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  1. #1
    Van Phan's Avatar
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    Default JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Hi, anyone here have experiences with this JAWS 26' ladder? It is similar to LG 26' model M-26. I am thinking of buying one (either LG or JAWS) so it could fit in my station wagon.

    Thank you for any input.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Thank you Mr. Miller for your reply, I think I will go for the JLT26, but a little concern about the plastic latch on the JLT26, I am not sure how durable it is. Little Giant used stainless steel for the latch instead.

    Thanks again.

    Van,


  3. #3
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    I have three Jaws ladders which I have been using daily since 1997. I have never had one single part break - ever - and I weigh about 225 lbs.
    Ditto here. That is, I also like the Jaws. (No ditto on that other stuff, I'm a lightweight. )

    The plastic pins are good, and they never need oil. The Jaws is mucho lighter and yet stiffer when set up. Squeeze the jaws together with one hand, spin a wing nut with the other, the ladder is locked and ready. Need more height? Lift and lock the side pins.

    I leave the top section of my 22' (actually 19') in the truck. It is redundant for a lot of jobs and makes the ladder easy to pack under one arm. With the top section off, the ladder is smooth on one side, slides into the truck with one hand. I love it.

    Oh yeah, the feet slip on plastic decking. Be careful. I don't even have the side pins locked in that second pic. My bad. Recycled plastic deck planks, I caught the roof to stop from sliding.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Thank you John, I will go and get one today.


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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    I have the 26 foot Little Giant, have had it probably 10-15 years. Never a problem with it ... except for the fact that a 26 foot ladder is right at my reach with regards to its balance point, and if it starts to go ... there is no way I am going to be able to stop it ... ... just a word of caution on those 26 foot ladders.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Ditto here. That is, I also like the Jaws. (No ditto on that other stuff, I'm a lightweight. )

    The plastic pins are good, and they never need oil. The Jaws is mucho lighter and yet stiffer when set up. Squeeze the jaws together with one hand, spin a wing nut with the other, the ladder is locked and ready. Need more height? Lift and lock the side pins.

    I leave the top section of my 22' (actually 19') in the truck. It is redundant for a lot of jobs and makes the ladder easy to pack under one arm. With the top section off, the ladder is smooth on one side, slides into the truck with one hand. I love it.

    Oh yeah, the feet slip on plastic decking. Be careful. I don't even have the side pins locked in that second pic. My bad. Recycled plastic deck planks, I caught the roof to stop from sliding.

    In both those pictures the ladders are way to straight up and down. Kick those bottoms back so when you stand with your toes at the base of the ladder you have at least 4 feet to reach and grab the ladder with your hands.

    Ted Menelly, Castle Home Inspection Services
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    I've been up and down ladders for thirty+ years. In my advice buy a type 1A ladder. It's worth the money just for the security. Don't play around 26' in the air. Be sure to follow the safety rules which are.

    Laddar must be three feet above the landing.
    Have a good footing.
    Locks in place and hooks, hooked.
    Make sure the ladder extension guides are working.
    Must be at a four to one ratio. That is: 1 ft away from house for every 4 ft verticle.
    Must be tied off.


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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    As I get older ladders scare me more every time I get on them. I don't care what the situation with a ladder. If I get to the roof point with the ladder , hooks or not, tied off or not, if it don't feel right I do not go to the roof from the ladder. Sometimes there is just that feeling that tells one to just get your look from the eves and be satisfied with it and inform the buyer where the roof was inspected from. Take as many pictures as you can from the eves. Sometimes a picture will show you more than if you got on that higher steeper roof. 26 feet can and maybe will kill you. Either that or mess you up for a long time down the road.

    Ted Menelly, Castle Home Inspection Services
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    In both those pictures the ladders are way too straight up and down. Kick those bottoms back so when you stand with your toes at the base of the ladder you have at least 4 feet to reach and grab the ladder with your hands.
    Acknowledged.
    The ladder in the first pic is too short. I should have brought a longer one that day, condo inspection, wasn't planning on ladder use.
    In the second pic, I have moved my ladder to a straighter position after the hard plastic feet slipped on the hard plastic deck. In the position shown, the feet did not slip and I was able to make it onto the roof and off again. But you are correct, ladder angle is important.

    Here's a pic from this AM, how am I doing?

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Here's a pic from this AM, how am I doing?
    Better but still wrong. The ladder needs to extend 3 feet above the roof line. You have enough ladder to extend it more.

