Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Underlayment

  1. #1
    Jeff Eastman's Avatar
    Jeff Eastman Guest

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    An inspector said:

    "The underlayment has been installed beneath the metal drip edge. The manufacturer requires this on the rake edge of the roof. The underlayment should be installed on top of the drip edge at the downhill side of the roof. "

    I always thought it was the other way around:

    Underlayment UNDER the metal drip edge at eaves.
    Underlayment Over the metal drip edge at rakes
    Depends on where you are at.

    In high wind prone regions (hurricane regions), and in South Florida for sure, the underlayment is under the metal drip edge 'all the way around the roof'. The metal drip edge is set in a bed of roof cement (the better way) or is simply nailed down with a 4" wide bed of roof cement applied over the drip edge / underlayment joint.

    The metal drip edge *is on top* of the underlayment to hold the underlayment edges down during high wind events. This helps prevent the wind from getting in under the underlayment, once the wind gets under the underlayment, the entire roof system just peels right off, like peeling off a band-aid.

    Other areas, however, insist that the only proper way to install drip edge is under the underlayment, other areas insist the only proper way is to install the drip edge over the underlayment along the rakes and under the underlayment along the eave over hang.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Aaron Flook's Avatar
    Aaron Flook Guest

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Jerry nailed it,

    There are exceptions to almost every rule, however, under at rake for wind protection, and over on eave to allow for water to drain over the drip edge and into the gutter.

    Aaron Flook
    AM Inspection Services.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Flook View Post
    Jerry nailed it,

    There are exceptions to almost every rule, however, under at rake for wind protection, and over on eave to allow for water to drain over the drip edge and into the gutter.
    "and over on eave to allow for water to drain over the drip edge and into the gutter"

    Nope, for that same "wind protection" you need to install it UNDER the drip edge to keep it down, AND seal it to keep it from leaking. That is, if you are in a high wind area and the AHJ has any knowledge of high wind conditions and what needs to be done to help keep the roof covering on.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Jerry,

    There are indeed differences regionally. You are absolutely right about the Florida requirements. However, Aaron is also right about requirements at some of the other parts of the country that are non-high wind exposure.

    Take a look at page 3 of 4, top left hand corner detail...


  6. #6
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Ooops... hit'em wront button.

    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Rushing View Post
    There are indeed differences regionally. You are absolutely right about the Florida requirements. However, Aaron is also right about requirements at some of the other parts of the country that are non-high wind exposure.
    I am fully aware of that.

    The reason from my follow up post after Aaron's post was because he said (bold and underlining are mine) "however, under at rake for wind protection, and over on eave".

    "for wind protection"

    For wind protection, it is under at both, with the drip edge being sealed "to allow for water to drain over the drip edge and into the gutter."

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,317

    Default Re: Underlayment

    Richard,

    I forgot to add to my previous post:

    Look at the top left detail on page 4 of 4 pages.

    It shows, starting at the right end: (in order from underneath to on top)
    1) Deck
    2) Underlayment (the white layer)
    3) Drip edge
    4) Eaves flashing (if required)
    5) Shingles

    Those two detail (the one you pointed out and the one I am pointing out) contradict each other.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •