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  1. #1
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    Default pier against floor sheathing

    I-joist under floor framing. Wall above this pier is parallel to I-jiosts. Wood on top of pier rests against floor sheathing. With stick-built, I could think of a better way to do this but not completely sure with I-joists. So it this considered ok with I-joist framing?

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall Clark;105475
    I-joist under floor framing. Wall above this pier is parallel to I-jiosts.

    Wood on top of pier rests against floor sheathing. With stick-built, I could think of a better way to do this but not completely sure with I-joists.

    So it this considered ok with I-joist framing?
    .
    NO! ( Not a Chance.)
    .



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  3. #3
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    what is above that point load is there another point load to the second floor

    Last edited by Richard Pultar; 10-16-2009 at 10:47 PM. Reason: point load

  4. #4
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Pultar View Post
    what is above that point load
    There is a wall that runs between two rooms and it has two wide walk through openings.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall Clark View Post
    I-joist under floor framing. Wall above this pier is parallel to I-jiosts. Wood on top of pier rests against floor sheathing. With stick-built, I could think of a better way to do this but not completely sure with I-joists. So it this considered ok with I-joist framing?
    Surely you jest.

    No, it is not okay (nor is that electrical wire run across the bottom of the joist).

    What should have been done, if there is a concentrated load at that location, is the installation of squash blocks in the existing joists, perpendicular joists installed between them and below the load, and a proper pier support up to that point, with a plate catching the existing joists and the perpendiculars.

    Of course I wouldn't write that up in a report - instead just call it out as a defect to be repaired properly by a competent contractor.


  6. #6
    Richard Pultar's Avatar
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    if that is a post continuation then it is correct installation .except that the pier is one course short. Now it is a short post.
    A squash block installation is not interchangeable with post continuation support.
    what's wrong with the wire?


  7. #7
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Pultar View Post
    if that is a post continuation then it is correct installation .except that the pier is one course short. Now it is a short post.
    A squash block installation is not interchangeable with post continuation support.
    what's wrong with the wire?
    Look at that second photo - does it really look like post continuation to you? Randall said there was a wall above the location, making me think they simply located a wall parallel to and between the floor joists (maybe they misplaced the joists?) and are correcting for floor sag. I can't imagine the plans called for a post to be located there and constructed in such a manner.

    The wire installation looks like a homeowner special - that or the HVAC installer did it. Most I-Joists have knockouts specifically for running service through them - to simply loop the wire under the joist is both an unprofessional install AND an incorrect one. I say incorrect because it looks like it is run in the area required for servicing the HVAC equipment, in which case it should be protected from damage if run exposed.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Corn Walker View Post
    Randall said there was a wall above the location, making me think they simply located a wall parallel to and between the floor joists (maybe they misplaced the joists?) and are correcting for floor sag. I can't imagine the plans called for a post to be located there and constructed in such a manner.
    I think that is exactly what is going on and to put squash blocks on either of the two joist will not work if the load is coming down between them (crude measurements indicated that).

    I did run into a similar situation with truss floor framing where the builder added a pier after initial construction. Subfloor rested on it like this one at the bottom of a stair case. The SE said it was ok. A screw up somewhere but according to him, the remedy was fine.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: pier against floor sheathing

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall Clark View Post
    I think that is exactly what is going on and to put squash blocks on either of the two joist will not work if the load is coming down between them (crude measurements indicated that).
    No, I meant squash blocks on the joists so you could install perpendicular blocking. You would then install squash blocks and full height blocking along the length of the wall which would serve to stiffen the floor as well as eliminate the deflection in the subfloor the wall is causing. If additional support was required for a point load or along the entire wall that could be addressed with one or more piers and, potentially, a beam.


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