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  1. #1
    Thomas Randall's Avatar
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    Default Shingle Exposure

    Do you think the shingle exposure is too great or was this meant to be the style?

    I've seen the shaded color look before but when intended it usually looks better than this (at least in this poster's opinion).



    The exposure is about 5.5".

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shingle Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Randall View Post
    Do you thinl the shingle exposure is too great or was this meant to be the style? (*See note 1)

    I've seen the shaded color look before but when intended it usually looks better than this (at least in this poster's opinion).



    The exposure is about 5.5". (*see note 2)
    Hello "Thomas Randall" and Welcome. Please complete your profile and introduce yourself. Please tell us who you are and where the heck is "Hartford" in the Big-ol'-world? See leaves on trees in picture - no date stamp - so not "assuming" CT, in USofA, don't make us GUESS, please.

    *Note 1:

    To answer your direct questions, first paragraph: yes wrong, and nope not meant to be installed as shown, exposure wise and/or the "installer's" failure to step pattern and repeat properly.

    *Note 2:
    Regarding your estimation of photographed exposure, I think you're underestimating, and it is not consistant; and for low slope exposure should be further reduced, and most certainly not increased - and the step pattern seaming spacing is likewise often increased in lower-sloped roofs, not decreased, and never non-existant from row or course to row or course.

    Expanding more on Notes 1 & 2:

    Exposed above the "faux shadow line" for example in rows 2, 3 & 4 is a clear indication of overexposure, unless these are factory 2nds or rejects, and therefore unwarranted.

    Shingle pattern was not staggered appropriately, obviously did not follow start pattern as per manufacturer's instructions seams should be staggered with appropriate minimum offset, and without a repeat for at least 3 rows with arch/laminated shingles. You've too-short ends on the gable and this is of course why the pattern looks so odd - this was NOT installed correctly as to staggering, offset, or starting instructions, not even for a less complicated standard 3-tab, let alone laminated or architectual style shingling.

    Also appears to be an extreemly low slope roof - at least from the camera angle. Inappropriately low-sloped for such an exposure or application.

    Unprofessional install not within mfg or association guidelines.

    Course/row one at edge has a slight curl and more pronounced downward slope breaking lower 2/3rds suspect proper starter course not employed.

    You make no mention of having investigating the clearance to the adhesion strip or the distance from edge...this would likely tell you what you need to know for confirmation (unless these have all been additionally sealed down, yet precise measurements would still be necessary. "About" and ambiguous exposure estimates are meaningless IMHO one man's "inch" is another (wo)man's 1/2-inch ( implied possibly inappropriate humor perhaps! IOW I believe your "estimation" on the exposure is shy.). You also make no mention of the slope of the roof deck, so I'll go with what appears to be less than 4/12.

    Measurements or photographing with a guage is often necessary, and even critical, and the sign of a professional documentation means when such "issues" may come into play, especially in areas the client or owner may not reasonably and/or easily access, especially in the critical time-limited decision making period. However, it appears obvious there is variation in the exposure from course/row to course/row, as the exposure from the top of the shadow line is readily apparent in some areas, and not so much in others - and beyond the tolerances for such roofing materials in production - therefore indication of a less-than-ideal installation, how much of a "problem" yet to be determined, however with the non-existant stagger or step pattern lacking - strong odds are that if not failing yet, will soon, and as installed likely voiding any material warranty.

    Questionable roof covering integrity, installation, and/or appropriateness for roof type/slope application. Based upon the limited photo evidence and remarks you have presented here, I'd say more likely than not a completely inexperienced and unqualified DIY type installation by someone who could not or would not read and comprehend the basic instructions included with each and every bundle of materials.


  3. #3
    Thomas Randall's Avatar
    Thomas Randall Guest

    Default Re: Shingle Exposure

    Thank you for that thorough and extensive reply.

    Hartford, my good man, is located in the USA's best and most incredible state of Connecticut. Should you visit some day, I will show you all around. Make a large chuck of time available for such an excursion. It may take a good 20 to 30 minutes.

    Your points are all well taken and I thank you.

    The picture was taken last week during cold weather. The installation is about 20 years old per disclosures. I did not dar lift the shingles for fear of cracking them.

    The total reveal is 5 3/8".
    The shadow area is 1 3/8"

    (I agree with your male female conversion rate ;-))

    Since the reveal would be only 4 inches and that much further away from the adhesion strip, my guess is the reveal is correct.

    I beleive you are correct on your assumption of a DIY install looking at the overall work. I can further support the idea based on the electrical review of this house in that someone thought they knew more than they did. My wiring report section will be longer than an entire report for an average house.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Shingle Exposure

    Exposure may be a little high... should be just above the black shadow (called shadow line shingles). This is probably a metric shingle. Exposure on some of these can be up to 5-5/8". I would say it's in an acceptable range though.

    These are laminated shingles with a layer glued to the layer below, those edges your seeing inthe pics are not the cut edges of the shingles. I am unable to tell the stagger pattern from the pics. Should be about 6-8 inches depending on the manufacturer specs.

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shingle Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
    Exposure may be a little high... should be just above the black shadow (called shadow line shingles). This is probably a metric shingle. Exposure on some of these can be up to 5-5/8". I would say it's in an acceptable range though.

    These are laminated shingles with a layer glued to the layer below, those edges your seeing inthe pics are not the cut edges of the shingles. I am unable to tell the stagger pattern from the pics. Should be about 6-8 inches depending on the manufacturer specs.
    No kidding they are laminated/architectual style faux shadow line shingles!

    Try looking again. Easily seen at full view or up to 150% See esp. rows 1, 3 & 5 you can easily spot the seams they are aligned. Rows 3&5 seams are convienently marked with trapped pine needles.

    The faux shadow lines should not be exposed above the darkened faux shadow lines - this is a lower sloped roof, lower slopes require exposures be slightly reduced, even when using the larger shingles. Check your specs.


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