    The angle still seems steep. Put your feet at the bottom where the ladder meets the ground. Extend you arms out. Your hands should just touch the ladder. If you have to bend your arms, to straight. If you have to bend at the waist or lean over to touch, too flat.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Ramsey View Post
    Better but still wrong. The ladder needs to extend 3 feet above the roof line. You have enough ladder to extend it more.
    3' above the the eave of a pitched roof is dangerous IMO. I believe that's an OSHA requirement for flat roofs. Regardless, trying to get on and off the ladder from the side of a pitched roof is awkward. It shifts the center of gravtiy away from the center of the ladder. I extend the ladder ideally 1 to 2 rungs above the edge so I can step more or less over the ladder top.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Using a stand out on steep slope roofing is safer. It also fulfills the osha standard of "3 ft" above the eve because it is a grab hold. Work safe out there guys.


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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Ramsey View Post
    Better but still wrong. The ladder needs to extend 3 feet above the roof line. You have enough ladder to extend it more.

    The angle still seems steep. Put your feet at the bottom where the ladder meets the ground. Extend you arms out. Your hands should just touch the ladder. If you have to bend your arms, to straight. If you have to bend at the waist or lean over to touch, too flat.
    Good one. I posted that pic to see if it would trigger the proper response.
    I'm aware of the 3 foot or 3 rung rule, but the ladder starts to get springy as you extend that one more section.
    #2 The angle is too steep. This puts less pressure on the gutter. When I did the other side, the stinking gutter started spilling swamp water while I was going up. But you're all right, it should be safety first. No, I did not walk this roof.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Lamb View Post
    3' above the the eave of a pitched roof is dangerous IMO. I believe that's an OSHA requirement for flat roofs. Regardless, trying to get on and off the ladder from the side of a pitched roof is awkward. It shifts the center of gravtiy away from the center of the ladder. I extend the ladder ideally 1 to 2 rungs above the edge so I can step more or less over the ladder top.

    That is the same way I set my ladder up, so I can go straight up and over the top and not have to "go around" the top of the ladder - that is just to dangerous for me - I have never liked "going around" the top of a ladder.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    That is the same way I set my ladder up, so I can go straight up and over the top and not have to "go around" the top of the ladder - that is just to dangerous for me - I have never liked "going around" the top of a ladder.
    That's very interesting. I've tried both and over the tops seems more scary to me, like you can catch your foot on the top rung and go flying, yikes.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Well, getting down is far more dangerous than going up. I know cats have that problem with trees.

    The first step over the edge is the most important. I want my hand firmly grasping that top rung of the ladder for balance and stability, and my center of gravity to be as close to the ladder's center of gravity as possible.

    If there is a time during an inspection to focus on what you are doing, this is it. In short, don't fall.


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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    I step over the ladder as well. And on the way down, I grasp both the ladder and gutter with the same hand-- it keeps the ladder from sliding on the gutter.


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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    ... so I can go straight up and over the top and not have to "go around" the top of the ladder - that is just to dangerous for me - I have never liked "going around" the top of a ladder.
    Yes, especially a LG because of the way it flairs out, it can be awkward.

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  19. #19
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Klampfer View Post
    Yes, especially a LG because of the way it flairs out, it can be awkward.
    Good point, I think that is the key actually. The flair is right there in the way.
    The Little Giant style forces you over the top, pushing down on the top of the ladder above the pivot point is not safe, but you are foced to do that. Be careful up there.

    I mostly use either my narrow extension ladder or my Jaws with the flair taken off. I take hold of the upper end which is well above the eave but keep the weight on my feet, come down around the ladder to the eave. I place my first foot on a rung below the gutter, so my weight is pushing down on that part, not above the pivot. I often have the ladder hooked to the gutter with a bungy cord, and that is a big help. HI Jim Katen uses visegrips to clamp the ladder edge to the gutter, but I'd be leaving them in the truck all the time. The bungy usually comes with the ladder, unless it gets left in the truck, that is.

    Re; tying off, yes that is ideal, but not usually practical for home inspection, but I'd be interested to see who uses rope?

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Good point, I think that is the key actually. The flair is right there in the way.
    The Little Giant style forces you over the top, pushing down on the top of the ladder above the pivot point is not safe, but you are foced to do that. Be careful up there.

    I mostly use either my narrow extension ladder or my Jaws with the flair taken off. I take hold of the upper end which is well above the eave but keep the weight on my feet, come down around the ladder to the eave. I place my first foot on a rung below the gutter, so my weight is pushing down on that part, not above the pivot. I often have the ladder hooked to the gutter with a bungy cord, and that is a big help. HI Jim Katen uses visegrips to clamp the ladder edge to the gutter, but I'd be leaving them in the truck all the time. The bungy usually comes with the ladder, unless it gets left in the truck, that is.

