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  1. #1
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Swiss cheese glue lam

    Any thoughts on the number of lags through these glue lams. Makes me hungry, loose like swiss cheese.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Oregon
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    2,365

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    It's undoubtedly engineered.... there should be some plans available or at least there were at one time. Aside from mentioning the buyer chase down the plans there's nothing I'd say.... unless there was a visible problem with it.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Southern Vancouver Island
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    4,549

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    The holes are weak but the bolts are strong, the bolts are strong but the holes are weak.
    Yep, we need an engineer to figure this out.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    Yep, we need an engineer to figure this out.

    I think an engineer already did.

    I doubt all those bolts were placed there for cosmetic reasons, I am sure they were specified to be there, in that staggered spacing.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Quote Originally Posted by mathew stouffer View Post
    Any thoughts on the number of lags through these glue lams. Makes me hungry, loose like swiss cheese.
    I would not worry about it.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  6. #6
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    It looks like they may have over counter sunk the heads.
    I would point out over drilling of the beams as a foot note.
    any further information required check with plans.

    Best

    Ron
    Santa Rosa California Home Inspection - Exterminating & Thermal Imaging

    Last edited by Ron Bibler; 09-16-2009 at 01:53 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Plano, Texas
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    4,170

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Unless you have a Sherman tank collection parked over the top of that beam I would not give it a second thought.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  8. #8
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Quote Originally Posted by mathew stouffer View Post
    Any thoughts on the number of lags through these glue lams. Makes me hungry, loose like swiss cheese.
    MS: Very ugly - but hell for stout.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    New Mexico
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    1,258

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Why did they do that? Was there something hanging on the other side? It looks open on both sides in the photo.

    Jim Robinson
    New Mexico, USA

  10. #10
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    I think these beams are supporting an upper roof or a half vaulted roof.

    Best

    Ron
    Santa Rosa California Home Inspection - Exterminating & Thermal Imaging


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Rolla, MO
    Posts
    126

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    GluLams are usually made in standard widths and from your picture the engineer used two beams. The bolts allow the two beams to act as one beam. Unless you see any significant splitting or sagging I would not comment on that beam.


  12. #12
    Richard A Hetzel's Avatar
    Richard A Hetzel Guest

    Default Re: Swiss cheese glue lam

    Washers are sometimes countersunk into glu-lams as shown. Typically, they are not, but the consistency of the depths and the accuracy of the drilling suggests it was part of the design. The number of holes is of no consequence, given their function of "laminating" two glu-lams together so they act as one beam. The precision of the spacing also suggests that it was engineered. I see no reason to make any comment at all.


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