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  1. #1
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
    Katherine Abernathy Guest

    Default Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    People at Certainteed told me that it would not be possible to get a Certainteed rep to come check our roof--thatís not an option, they donít do that. Several people have made that suggestion, so perhaps other companies do send out reps, and maybe Certainteed used to.

    The Certainteed people suggested I get a building inspector or a home inspector to come out. The building inspector told me theyíre only interested in new construction.

    Iím not trying to yank anyoneís chain, HG. And I do not want to and will not need to sue the contractor. He will comply with any reasonable request. That is the way he is; you can bank on that.

    What Iíve been trying to do is figure out what I should request. Just telling him that I have general concerns and relying on him to find any problems wonít fly. It would waste his time and most likely result in problems not being identified and therefore not addressed. Thatís how this happened in the first place. Yes, we were supposed to be able to just leave it in his hands, and thatís what we did originally.

    Here is what happened. The roof went up. The new shingles are much prettier than what was there before (original 1989 shingles), and we were very pleased. We did not scrutinize the details because (1) Weíre busy with other things; (2) Knowing nothing about roofing, we werenít equipped to assess the quality; (3) The same company, in the same renovation project, was doing other things well; (4) We werenít supposed to have to learn about roofing, thatís their job; (5) The junky drip edge is in less apparent locations, generally higher up; and (5) I did ask about the two things that were/are very noticeably different from our old roof--the big distance the shingles extend beyond the deck and the woven valleys--and was told in each case that those were ideal.

    Came time to put up gutters. Question arose: where do you want downspouts? I started paying closer attention to that area. Whereas the drip edge in areas close to the ground and near entrances is nice, I noticed the other areas that are junky. Also noticed damaged shingles. Also noticed that shingles along some rakes are not in a straight line, and, on three rakes, they are in a straight line but not the same distance from the drip edge at the top as at the bottom.

    That lack of carefulness, lack of caring, made me wonder anew about the big distance of shingle extensions. Found out Certainteed specifies Ĺ inch beyond drip edge, and their reasoning. In most places, our shingles extend l Ĺ inch, although in some places itís more and on one rake it gets down to 1/8 inch and on another ľ inch. Noticed other things that were done contrary to instructions.

    It seemed advisable to find out whatís there, what should be there, whatís important to change, and what doesnít really matter, so Iíll know what to ask the contractor to do. I
    • rented a zoom lens for my camera,
    • read what I could find,
    • sent a collection of photos to an out-of-own roofer who I thought might be willing to give a disinterested opinion and told him Iíd be glad to pay for his time and opinion but never heard back,
    • called Certainteed and asked for a rep to check the roof (see above),
    • called the building inspector (see above) and
    • hired a home inspector and a roofer to do assessments both of which were inaccurate, extremely limited, and, I subsequently learned, missed important things such as the 35 foot completely open gap (except for the drooping shingles that cover the gap) along one eave.
    I have also been looking at the roof myself and gradually coming to really see more of what's in front of my eyes & understand more of what I see (Just yesterday I realized that the soffit along the eave with that completely open space between fascia and sheathing is blocked--there are boards laid across that soffit! They installed the vented soffit then blocked it).


    Yes, this has taken much too long partly because I started from a point of complete ignorance and partly because there are other things in life that Iíve had to deal with that cannot just be put aside while I devote myself to roofing.

    And I have been looking to you guys for information and advice. You have been very generous and very helpful. Thank you so much for taking the time and trouble to educate me.

    Katherine Abernathy

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    St Paul, MN
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    If you're not satisfied with who you've spoken with so far, contact one of these guys.
    Service Areas from the National Roof Certification and Inspection Association

    MinnesotaHomeInspectors.com
    Minnesota Home Inspectors LLC
    ASHI #242887 mnradontesting.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    It sounds like you need to hire an independent private inspector to go over the house from the roof to the foundation. You would then have a list of items that you can hand the builder to correct.

    As nice as the builder is and has been, folks tend to change when it starts impacting their pocketbook!

    You have several good inspectors in your area.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    I serve the Durham Area. You can also go to NCHLIA.com for a listing of inspectors in the greater Triangle area. I can recommend several inspectors in the Durham area if would prefer.

    "The Code is not a peak to reach but a foundation to build from."

  5. #5
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
    Katherine Abernathy Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Thank you very much, Bruce, for your offer to help, and Ken and Scott for your suggestions. I have found a construction/roofing consultant who is local, knowledgeable, and sounds as though he would be very thorough in his examination of the roof. I've sent him an email inquiring if he'd be interested.

    The National Roof Certification and Inspection Association does not yet have people in North Carolina. Certainly sounds like an excellent organization.

    Thank you very much again.

