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Thread: Purpose of metal drip edge

  1. #1
    Jeff Eastman's Avatar
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    Default Purpose of metal drip edge

    Last edited by Jeff Eastman; 12-20-2007 at 08:00 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I'd say D......primarily A and B and to a lesser degree C.


  3. #3
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    You forgot 'E'

    e: To assist in preventing soffit damage.

    Richard


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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I would like to add "F"

    To support the end of the shingles and to help prevent them from cracking.

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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    h. A nice rigid straight edge to trim the shingles for a visually appealing appearance.

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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Well there's a shocker.


  7. #7
    John Arnold's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Nick - Are you suggesting the metal drip edge should be bonded to ground?

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  8. #8
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Good one John...

    But no. That's was not a shocker Nick. Actually pretty predicatable.

    Rich


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    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    It's primary purpose is:
    c) to prevent water intrusion. Except change to that 'reduce', not 'prevent', water intrusion.

    add
    z) To help reduce wind uplift damage (when installed properly)

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  10. #10
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    It's primary purpose is:
    c) to prevent water intrusion. Except change to that 'reduce', not 'prevent', water intrusion.

    add
    z) To help reduce wind uplift damage (when installed properly)

    Jerry,
    That's why I wrote:
    e: To assist in preventing soffit damage.


    Richard


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    It is to allow water run-off away from any wooden components and to add support under the edge of the starter row shingle material.


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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    My response was tongue-in-cheek. Should have thrown a in there.


  13. #13
    Richard Stanley's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    If I ever sell my house, I will recommend that the buyers contact Tony, pay for a Texas license for him, and fly him in here to do the inspection.


  14. #14
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Stanley View Post
    If I ever sell my house, I will recommend that the buyers contact Tony, pay for a Texas license for him, and fly him in here to do the inspection.
    Why fly him in?

    (I'm sure that Tony can do the inspection just fine from where he is. )

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  15. #15
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Google Earth...

    RR


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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I actually thought that this whole thread was "tongue in cheek"
    You mean to tell me that the original post actually wanted "real Answers"?

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  17. #17
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Jeff,

    Drip edge flashing is installed under the felt at the drip edge and over the felt at the rake edge. The main purpose is to give water a means of running off the edge without damaging the fascia board and eave. At the drip edge, the DE flashing is suppose to have a 1/4" inch gap (rarely seen) to prevent the trapping of moisture betwen the fascia and flashing.

    Without the DE flashing, rain-water run off will run off the shingle (causes splits) and onto the fascia. Now the water running off the splits and onto the fascia will migrate behind the fascia and into the soffit where extensive damage will occur.

    Additionally in cold climate areas, the drip edge flashing helps with the prevention of ice-damming. As we know, ice-damming is where the ice melts off the roof and re-freezes over the exposed overhangs or areas not over a heated section of the home and then back up under the shingle, causing other damage to the sheathing, insulation and other areas.

    Without drip edge flashing, the perimeter of the home's roof is subjected to possible water damage and ice-damming. Plain and simple.

    Got too much money-- no need for drip edge flashing...
    Like your home-- drip edge flashing is highly desired... irrespective of anyone who says it's for cosmetic purposes.

    Richard

    Last edited by Richard Rushing; 06-29-2007 at 11:01 AM.

  18. #18
    Robert Schenck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Tony Mount, ..... Are you "serious" with the answer (choice) you provided, ... or was that just an alternative choice to throw us off ?


  19. #19
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Everyone-- let's have a show of hands that agrees with the last post...
    (a simple 'agree' will suffice)

    Rich


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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Rushing View Post
    Drip edge flashing is installed under the felt at the drip edge and over the felt at the rake edge.
    Depends.

    In high wind areas, the felt is *under* the drip edge, with the drip edge sealed to the felt.

    This helps keep the wind from getting under the felt and peeling the shingles right off the roof.

    The main purpose is to give water a means of running off the edge without damaging the fascia board and eave.
    Agreed.

