advised me to get a mfrís rep to come evaluate our roof, but Certainteed reps whom Iíve talked with on the phone tell me thatís not possible, itís not an available option. They recommend calling a home inspector or a building inspector. A state building inspector (NC has a state-wide building code) told me they are only interested in new construction, and ours was a tear off reshingle of a 1989 roof.

    I think Iíll write a general introduction thread that addresses such questions & others that keep coming up.

    Iím not looking to nit pick, and I certainly would rather not redo the entire roof. What I donít want is to have an avoidable roof problem some years from now. In many cases I do not know whether some imperfection is important or unimportant, what poses a functional problem, what is reasonable to ask for, what should be done.

    Bruce, thank you very much for the information about Haag.
    Phil, I think thatís the only shingle that is raised that way. There are a few other places where shingles have granules scraped off or notches at the edge. One shingle has a bigger piece torn out of it and clearly needs to be replaced. Neither the roofer nor the inspector noticed those other damaged shingles. For that matter, they only noticed the shingles under discussion because I pointed them out to them and asked what they thought.

    Garry, I donít know the temp at installation. Winter temperatures vary quite a bit here. It was colder than it is now, and this week the high is expected to be 63, the low 28.

    HG, debris and insect colonization--yes! Pine needles, spiders, wasps, bees, and an unbelievable amount of pollen, especially in the spring when you can see yellow curtains of pollen blow by but also now, in November, of all times, if you leave your car out overnight it will get dusted with pollen. Also, yes, we do get hurricanes, though not often. Fran was the most recent hurricane, in 1996. Usually they donít come quite this far inland; but every year we do get torrential rain storms that are on the outskirts of hurricanes. We get freezing rain every year and snow, usually only a few inches per snowfall, but occasionally much more--over 20 inches in a storm about ten years ago.

    Daniel, thanks for your calming words. No leaks. You mentioned shingles that are not lying flat; here are some other pics. Also, here are pics of a 35 ft. gap along an eave, covered only by drooping shingles, that both the inspector and the roofer assessor missed. I didnít know about this gap when they were here.


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  22. #22
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    More pics. I'm guessing that the very slight shingle elevations beside walls are to be expcted, but not the bigger ones, is that right? Or are all of these okay and not worth bothering with? Thanks. K.










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  23. #23
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    I must admit that I see very little wrong in all of the pictures.

    Many of the issues that you are seeing with the shingles will go away when it heats back up in the spring or summer months. When it is cold they are not very flexible.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
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  24. #24
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Katherine
    I do not see many concerns with your pictures. The flashing at the side wall by your pictures appears good. The lifted shingles after 11 months should have laid down. Not going to make much difference on fire. Keep the pine needles off the roof will make the most difference as for fire.
    If you have the roof repaired or replaced get a third party, that is qualified, to certify the roof to inspect the work. That may not be a roofer or Home inspector.
    I do see some problems with your roof. The picture that shows the opening above the drip edge. Decking should extend all the way to the end of the roof rafter. And drip edge nailed to the decking. The underlayment should be on top of the drip edge at the eaves. And under the drip edge at the rake of the roof. And you should not see daylight in these areas in the attic. The starter shingle is not properly nailed. See CertainTeeds installation instructions. I have Certified several roofs over the years. Failed more than I have certified. I would have to fail yours.
    Bruce


  25. #25
    Phil Brody's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    I would far from fail that roof ! A couple sloppy points and relatively easy repairs, but based on the pictures I don't see a leak prone area for 25 years.


  26. #26
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Katherine Abernathy View Post

    Thank you, all of you, for taking the time to consider my question and offer advice. Sorry to have been away from the threads for so long.

    I gather that nobody seems to share the inspectorís concern that fixing that area would weaken the surrounding area.

    And nobody seems to be worried about fire. I read somewhere that a shingle is vulnerable to fire when the asphalt is exposed. I was thinking that if the house next door, which is only about 15 feet away, caught fire, the pine trees and pine straw between our houses could also ignite, and sparks could ignite exposed asphalt and go into gaps. But that wonít matter with regard to these shingles, because, after reading your replies, Iíve decided to ask for replacement.

    Iím sure the contractor who sent out the roofer will replace them. I donít know how I would go about finding anyone better. Both the remodeling company (the contractor) and the roofing company that sent out the roofer who did the assessment have top reputations around here.

    Dom, the roofer did not touch the roof. He did not even bring a ladder.

