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Thread: brick movement

  1. #1
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    Default brick movement

    What typically causes brick to drop like at this corner? Just this upper corner above the roof - no issues below it.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Looks like lack of support and the flashing has probably compromised any structural integrity that was to be had.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall Clark View Post
    What typically causes brick to drop like at this corner? Just this upper corner above the roof - no issues below it.
    RC: As JL alluded to it is a structural issue. The support detail for brick-on-roof installation is one that is often botched by today's "carpenters".

    Depending on the age of the home, whatever settlement is going to happen due to poor framing techniques, has happened. In my area the three 2X6s that should underly this mess are required to be pressure-treated material, lag-screwed as per the code. What I usually find is untreated material nailed into place. Sometimes they even leave out the steel angle.

    Even if they used treated wood, that wood has a tendency to shrink more than the untreated lumber, thus causing movement over time. Combined with poorly fitting joints, a lot of movement can be experienced.

    Repair of the bricks and flashing should make things look better, assuming you don't hire someone from the original builder or contractor.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Randall

    Is this a double brick house?


  5. #5
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    Default Re: brick movement

    If those bricks don't extend all of the way down to the foundation, but instead bear on a wood header below the roof/wall line, then my guess would be possible rot in the header. It looks like the flashing is newer, and the roof leader discharges in the immediate area, so rot would be a possibility.

    If the brick extends down to the foundation, and there are no cracks in the foundation below this area, my next guess would be lack of expansion joints in the brick (which is rarely a problem in relatively small houses).

    Are there cracks on the interior in this area, any sign of water damage on the interior...?


  6. #6
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    Default Re: brick movement

    That "flashing" is crap. Who know what you'll see when your peel that away.


  7. #7
    Michael Garrity's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    [IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/MICHAEL/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg[/IMG][IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/MICHAEL/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg[/IMG]AD, I am looking at the picture in your post.What holds the steel angle in place on a steep slope?


  8. #8
    Richard A Hetzel's Avatar
    Richard A Hetzel Guest

    Default Re: brick movement

    Therer used to be a clause in the building code that required masonry to be supported on either steel or masonry. Brick supported by wood would not have conformed. If that clause is no longer in the code, whoever took it out should fall victim to a masonry collapse.


  9. #9
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    gravity


  10. #10
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Garrity View Post
    [IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/MICHAEL/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg[/IMG][IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/MICHAEL/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg[/IMG]AD, I am looking at the picture in your post.What holds the steel angle in place on a steep slope?
    MG: A steel angle lag-screwed to the underlying 2X6s.


  11. #11
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Frederickson View Post
    If those bricks don't extend all of the way down to the foundation, but instead bear on a wood header below the roof/wall line, then my guess would be possible rot in the header. It looks like the flashing is newer, and the roof leader discharges in the immediate area, so rot would be a possibility.

    If the brick extends down to the foundation, and there are no cracks in the foundation below this area, my next guess would be lack of expansion joints in the brick (which is rarely a problem in relatively small houses).

    Are there cracks on the interior in this area, any sign of water damage on the interior...?
    Steve and Aaron have very good points. We see condition like this all the time out in California. bad Installations from the 50s 60s and even up to date. No bottom supports for the veneer.

    Santa Rosa California Home Inspection - Exterminating & Thermal Imaging
    Santa Rosa California Home Inspection - Exterminating & Thermal Imaging

    Best

    Ron


  12. #12
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Randal did not answer the question whether this is a double brick home or whether its a newer brick veneer with reclaimed brick.

    This damage may have been caused by improper roof water management spilling in this area and freeze thaw cycles.


  13. #13
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    Randal did not answer the question whether this is a double brick home or whether its a newer brick veneer with reclaimed brick.

    This damage may have been caused by improper roof water management spilling in this area and freeze thaw cycles.
    From what I can see in the photo its a Face Veneer. Look at the door opening.

    Santa Rosa California Home Inspection - Exterminating & Thermal Imaging

    Best

    Ron


  14. #14
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    Default Re: brick movement

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    Randal did not answer the question whether this is a double brick home or whether its a newer brick veneer with reclaimed brick.

    This damage may have been caused by improper roof water management spilling in this area and freeze thaw cycles.
    Thanks for all of the replies. It is veneer on a 2-yr old home. Buyer had it repaired although I do not know how it was done.


  15. #15
    Richard A Hetzel's Avatar
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    Default Re: brick movement

    If it were built with the steel angle as pictured a few psots back, it's possible that the bond between mortar and steel gave way, and that the bricks simply slid down the steel angle slightly, which would have produced the effect shown. The veneer ties would have prevented a total collapse, but might have allowed enough lateral movement to cause the pictured damage.


  16. #16
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    Fuquay Varina, NC
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    Default Re: brick movement

    That brick veneer was broke from trying to drive a masonry nail in the mortar joint. Not much meat to bare the blunt force of driving a nail. Broke several of those corner myself over the years.

    Mike Schulz License 393
    Affordable Home Inspections
    www.houseinspections.com

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