    At the drip edge, the DE flashing is suppose to have a 1/4" inch gap (rarely seen) to prevent the trapping of moisture betwen the fascia and flashing.
    In South Florida, a 1/2" gap minimum was required, of the use of a 1x2 furring strip (3/4") 'shingle molding' was used to push the drip edge out further. Haven't looked in a while to see if it's still required (by the Florida Building Code).

    For the reason given.

    Without the DE flashing, rain-water run off will run off the shingle (causes splits) and onto the fascia. Now the water running off the splits and onto the fascia will migrate behind the fascia and into the soffit where extensive damage will occur.
    Yep. That reason.

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  21. #21
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    What I posted and the install requirements are for 90% of all the U.S.

    Yes-- the requirements may differ just a tad for High Velocity Wind Zones, such as South Fla and South Tx.

    Do I take it that you (Jerry) do not agree that drip edge flashing is cosmetic only?

    RR


  22. #22
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Rushing View Post
    Do I take it that you (Jerry) do not agree that drip edge flashing is cosmetic only?

    RR
    Not only that, but I did not respond as his post was not of significance enough to respond to it.

    That what you call a 'no brainer' ... meaning the poster has no ... never mind, we are supposed to be nice here, and there is no 'nice' way to say it.

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  23. #23
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    absolutely, 100%, serious, I challenge anyone to find a shingle manufacture that requires a drip edge on their in stallion instructions. The main purpose of a metal drip edge is to hide the layers of shingles under the layer being installed. Normal maintained and a good quality paint will protect the fascia and soffit from damage. A metal drip edge is a cosmetic item that looks like $#!+ on a new $100,000.00 or more house.
    O.K.-- I'll take that challenge.

    Not only does the Residential Asphalt Roofing Manual (ARMA) illustrate the proper methods of installation (see attachment), this is also taught by Haag Engineering at the Certified Roofing Inspector course, which by the way is one of the premiere roofing courses in the country.

    Please do not lead some unknowing new folks down the wrong path of thinking that this is a cosmetic item. And... I hope you will no longer tell any clients that it is a cosmetic item as well. These folks depend on the inspection community for good reliable information, to make financial decisions and they respond accordingly. Perpetuating the notion that this is a cosmetic item is irresponsible and uneducated at the least.

    Richard Rushing, HCRI

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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Eastman View Post
    Yes, serious question. I never joke. And based on the serious responses, you can see there are different opinions, even what appears to be on the surface, a simple question.

    Thanks for the replies.
    Jeff, I appreciate that you have a serious question. Though there may be different opinions, those that considered no need for drip edges would be incorrect opinions, with a few exceptions. If it's a flat slate roof or some cedar shingles, then no it isn't needed.

    But if you are meaning composition shingles, you will not find support (and neither will Tony) for not applying drip edges. I don't know where Tony got his information, but it's just flat wrong. Go to any composition manufacturer's site and read the instructions. I got 15 references in less than 10 minutes.

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  25. #25
    Richard Moore's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Walker View Post
    But if you are meaning composition shingles, you will not find support (and neither will Tony) for not applying drip edges. I don't know where Tony got his information.......
    Porbably from here, his main reference bible I believe. Where else could you get a line like "The main purpose of a metal drip edge is to hide the layers of shingles under the layer being installed."?

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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I love drip edge. I install it on every roof that I have a hand in. I even install drip edge on the rake edge instead of the cheesey rake edge stuff.

    That said, Tony's correct. It isn't required by any shingle manufacturer that I'm aware of. Most specs indicate 1/2 inch shingle overhangs when drip isn't used.


  27. #27
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Tony, …. So if I understand you right, you’re saying a drip edge is purely cosmetic and serves no other purpose other than to make the house look pretty ? There are a lot of different opinions on here, but they all – with a few variations and simply put, state drip edging is needed.

    You stated: The main purpose of a metal drip edge is to hide the layers of shingles under the layer being installed. Are you referring to the Starter Strip or a second set of shingles all together ? In either case, I believe the drip edge goes underneath the shingles, and in doing this – won’t hide the shingles (1st, 2nd or 3rd set). Drip edges are a form of flashing, and we all know the purpose of flashing.