    Re; tying off, yes that is ideal, but not usually practical for home inspection, but I'd be interested to see who uses rope?
    Being an old fart the only thing you should do with the rope is tie it around your neck in case you fall from 26 feet or higher. Falling at your age is gonna bust you up. You may as well just end it quick with the rope just short enough so your feet do not hit the ground when you do fall. You will still break your neck but it will be the last time

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    Being an old fart the only thing you should do with the rope is tie it around your neck in case you fall from 26 feet or higher. Falling at your age is gonna bust you up. You may as well just end it quick with the rope just short enough so your feet do not hit the ground when you do fall. You will still break your neck but it will be the last time
    Good to see you're feeling better.

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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Menelly View Post
    You may as well just end it quick with the rope just short enough so your feet do not hit the ground when you do fall. You will still break your neck but it will be the last time
    but then it'll look suicide and your wife won't get any insurance money

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  23. #23
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    I tried to set up this ladder (JLT-26) today, It was difficult to set it up with the full extension due to it's weight. I think to set up this ladder to inspect a 19' roof will require at-least two people. I have 5'11, >180lb frame but still not able to do it myself.

    I am about to give up with this ladder, any suggestion on setting up the ladder?

    Thanks,

    Van...


  24. #24
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Phan View Post
    I tried to set up this ladder (JLT-26) today, It was difficult to set it up with the full extension due to it's weight. I think to set up this ladder to inspect a 19' roof will require at-least two people. I have 5'11, >180lb frame but still not able to do it myself.

    I am about to give up with this ladder, any suggestion on setting up the ladder?

    Thanks,

    Van...
    I am 5'6" and 190 pounds ... and I can set up my 26 foot Little Giant by myself, albeit not as easily as I could 10-15 years ago.

    This is what I did: I used a flat metal strap and strapped a pulley to the top rung of one side, tied a rope to the bottom fixed rung/horizontal brace on that side, tied the other end to the bottom extension rung on that side.

    To open the ladder I hold it in front of me, push in the locking pins and walk the ladder open to the full open height.

    Then I carry the ladder and position it near where I want it, making sure the rope end is down.

    I plant the down legs where I want the ladder, walk the top extension out to its maximum, then walk the ladder vertical. You should be able to do this easier than I can as I can barely reach the balance point, you are enough taller that you should easily be able to reach past the balance point.

    I then hold the ladder vertically and use the rope to extend (raise) the bottom half of the ladder to the extension I need (usually all the way) - just like extending a regular extension ladder with its rope.

    Taking down is the reverse, but trickier as I can barely reach the balance point to keep the ladder from flipping over my head - you should be able to have more control of the ladder and that part should not be so hard for you to do, then I walk the ladder back out fully extended (except the bottom half), walk the top half back in, then lower the ladder to the ground sideways. From this vantage point I release the locking pins, lay the ladder over flat, and then raise the center point of the ladder to the smallest 'A' frame it makes, and then just man-handle it back to where I keep it.

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  25. #25
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Thank you Jerry for your reply,

    But after extended this ladder with rope at the bottom, how are you going to locked it with the two latches in the air? Sorry, I may have difficulty to picture what you said.

    Thanks again.

    Van


  26. #26
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Phan View Post
    Thank you Jerry for your reply,

    But after extended this ladder with rope at the bottom, how are you going to locked it with the two latches in the air? Sorry, I may have difficulty to picture what you said.

    Thanks again.

    Van
    Hello Van. I'm pretty sure you can reach a latch of the lower section with one hand while holding the rope or the rungs with the other. The upper section you extend and latch before setting up.
    I set up my 22' that same way, and it takes some effort to push the ladder up in the vertical position. And you want to plant your feet, keep it all balanced so you don't smash anything. I imagine the 26' is a major grunt.

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  27. #27
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Re; tying off, yes that is ideal, but not usually practical for home inspection, but I'd be interested to see who uses rope?
    I always use a bungy and either clip it onto the flashing for flat roofs, or clip it onto the eave for sloped roof. It's not something you could hang off, but if will generally hold the ladder in place. Most importantly it will keep the ladder from blowing over if there is a wind gust.


  28. #28
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Phan View Post
    I tried to set up this ladder (JLT-26) today, It was difficult to set it up with the full extension due to it's weight. I think to set up this ladder to inspect a 19' roof will require at-least two people. I have 5'11, >180lb frame but still not able to do it myself.

    I am about to give up with this ladder, any suggestion on setting up the ladder?

    Thanks,

    Van...
    I have used this exact same model ladder almost daily for the last 5 years. To set it up I simply turn it on its side and extend to proper height while it's on the ground. After locking the rungs I brace the end against the side of the building, sidewalk, or whatever is available and walk it into place from underneath. I am 5'7 and 160lb

    It might be more difficult if there is an overhang on the roof edge you are trying to access, but pretty much anything as simple as a concrete paver or a sturdy wooden post can be used to give you something to brace against. Small overhangs aren't really a problem as you can can muscle the bottom of the ladder out into place without too much trouble.

