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  1. #1
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    Default Treated wood for garage framing

    I don't know of any requirement for a garage to be framed with treated wood other than the sill plate. I have a friend that has a complaint from someone that has a contractor buddy that was doing some remodeling on their garage claiming that the garage should have been framed with treated wood. I have not ever heard of it. At least not around here. Have any of you heard of such a thing?

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    Last edited by Frank Bombardiere; 09-27-2009 at 06:37 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Nevermind, I just found out that he was talking about the sill plate only, which should be treated lumber.

    If it weren't for lawyers, we would never need them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Bombardiere View Post
    I don't know of any requirement for a garage to be framed with treated wood other than the sill plate. I have a friend that has a complaint from someone that has a contractor buddy that was doing some remodeling on their garage claiming that the garage should have been framed with treated wood.
    Frank,

    Depends on how the garage slab was constructed - and how close the studs are to the ground.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Mitchell Toelle's Avatar
    Mitchell Toelle Guest

    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Jerry,

    I thought that any wood in direct contact with concrete needed to be PT. Can you set me straight?


  5. #5
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitchell Toelle View Post
    Jerry,

    I thought that any wood in direct contact with concrete needed to be PT. Can you set me straight?
    SECTION R319
    PROTECTION AGAINST DECAY
    R319.1 Location required. Protection from decay shall be
    provided in the following locations by the use of naturally
    durable wood or wood that is preservative treated in accordance
    with AWPA U1 for the species, product, preservative
    and end use. Preservatives shall be listed in Section 4 of
    AWPA U1.
    1. Wood joists or the bottom of a wood structural floor
    when closer than 18 inches (457 mm) or wood girders
    when closer than 12 inches (305 mm) to the exposed
    ground in crawl spaces or unexcavated area located
    within the periphery of the building foundation.
    2. All wood framing members that rest on concrete or
    masonry exterior foundation walls and are less than 8
    inches (203 mm) from the exposed ground.
    3. Sills and sleepers on a concrete or masonry slab that is in
    direct contact with the ground unless separated from
    such slab by an impervious moisture barrier.
    4. The ends of wood girders entering exteriormasonry or concrete
    walls having clearances of less than 0.5 inch (12.7
    mm) on tops, sides and ends.
    5. Wood siding, sheathing and wall framing on the exterior
    of a building having a clearance of less than 6 inches (152
    mm) from the ground.
    6. Wood structural members supporting moisture-permeable
    floors or roofs that are exposed to the weather, such
    as concrete or masonry slabs, unless separated from such
    floors or roofs by an impervious moisture barrier.
    7. Wood furring strips or other wood framing members
    attached directly to the interior of exterior masonry walls
    or concrete walls below grade except where an approved
    vapor retarder is applied between the wall and the furring
    strips or framing members.
    [1]This section addresses the need for minimum protection
    against decay damage for wood members located
    in certain locations.
    For those portions of a wood-framed structure that
    are subject to damage by decay, the code mandates
    that the lumber be pressure-preservative treated or be
    naturally durable wood, or be of a species of wood
    having a natural resistance to decay. Naturally durable
    wood by definition is the heartwood of decay-resistant
    redwood, cedars, black locust and black walnut.
    Crawl spaces and unexcavated areas under a building
    usually contain moisture-laden air. These spaces
    must be ventilated in accordance with Section R408 to
    remove as much moisture as possible before it causes
    decay. Wood placed a minimum specified distance
    above grade in unexcavated under-floor areas or
    crawl spaces as shown in Commentary Figure
    R319.1(1) need not be either preservative-treated
    wood or wood that is naturally decay resistant durable
    wood. These clearances below floor joists and beams
    are deemed to be the minimum necessary to allow adequate
    circulation and removal of moisture from the air
    and from the wood framing members. Such clearances
    apply within the exterior wall line of the building
    foundation.
    Foundation walls will absorb moisture from the
    ground and by capillary action move it to framing members
    that are in contact with the foundation. Unless a
    minimum clearance of 8 inches (203 mm) is maintained
    from the finished grade to wood sills resting on
    concrete or masonry exterior foundation walls, decay-
    resistant or preservative-treated wood as shown
    in Commentary Figure R319.1(2) must be used. The
    8-inch (203 mm) clearance specified in this section
    has been determined to be large enough to prevent
    wetting of wood framing members under most circumstances.
    Concrete and masonry slabs that are in direct contact
    with the earth are very susceptible to moisture because
    of absorption of ground water. This can occur
    on interior slabs as well as at the perimeter. In the case
    of wood sills or sleepers placed on concrete or masonry
    slabs, decay-resistant wood or pressure-treated
    wood is required where the slabs are in direct contact
    with the ground, as illustrated in Commentary Figure
    R319.1(3). Concrete that is fully separated from the
    ground by a vapor barrier is not in direct contact with
    earth.
    A minimum 1/2-inch (12.7 mm) clearance along the
    top, sides and ends of wood members projecting into
    exterior masonry or concrete walls must be maintained
    as illustrated in Commentary Figure R319.1(4),
    unless the wood is treated or is of a species that is naturally
    decay resistant.
    Experience has shown that wood siding may extend
    below the sill plate to within 6 inches (152 mm) of the
    earth without decaying. Commentary Figure
    R319.1(5) shows the required minimum 6-inch (152
    mm) clearance from the ground for wood siding,
    sheathing and wall framing on the exterior of a building.
    It should not be in direct contact with the foundation
    wall.


  6. #6
    Mitchell Toelle's Avatar
    Mitchell Toelle Guest

    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Thank you Aaron. I've saved that info.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Treated wood for garage framing

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    SECTION R319
    PROTECTION AGAINST DECAY
    2. All wood framing members that rest on concrete or
    masonry exterior foundation walls and are less than 8
    inches (203 mm) from the exposed ground.
    That's the part I was referring to.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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