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  1. #1

    Default Article: Bird?s-Eye View: Why home inspectors are trading apologies for drones

    Hi InspectionNews readers!

    When we started this article, we wanted a better understanding of the role drones play in the home inspection industry. Why are inspectors turning to drones? Are there good and bad times to use drones? And, from our claims data, what's working to protect inspectors from drone-related claims?

    After lots of research and talking to 10 home inspectors, we had A LOT of material. So, we decided to break the topic up into two articles. Here's Part 1 of two in our drone series.

    Best,
    Stephanie



    Bird's-Eye View: Why home inspectors are trading apologies for drones

    This is Part 1 of a two-part series on drone inspections. Be sure to tune in February 15th to learn five ways to avoid drone-related claims.


    Before drones gained popularity in the industry, Jon Bolton of The Inspectagator in Florida had an inspection of a two-story property. He couldn't get up on the roof without an extension ladder, and he didn't carry one.

    So, he called the real estate agent to tell them he would not be able to inspect the roof. The agent replied: "That's not my problem. It's yours. [The client]--he's an attorney and wants the roof looked at. And you've been paid for it."

    After hanging up the phone, Bolton found a friend with an extension ladder and performed the roof inspection. While he was up on the roof, he discovered some significant defects.

    "I was like, 'Thank you, Lord, that this whole thing happened.' Otherwise, [the client] would have moved forward, discovered the roof leaks, and been really [upset]," Bolton said. "And, [since] he's an attorney, he had the ability to make my life miserable."

    Since having that experience several years ago, Bolton has searched for ways to inspect otherwise inaccessible roofs. Rather than apologize for being unable to get to the roof--and running the risk of incurring the second most common type of claim in the industry--Bolton and other inspectors have begun using drones to better serve clients and manage their businesses' risk.

    Learn more about why home inspectors are turning to drones and the pros and cons of drone inspections by clicking "Read More" below.

    [READ MORE]

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Article: Bird?s-Eye View: Why home inspectors are trading apologies for drones

    Let me see if I have this right. You are using an inspector that apparently doesn't even own an extension ladder as an example for using drones? You don't see the business concern there?
    I don't have a problem with a guy not carrying an extension ladder everyday, you don't need one everyday. But to apparently not even own one? That raises questions about what kind of inspector someone is dealing with. Reminds me of a guy around here who doesn't even walk flat roofs because he 'could potentially damage' the roof. Agents love that guy.
    Having to call a friend and borrow an extension ladder also isn't the worst issue. I've had friends borrow my ladders.
    On the flip side, a ladder is a business cost. If the job calls for it, you suck it up, stop by home depot on the way to the inspection and drop the $400 for a 32' extension. The idea that you can't inspect the roof because you don't have an extension ladder is pathetic.
    Of course its all about how different people view customer service, business operations and local expectations.
    Around here if its safe to do so, you get on the roof. If its not safe, its not safe.
    Using an excuse such as not having a ladder isn't going to go over well.

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  3. #3

    Default Re: Article: Bird?s-Eye View: Why home inspectors are trading apologies for drones

    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Keller View Post
    Let me see if I have this right. You are using an inspector that apparently doesn't even own an extension ladder as an example for using drones? You don't see the business concern there?
    I don't have a problem with a guy not carrying an extension ladder everyday, you don't need one everyday. But to apparently not even own one? That raises questions about what kind of inspector someone is dealing with. Reminds me of a guy around here who doesn't even walk flat roofs because he 'could potentially damage' the roof. Agents love that guy.
    Having to call a friend and borrow an extension ladder also isn't the worst issue. I've had friends borrow my ladders.
    On the flip side, a ladder is a business cost. If the job calls for it, you suck it up, stop by home depot on the way to the inspection and drop the $400 for a 32' extension. The idea that you can't inspect the roof because you don't have an extension ladder is pathetic.
    Of course its all about how different people view customer service, business operations and local expectations.
    Around here if its safe to do so, you get on the roof. If its not safe, its not safe.
    Using an excuse such as not having a ladder isn't going to go over well.
    Agreed. Not carrying an extension ladder--and using that as an excuse to not inspect the roof--is a cause for concern. The story is meant to serve as a cautionary tale since the inspector did, in fact, find many defects with the roof after getting a hold of the ladder.

    What we hope people take away from the story is that roof inspections are important and, while roofs can sometimes be difficult to mount, it's important to find a way to inspect them. Ideally, that way is getting your boots on the roof. However, for truly inaccessible roofs, it may be helpful to consider using drones.

    Thanks for the comment. I think the last part is particularly important:

    "Of course its all about how different people view customer service, business operations and local expectations.
    Around here if its safe to do so, you get on the roof. If its not safe, its not safe.
    Using an excuse such as not having a ladder isn't going to go over well."

    InspectorPro Insurance
    We Protect. You Inspect.

    www.inspectorproinsurance.com

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