    I find the ladder extremely useful and convenient as I can access 90% of the buildings without needing to carry a 32' extension ladder. Here is a tip - if you don't need the full height keep the partially collapsed section to the ground to give your ladder a lower centre of gravity.

    Last edited by roof1_canada; 08-16-2010 at 07:59 PM.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Without stand-aways how are all of you avoiding bending the hell out of the Al gutters? That along with the reverse-curve gutters protectors that seem to becoming the norm and come with instructions not to lean a ladder against it. I grew up with a forty-foot wood extension ladder and could handle it by myself by the time I was fourteen. I have often wondered why the al and fiberglass ladders supplanted them. Any ideas?


  30. #30
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Without stand-aways how are all of you avoiding bending the hell out of the Al gutters? That along with the reverse-curve gutters protectors that seem to becoming the norm and come with instructions not to lean a ladder against it. I grew up with a forty-foot wood extension ladder and could handle it by myself by the time I was fourteen. I have often wondered why the al and fiberglass ladders supplanted them. Any ideas?
    Maybe because the wood rots and decays. Therefore if you step on a rotted out rung...Goodbye.


  31. #31
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe S View Post
    Maybe because the wood rots and decays. Therefore if you step on a rotted out rung...Goodbye.
    Maybe, but for trades that used ladders daily they knew when to go get a new one. If they were hung on the side of a garage and just used for a yearly gutter cleaning then maybe rot was a problem. I still think they were the best of the ladders. But maybe I am just being nostalgic. Any other really old guys who grew up with wood ladders please chip in.


  32. #32
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Without stand-aways how are all of you avoiding bending the hell out of the Al gutters? That along with the reverse-curve gutters protectors that seem to becoming the norm and come with instructions not to lean a ladder against it. I grew up with a forty-foot wood extension ladder and could handle it by myself by the time I was fourteen. I have often wondered why the al and fiberglass ladders supplanted them. Any ideas?
    My experience with wooden ladders is limited to the occasional use, usually where they've been stored away in a mechanical room where they've been sitting for the past 30 years. Besides the fact they are wood which is not as wear or weather resistant as other materials, they are heavy as hell. I wouldn't want to lug one of those things around all day. Can't even imagine trying to carry a 40' upright.


  33. #33
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by roof1_canada View Post
    My experience with wooden ladders is limited to the occasional use, usually where they've been stored away in a mechanical room where they've been sitting for the past 30 years. Besides the fact they are wood which is not as wear or weather resistant as other materials, they are heavy as hell. I wouldn't want to lug one of those things around all day. Can't even imagine trying to carry a 40' upright.
    It is a matter of balance. I do not know what kind of wood ladder you experienced, but like I said I could get one up and carry it vertically with no problem. I have never, maybe once and it took me forever, to get a forty foot al ladder up and in place by myself. My daddy could leave a wood ladder (I don't think he ever owned any other) fully extended, walk it to the wires, lower it and clear and swing it back up.


  34. #34
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip View Post
    Without stand-aways how are all of you avoiding bending the hell out of the Al gutters?
    I think I use a slightly steeper angle, so less weight is tranferred to the gutter. Plus I'm a relative lightweight, 168 lbs last time I checked.
    I grew up with a forty-foot wood extension ladder and could handle it by myself by the time I was fourteen. I have often wondered why the Al and fiberglass ladders supplanted them. Any ideas?
    Well where's your woody now, Phillip? Behind the barn under a pile of leaves, maybe.
    I know why we don't use wood no more, it's because we don't grow them kinda trees no more. You'd have to use finger-jointed Spruce or whatever species you'all used down there. Then when that ladder's been out in the rain for a year or two you'd be climbing a pile of firewood.

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  35. #35
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    Default Re: JLT 26' Ladder (JAWS or featherlite"

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    I think I use a slightly steeper angle, so less weight is tranferred to the gutter. Plus I'm a relative lightweight, 168 lbs last time I checked. Well where's your woody now, Phillip? Behind the barn under a pile of leaves, maybe.
    I know why we don't use wood no more, it's because we don't grow them kinda trees no more. You'd have to use finger-jointed Spruce or whatever species you'all used down there. Then when that ladder's been out in the rain for a year or two you'd be climbing a pile of firewood.
    Good thinking. I have been telling people for years that they don't make wood like they used to, and I would get the vacant stare. I just forgot to apply it to the wood that was used in the wood ladders. Now I understand.


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