    A shingle manufacture may not require drip edges be installed, but having it in place certainly helps reduce the possibility of water entry. Actual case in point, … the mother-in-law asked that I over-see the roofers replacing her roof. When there watching roofers, I noticed most sides of the roof had drip edges, one side on the lower eave didn’t. Can you guess which side had sheathing damage ?

    Richard (R) couldn’t have said it any better. After you’ve read the posts on here, I’d ask the same thing as Richard, and to not mislead the unknowing client into believing drip edges are just for pretty looks. I’d at least tell them (client) there is no drip edging and there’s a “possibility” of water intrusion.

    That's my 2-cent opinion.


  28. #28
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    There again I challenge anyone to find a roofing manufacture that requires a metal drip edge. The main point is (Manufacture Requires) Not some Fly by night self certified ASS that thinks they know it all. Now for the responsible highly educated drip edge stock holder that thinks he answered my post and challenge. Have someone that can read with comprehension read my post again and explain to you what is necessary to answer my post correctly. Although metal drip edge is keen product and may serve many useful purposes, it is still used for mainly cosmetic purposes and is NOT REQUIRED for Normal roof installations.
    I think it would be you that may want to brush up your reading skills. Or, you can look at the pretty pictures. Personal insults and adherence to ridiculous beliefs don't make falsehoods true.

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  29. #29
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    Talk about reading skills Thom, ask your 6 year old if there is a differance between REQUIRED and RECOMMEMDED.
    I did. My six year old agrees. You have no idea what you're talking about. I'm not trying to convince you, Tony. If you honestly think that Manufacturer instructions are just recommendations, convincing you isn't going to happen. But, maybe somewhere down the road, Jeff will save himself and his Client some grief by pointing out when drip edges are not present. I'm sure Jeff will decide which approach is right for his business.

    I'm done with this non-issue.

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  30. #30
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    What you guys are missing is that Tony is speaking like a man I worked with for 5 years at a defense plant when I first got out of high school.

    That man, and Tony, would inter-mix flawed theory and factual words and ideas so that anyone 'disputing' him could be set straight on 'the factual word' while being brushed off on the flawed theory being wrong.

    Tony states "required" (factual) and inter-mixes it with "cosmetic" - Tony's flawed theory.

    If you accept Tony's statement at face value, you are continuing to allow Tony's flawed theory to be stated as fact.

    If you denounce Tony's statement at face value, you are stating that the factual word is incorrect, which it is not.

    Thus, there are but three choices:
    1) Ignore Tony's flawed theory statements as if they disappeared into thin air. However, and very unfortunately, they are in print and do not.

    2) Agree with Tony on his factual word, thereby appearing to agree with Tony on his flawed theory. This leaves his flawed theory in print as being 'true', which is no different that 1), except that in 2) you are actually agreeing with Tony, making his flawed theory stand as *backed up * 'fact' - you agreed with him.

    3) Dispute Tony's statement of flawed theory, knowing that he will respond requesting documentation that his factual word is incorrect. You do this to dispel his flawed theory so others do not fall prey to it and believe it, yet, there is no disputing the factual word, which then makes his entire flawed theory seem 'well, then, Tony must be right' to those who are reading this and trying to figure it out.

    No manufacturer "requires" drip edge, however, without drip edge, most manufacturers will claim you did not follow their 'recommendations', thus, their warranty is void. If that is not a back-door way of "requiring" something, I don't know what is.

    Thus, it becomes "required", but no proof can be offered to show Tony, thus leaving that open for others to believe that Tony is correct in his flawed theory statement that drip edge is "cosmetic", and it is not "cosmetic".

    I would spend days and days arguing with the guy I worked with just trying to wear him down and get him to retract his statement. Usually, though, he believed it so much himself that he would not do that, instead, the others around us would just, one-by-one, walk away shaking their head, knowing that the guy making the claim was wrong.