    Larry, yes, I paid the roofer for his assessment. I also paid the home inspector. A number of people have advised me to get a mfrís rep to come evaluate our roof, but Certainteed reps whom Iíve talked with on the phone tell me thatís not possible, itís not an available option. They recommend calling a home inspector or a building inspector. A state building inspector (NC has a state-wide building code) told me they are only interested in new construction, and ours was a tear off reshingle of a 1989 roof.

    I think Iíll write a general introduction thread that addresses such questions & others that keep coming up.

    Iím not looking to nit pick, and I certainly would rather not redo the entire roof. What I donít want is to have an avoidable roof problem some years from now. In many cases I do not know whether some imperfection is important or unimportant, what poses a functional problem, what is reasonable to ask for, what should be done.

    Bruce, thank you very much for the information about Haag.
    Phil, I think thatís the only shingle that is raised that way. There are a few other places where shingles have granules scraped off or notches at the edge. One shingle has a bigger piece torn out of it and clearly needs to be replaced. Neither the roofer nor the inspector noticed those other damaged shingles. For that matter, they only noticed the shingles under discussion because I pointed them out to them and asked what they thought.

    Garry, I donít know the temp at installation. Winter temperatures vary quite a bit here. It was colder than it is now, and this week the high is expected to be 63, the low 28.

    HG, debris and insect colonization--yes! Pine needles, spiders, wasps, bees, and an unbelievable amount of pollen, especially in the spring when you can see yellow curtains of pollen blow by but also now, in November, of all times, if you leave your car out overnight it will get dusted with pollen. Also, yes, we do get hurricanes, though not often. Fran was the most recent hurricane, in 1996. Usually they donít come quite this far inland; but every year we do get torrential rain storms that are on the outskirts of hurricanes. We get freezing rain every year and snow, usually only a few inches per snowfall, but occasionally much more--over 20 inches in a storm about ten years ago.

    Daniel, thanks for your calming words. No leaks. You mentioned shingles that are not lying flat; here are some other pics. Also, here are pics of a 35 ft. gap along an eave, covered only by drooping shingles, that both the inspector and the roofer assessor missed. I didnít know about this gap when they were here.
    The first pic in this section where you are holding the shingles up? Is that the sheathing not coming down all the way. Is that the attic I see through that hole. Is it this way all along the edge of the roof.

    If all I stated is factual I see a very big concern with the roof. The bottom shingles will be the first to lift and the wind is already in your attic trying to rip the entire roof off.

    Now, if the questions are all no then I am sorry for alarming you.

    By the way. There is nothing wrong with replacing the ripped shingles. I could almost guarantee that you have a handful or bundle of shingles left over that will match just fine. If not the run may not be the same but it will be extremely close to the proper color that the untrained eye will not pick it up. An experienced man can and does all the time replace shingles and then put some roofing cement under the shingles disturbed and everything comes out just fine.


  27. #27
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
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    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Brody View Post
    I would far from fail that roof ! A couple sloppy points and relatively easy repairs, but based on the pictures I don't see a leak prone area for 25 years.
    Phil
    First off there differences between Certifying a roof and just Inspecting a roof. And under both I would report of the findings that send up the red flags.
    I lift starter shingle when I inspect a roof and if I were to find 35 ft along the eave that was missing the decking, and the underlayment was not properly installed I would report it as an issue with this roof. As the shingles settle into this area it is going to allow water to accumulate and migrate under the shingle in an area that the home owner would not notice until it is to late. There is a reason the decking needs to extend all the way to the eaves. Also this would allow this area to easy blow off.
    To certify a roof it has to be installed according to the Manufacture. If it does not meet or exceed the Manufactures installation, I will not sign off on it. And I will report all that I find incorrect with the installation.
    Bruce


  28. #28
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
    Katherine Abernathy Guest

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Yes, Ted, that is the sheathing not coming down all the way, and yes you are looking at the attic through that hole. I found out about this gap when I hired someone to get up on a ladder and measure how far out the shingles extend, all around the house. The place where you see the sun shining through the shingles is the attic side of where the shingling was lifted up.

    And yes, it turns out that all around the house the sheathing, in varying amounts, stops short of the rafter ends.

    Also, there are places where the fascia are attached to the rafters at a point lower than the top edge of the rafters, which contributes to a vertical gap between fascia and sheathing.

    This 35 ft. eave is the only eave with no drip edge. I've been told that the roofers put in drip edge, and the carpenters who did the fascia subsequently removed it. The remodeling company wants their gutter men, not their roofers (all subcontractors, but essentially theirs) to reinstall drip edge. Meanwhile, I've found, of course, that the drip edge that they use--regular D style--does not extend far enough to reach the top of the sheathing. So there are also gaps other places where, if you're outdoors looking up, it seems as though there is no space uncovered by drip edge.

    Should the roofers who tore off the old and put on this new roof have put more wood on the deck so that it went to the end of the rafters? Or just used gutter apron instead of d.e. since d.e. doesn't make it? Is it okay to just use gutter apron in such situations, to bridge gaps? If they should have amended the sheathing, I don't know why they didn't--it was agreed we would pay unexpected repairs.

    Bruce, when you talk about certifying a roof, are you talking about the HAAG people you mentioned or are there others who certify roofs?

    Thank you for your time and advice.


  29. #29
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Katherine Abernathy View Post
    Yes, Ted, that is the sheathing not coming down all the way, and yes you are looking at the attic through that hole. I found out about this gap when I hired someone to get up on a ladder and measure how far out the shingles extend, all around the house. The place where you see the sun shining through the shingles is the attic side of where the shingling was lifted up.

    And yes, it turns out that all around the house the sheathing, in varying amounts, stops short of the rafter ends.

    Also, there are places where the fascia are attached to the rafters at a point lower than the top edge of the rafters, which contributes to a vertical gap between fascia and sheathing.

    This 35 ft. eave is the only eave with no drip edge. I've been told that the roofers put in drip edge, and the carpenters who did the fascia subsequently removed it. The remodeling company wants their gutter men, not their roofers (all subcontractors, but essentially theirs) to reinstall drip edge. Meanwhile, I've found, of course, that the drip edge that they use--regular D style--does not extend far enough to reach the top of the sheathing. So there are also gaps other places where, if you're outdoors looking up, it seems as though there is no space uncovered by drip edge.

    Should the roofers who tore off the old and put on this new roof have put more wood on the deck so that it went to the end of the rafters? Or just used gutter apron instead of d.e. since d.e. doesn't make it? Is it okay to just use gutter apron in such situations, to bridge gaps? If they should have amended the sheathing, I don't know why they didn't--it was agreed we would pay unexpected repairs.

    Bruce, when you talk about certifying a roof, are you talking about the HAAG people you mentioned or are there others who certify roofs?

    Any roofer worth his salt (isn't that from a movie) should have repaired any faults they found in the sheathing. Of course this is after they showed it to you and gave you the price to do so. Some roofers use to throw in a piece of sheathing here and there but that does not happen much today.

    Katherine, this needs to be addressed. I am not sure in the Carolina's you are but all of both of them are prone to high winds. Like I said earlier. The wind has an open hole already to get in to rip your roof off. It does not have to blow on your roof for a long tame and eventually create a hole to get in to rip your roof off. That in itself is the most serious defect but would have been an easy fix when the roof was done over. The sheathing has to come all the way down and then the drip edge sits on top of it.
    Thank you for your time and advice.


  30. #30
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
    Bruce Adams Guest

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Bruce, when you talk about certifying a roof, are you talking about the HAAG people you mentioned or are there others who certify roofs?

    Thank you for your time and advice.[/quote]

    Katherine
    Yes there are others out there. I belong to the National Roofing Association, Carry a Masters Roofers Certificate through CertainTeed. And have been through the HAAG training. I do not install roofs. I do work with roofing Companies here that I got in good with because I failed there roofs.
    I am a Home Inspector and a Independent Insurance Adjuster.
    The people that I have met with HAAG I have learned to trust. If there is not someone from HAAG in your area. Good sources to find someone is through your insurance agent, Call CertainTeed to see if there is someone in your area that is certified through them. Call around to the to see if there is a Home Inspector that is Qualified to Certify your roof.
    I do not recommend you get another roofer to inspect it. You need to get someone that has no interest in your roof. That is going to give an honest opinion of the condition of the roof. And that it is properly installed.
    Let your roofer know that the roof will be inspected after installation by a third party. So he knows up front that he better do a good job. Ask for the installation instructions from the manufacture. He is more apt to read them. If he complains tell him it is your home and you want it right.
    Bruce


  31. #31
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
    Katherine Abernathy Guest

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Ted and Bruce, thank you very much for your additional thoughts and advice. I've arranged for someone from the HAAG list to come out and evaluate my roof; I believe he will be good.


  32. #32
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
    Bruce Adams Guest

    Default Re: Damaged shingles: leave as is or replace? Photo.

    Katherine
    Good luck. Hope all works out. It is always good to have someone working for your benefit.
    Let me know how you do with HAAG. Good or bad. Hopefully it will be good.
    Bruce


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