    Katherine


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Vancouver
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Hi Katherine, well not all home inspectors are equal. sad as it sounds some care some are there for the money. you just have to find someone who will listen and learn from what you have seen and then go futher with it. Then once the work is done re inspect it to make sure it is done right. Your contractor wants to do the right thing but to what expense. this is something you will learn too. If he comes thru then you are lucky and hang on to him, hopefully he will learn who he has working for him and what has to be further watched so it don't happen again. Blaming the contractor for someone else's work is easy, but getting them to pay to fix it is the hard part. Good luck with your adventures


  7. #7
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
    Bruce Adams Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Katherine
    Good luck it looks like you are on the right track.
    Bruce Adams


  8. #8
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Have a registered warranty? A Sure-start warranty? a Wind Warranty?Never had CertainTeed refuse to send a representative when a $$$ warranty claim was submitted/registered.C's Arch Shingle Instructions specify cut valleys recommended; except for a few which specify open valleys are recommended, but cut valleys with adjustments are acceptable.No kick-outs present.Installed in winter months, should have gone back and cemented shingles that hadn't adhered in reasonable period of time during spring warm-up period. Pollen and dust likely infiltrated those unadhered tabs. Curling and buckling.You need a mfg qualified Certification inspection.Read your warranty (do you have a registered warranty?) and submit a claim, no one sends someone out on a phone call.Unless your contractor never claims to have finished the roofing installation!11 months is too long for a roof covering installation project to not be complete. If these are AR shingle materials - using aluminum is contra-indicated.Your home owner insurance carrier/agent *might* be able to assist you in locating a certifying roof inspection, or an adjuster.


  9. #9
    Katherine Abernathy's Avatar
    Katherine Abernathy Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Thank you Bill and Bruce for your good wishes and advice.

    HG, by "AR" do you mean architectural? The home inspector said our shingles are laminated fiberglass, and I think Certainteed's Landmark shingles are considered to be architectural shingles.

    Yes, pollen and dust would have entered unadhered places. What are the consequences of that?

    Must the person who comes to inspect the roof actually walk on it or would it be enough for him to use a good zoom lens from the eaves while he stands on a ladder? I was able to see amazing detail with the zoom lens that I rented, and, as of now, the contractor's men are the only people who have ever walked on those shingles, so there's no question now of who damaged the damaged ones. There would be that question, of course, if an inspector were to walk on the shingles.

    Thanks.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Vancouver
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Hi Kartherine, inregards to your last post "Yes, pollen and dust would have entered unadhered places. What are the consequences of that?

    Must the person who comes to inspect the roof actually walk on it or would it be enough for him to use a good zoom lens from the eaves while he stands on a ladder? I was able to see amazing detail with the zoom lens that I rented, and, as of now, the contractor's men are the only people who have ever walked on those shingles, so there's no question now of who damaged the damaged ones. There would be that question, of course, if an inspector were to walk on the shingles.

    Thanks."

    Pollen and dust will prevent the shingle from sticking if there is too much there. they need to simply be reattached with some roofing tar. it like a peice of tape too much dust on it and it does not stick anymore.

    as to the person aka the inspector actually walking on it. depends on the inspector. your photo's should confirm what damage is currently there but more pic's will show other defects if found. Most inspectors are well trained and likelyhood of damage to shingles is not likely during a normal inspection. damage usually occurs when work is being done and tools and materials are being moved around. hope this helps


  11. #11
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
    Richard Pultar Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    rip it off and do it over. your concerns are with fraud and deceit.
    the company is a great talker, they still have your trust??
    You are fool to think any thing they do except replace it is right.
    I hope a clause in your contract specified in a workmanlike manner because you did not get it.You got somthing else , crappy,childlike are words that come to mind. A handyman/ homeowner would probably do better .
    If you paid half the rate for the area for that work you got a reasonable roof job.
    If you paid a reasonable amount you got screwed. I hope you did not pay yet.
    If you did it's probably a expensive mistake, you could live with . That shingle will probably outlive you and your ownership of that house. It looks like a 30 year shingle ,In 2040 will you still care?

    Just for fun I would ask the "you can take it to the bank" contractor to let you see other roof jobs that he sold.


  12. #12
    Bruce Adams's Avatar
    Bruce Adams Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    [quote=Katherine Abernathy;152862]Thank you Bill and Bruce for your good wishes and advice.

    HG, by "AR" do you mean architectural? The home inspector said our shingles are laminated fiberglass, and I think Certainteed's Landmark shingles are considered to be architectural shingles.

    Katherine
    Architectural, laminated, and three-demensional shingle are the same. Architectual shigles or laminate shingles are strip shingles containing more than one layer of tabs to create extra thickness. This is a very good shingle. It is what you want on your home. Do not let anyone put any less on your home. There are better shingles but for the cost the laminate is the best.
    Bruce


  13. #13
    Join Date
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    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
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    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    No, AR as in "algae resistant", i.e. the "streak free" warranty. CertainTeed offers treated shingles in certain colors in certain markets (such as NC) which for a time, at least, deters biological growths.


  14. #14
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Abernathy roof: background & thank you.

    Well, back into it a little. One of the best folks out there than can look at your roof is your insurance company. I can tell you the the perimeter of the roof with the roof open to the attic is not going to fly with the insurance company. If it is not insurable then it is not worth its weight in salt.

    I know HG mentioned the insurance folks. That is one of the best suggestions yet.

    As far as the home inspector I can tell you that most are conscious enough that when they do walk a roof they treat it with care as they know a twist of a foot in warmer weather will heavily damage shingles so they walk about as flat footed as possible and assure good footing before doing so. If the temps are way up there inspectors should not walk on the roof . They can actually leave a foot print in the shingles due to the serious heat when up near or over a 100 degrees.


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