    That is all we can do here, keep repeating to Tony that he is wrong, hoping that the other readers will understand that Tony is wrong, then walk away one-by-one ... with the knowledge that Tony is wrong and that drip edge *IS NOT* "cosmetic". And that it is "required" by virtue that if you do not install it, the manufacturer will void their warranty.

    Is that not "requiring" it? Yes, it is.
    Can you document it in writing? No.

    Does that make Tony wrong? Yes. it does.

    By the way, Tony, find any more diamond rings lately?

    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 06-30-2007 at 02:06 PM.
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  31. #31
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I absolutely will have fun in court. You see, unlike yourself, I *AM* considered an expert witness in the field of roof installations. I can, and will, assist any homeowner/ buyer who goes after negligent people who have been taught the right way and refuse to do it right or inspect to the right install methods.

    You can no longer say that you were not informed or did not know the right way of doing an install because this forum has provided you with several installation instructions and recommendations. Your choosing to ignore them are troubling to say the least. It is you who are opening yourself up to litigation and after reading your posts above, I look forward to sitting across the courtroom on opposing sides having to reveal my creditentials and then you, yours....

    Tony stated: OK, anyone that does not believe the way I do should require repairs on any house that DOES NOT have a metal drip edge installed. The roof installation should be considered defective and not properly installed by manufactures requirements, and the home owner forced to repair it. Put your belief where your mouth is. Have Fun in court.

    Well, you/I/we can't force anyone to do anything as far as repairs go. We can inform our client what they are getting into-- Let the client know what is right and wrong so *THEY* can make decisions (monetary and otherwise) based on an informed position.

    Yes... I will write it up as "In Need of Repair" when a composition shingle roof is missing drip edge or the drip-edge flashing is damaged or displaced.

    Have fun defending your position of this being a cosmetic item...

    Rich



  32. #32
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Tony, … Depending on what neck of the woods (state) you live in, some states REQUIRE drip edging per the IRC (2006) 903.2.2 code. You might want to check with “your” state to see what the requirements are. The one listed below is from Westminster, Colorado. (I use to live on the border of Westminster and Northglenn – I loved it and still miss it today). Anyway, ……

    Drip Edge.

    • Drip edge shall be provided at eaves and gables of shingle roofs. Overlap shall be a minimum of 2”. Eave drip edges shall extend .25” below sheathing and extend back on the roof a minimum of 2”. Drip edge shall be mechanically fastened a maximum of 12” on center. (Section R903.2.2)

    Without having gone into an exhaustive search, I have yet to find a roof manufacture state drip edging is REQUIRED. And to answer your comment on behalf of Thom’s 6 year old, yes; there is a difference between required and recommended. With that said, drip edging (even though nor required by the manufacture) and as you should know, serves a valuable purpose, and that’s to help prevent (reduce) water intrusion.

    If the shingle hangs over the sheathing by a sufficient amount, there’s probably no need for drip edging. Here in Ontario, I’ve seen shingles hang almost half way into the gutter (with and without drip edging). But in the case where the shingle hangs over by an inch or less, I would say (recommend to the client) that drip edging be installed. Why would I recommend that ? Because, from experience, I’ve seen sheathing damage from the LACK OF drip edging.

    As per your comments on here, if the house didn’t have drip edging, I would NOT write it up as a REQUIRED repair, but rather a RECOMMENDED repair (depending on the roof configuration). Now you do know the difference between Required and Recommended, … right ?

    Your point about manufactures not requiring a drip edge is probably valid, but your challenge to have someone prove you wrong is unwarranted. You seem to take the posts on here too too personal. To me, it’s just a common sense issue. If you’re looking for someone to find where the manufacture REQUIRES drip edging be installed, …. You might be in for a long wait. But, as mentioned, some states DO require drip edging, … as I managed to find in Colorado. So who supercedes who ? And yes, there is a difference between a manufactures and states requirements, ….. that’s a given.

    So in short, to answer your question, …. No, I have yet to date see a manufacture require drip edging. Does that mean it shouldn’t be used ? NO !!!!

    If you feel drip edging is purely cosmetic, and if you see, and I’m sure you (should) have, damage near the fascia / sheathing, ….. How do you explain that to your clients ?


  33. #33
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Jerry, ….. Did you take English / Psychology 101 in college ? You have a way with words. Well put I must say.

    Richard, …. If we’re ever in court together, can I be on your side of the room ?


  34. #34
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I have not seen a metal drip flashing on new construction in my area in the past two years of inspections. Normally the shingles dump into the gutters as needed and no problem. Just my recent observations...your mileage my vary.


  35. #35
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Schenck View Post
    Tony, …

    Your point about manufactures not requiring a drip edge is probably valid, but your challenge to have someone prove you wrong is unwarranted. You seem to take the posts on here too too personal.
    Robert,

    Tony may (or may not) be taking the comments too personal.

    What I (and other here who have read Tony's comments over the years) can tell you about Tony is that he professes that to do more than the absolute minimum 'required' in anything, hence this discussion regarding 'required' drip edge, is 'more than is needed' and 'puts one forth into legal harms way' simply because one has 'exceeded' "minimum' standards.

    That is Tony's way ... 'absolute minimum' ... nothing more ... and less if it can be gotten away with.

    It is unfortunate that there is one Tony in the Home Inspection Profession, and even more unfortunate that Tony M. is not 'the only' "Tony" out there.

    Regarding my English, never went to college and squeaked past English in high school. I hated it. I found out that it helped get the teachers off your back if you turned papers in, so I did ... blank paper with my name and date on it. I found out that did NOT 'help'.

    Oh well, I gradumacated and got that piece o' paper which said I 'done okay'.

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  36. #36
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    From the IRC.

    Does this require drip edge?

    a) Yes
    b) No
    c) Both a) and b)
    d) none of the above

    (bold and underlining are mine)
    - R903.2 Flashing.
    Flashings shall be installed in a manner that prevents moisture from entering the wall and roof through joints in copings, through moisture permeable materials and at intersections with parapet walls and other penetrations through the roof plane.

    - - R903.2.1 Locations.
    Flashings shall be installed at wall and roof intersections, wherever there is a change in roof slope or direction and around roof openings. Where flashing is of metal, the metal shall be corrosion resistant with a thickness of not less than 0.019 inch (0.5 mm) (No. 26 galvanized sheet).

    My question is: Does not the "roof plane" stop at the eaves and rakes? Does not the "roof slope or direction" "change" at the eaves and rakes? Does not the code "require" "flashings" at those locations?

    My answer: c)



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  37. #37
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    By the way, I have been having discussions similar to this with an electrical contractor regarding boxes which come with a support on the non-mounting side (the support is a bracket which is designed to rest against the drywall on the back side of a 2x4 stud wall) regarding installing additional support when those boxes are used in 2x6 stud walls and the support brace is too short to reach the drywall on the back of the wall.

    The manufacturer's installation instructions state that adding a phantom stud there will increase the rigidity of the mounting (the code uses the term 'rigidly' mounted). However, their next sentence states that this is not required.

    Gee, thanks a lot guys.

    I had the manufacturer call me on Wednesday and we discussed this. He stated that, while the listing does not require that bracket for support, it is left up to the interpretation of the inspector in the field, and most inspectors are requiring that bracket for proper rigid support.

    Gee, thanks a lot. (Actually, though, what he said backed me up - that is was up to me ... the inspector in the field ... to make that interpretation and call as to whether or not it meets the wording and intent of the code - "rigidly" - .)

    314.23 Supports.
    Enclosures within the scope of this article shall be supported in accordance with one or more of the provisions in 314.23(A) through (H).
    (A) Surface Mounting. An enclosure mounted on a building or other surface shall be rigidly and securely fastened in place. If the surface does not provide rigid and secure support, additional support in accordance with other provisions of this section shall be provided.
    (B) Structural Mounting. An enclosure supported from a structural member of a building or from grade shall be rigidly supported either directly or by using a metal, polymeric, or wood brace.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  38. #38
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    I normally add a block behind all boxes greater than single gang. It don't' move then. Takes a minute plus the box is spaced properly for the drywall.


  39. #39
    Richard Moore's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by James Duffin View Post
    I have not seen a metal drip flashing on new construction in my area in the past two years of inspections. Normally the shingles dump into the gutters as needed and no problem. Just my recent observations...your mileage my vary.
    James, actually that brings up an interesting point. I agree that drip edge or starter metal is rare on new construction or even re-roofs at the eaves. As long as there is the appropriate overhang, the shingles themselves form an effective "drip edge". Water won't run uphill back to the decking. I don't call those. But...I've been assuming the discussion is about drip edge flashing at the rake ends of gable and shed roofs. (?) Water can seep back along the underside of the shingles there and it's very rare around here not to see drip edge flashing at the rakes on professional installs.


  40. #40
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Mount View Post
    I think that most of the inspectors on this forum knows what is important to their customers and what is normal. To go beyond the SOP may lead to unnecessary expectations of the buyer and unrealistic burdens to the seller, which the home inspector IS LIBLE.
    Tony,

    Thank you for once again reiterating your do-nothing-more-than-minimum position. I can some did not believe me when I stated it, you so kindly re-stated it.

    Thank you.

    To do nothing-more-than-the-minimum is the sure fire way to become liable for things not done.

    I am also sure that, as you said, your 'inspection skills are second to none', just as I am sure that you are working on being 'the nonest' at the bottom ... however, most inspectors try to be 'the best they can be', not 'the nonest possible'.

    (Hey, did I just create a new word - "nonest"?)

    By the way ... "LIBLE" is incorrect spelling, but, then again, if does fit your style, doesn't it.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  41. #41
    Mike Schulz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    90% of the homes here don't have drip. They are using it now and works much better with gable and eave trim metal (vinyl siding). The metal slips up under the drip. I don't call out missing drip edge. Certain cases I have because of other reasons then It "should have been installed". If it was a big problem I would be all over it, but since I have literally taken 1,000 of old roofs off, and don't see the alarm for it "here".

    Mike Schulz License 393
    Affordable Home Inspections
    www.houseinspections.com

  42. #42
    Brian M Jones's Avatar
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    Wink Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Been lurking here a few years now and obviously I dont say much. I am a semi-retired contractor, or trying to be semi-retired, I only work 7 days a week now.
    I digress. Here in Ontario, the Building code explicitly states that a drip edge is required on all new construction. It is not for cosmetic purpose's as someone erroneously stated, as it is the opinion of many, myself included, that metal drip-edge is not the prettiest thing to add to your house. That being said, I will NOT re-roof a house without adding drip-edge. It's benefits far outweigh any perceived cosmetic issues.

    Tony M mentions something about manufacturer's reccomendation versus "required". If anyone simply reads the installation instructions from the manufaturer, they will find that the drip-edge is reccomended. This to me is tantamount to saying "required". Any warranty is void if you dont follow the reccomendation of the manufacturer. Those same instructions state that whe warranty is void if the roof structure and sheathing are not in as-new condition. An example: I recently reshingled 2 roofs with hemlock planking instead of OSB or other plywood as the sheathing. Even though I renailed the planking, the shingle manufacturer could claim their reccomendations weren't followed in the event of failure of the shingles.
    Nuff said for now


  43. #43
    Jerry Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Purpose of metal drip edge

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M Jones View Post
    An example: I recently reshingled 2 roofs with hemlock planking instead of OSB or other plywood as the sheathing. Even though I renailed the planking, the shingle manufacturer could claim their reccomendations weren't followed in the event of failure of the shingles.
    Welcome to the board Brian ... as a participant.

    However, *IF* the sheathing you installed is structurally as strong as the sheathing it was used to replace (both in applied load perpendicular to the plane of the roof and in applied wind/snow/other loads applied to the structure of the roof), then the shingle manufacturer should not having anything negative to say about it.

    One could, in fact, re-sheath an entire roof BETTER than it was originally constructed, there would be nothing wrong with that either.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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