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  1. #1

    Default Floor Truss Support

    Inspected a home today and the floor trusses are installed resting on pieces of wood, some nailed, some not. There is an area that has a 2X4 attached at the exterior wall on one end and the other end fastened to the floor truss, I guess to keep it from wracking/moving. The main beam was cut apart in several sections and supported with lolley posts wedged top and bottom with pieces of wood. I wrote all it up to consult contractor/engineer etc, etc. Question I am unable to find this type of installation method of trusses anywhere on the net, so am I correct in writing this up like this?
    Thanks.

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    Michael Carson
    Inspect It Right Home Inspections L.L.C.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    I can't tell much about the situation due to the lack of perspective. Was it possible to get a long range establishing shot?
    From what I can see though, it looks screwed up, I would agree with calling to get it fixed by an expert.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Michael I agree with Jim. First pic looks like an M.C. Escher drawing. Ledger board appears and disappears into nowhere. Second pic has top cord of truss cut and looks like all of the rest of the trusses must be cut the same way. Third pic has truss supported from the top of the cord, but it might be designed for that. Beam support is considered a temp support and shimming is questionable at best.

    Stay away from suggesting how to fix and just refer to SE.


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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Michael,

    In the first photo, you also got the upside-down installed insulation (presuming that is a floor above and you are in the basement).

    First photo (continued) looks like that is a top bearing truss, but stacking that many "shims" on top of each other is not good practice and indicates there was a design flaw somewhere - normally there would be 1, possibly 2, 2x attached to the vertical end of the truss so that the top bearing truss was bearing on those 2x which would be secured to the truss with truss plates. Add to this the fact that the truss is too short and they stuck a 2x between the truss vertical and the bearing plate under those shims and there may well be insufficient bearing under that truss.

    In the second photo, they whacked out (no other appropriate term for it) some of the truss top plat and thoroughly screwed that truss up. That truss is end bearing (or so I am presuming based on the other trusses) and they cut the top chord out of it - not good at all as you now have a totally screwed up truss. A structural engineer needs to address this, and the one in the first photo too while there.

    Third photo seems to be showing more of the same condition as shown in the first photo.

    No doubt about it - write it up and call for a structural engineer to design appropriate repairs, to inspect those repairs, and to issue a letter that the repairs have been made in accordance with the engineering.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    That beam is short too. Should be extending to the foundation wall. That's why the temp post. Forgot the stretcher again.


  6. #6

    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Here is another picture, not the best as I did not have alot of room in the basement to get a good perspective shot. There were alot more things wrong with the structure, not just this one. They notched the trusses in the garage so that the overhead doors would open, then tried to repair them. Added onto the garage and the overhangs are falling on the ends and on inside, not supported properly.
    Thanks for the help.

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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Carson View Post
    Here is another picture, not the best as I did not have alot of room in the basement to get a good perspective shot. There were alot more things wrong with the structure, not just this one. They notched the trusses in the garage so that the overhead doors would open, then tried to repair them. Added onto the garage and the overhangs are falling on the ends and on inside, not supported properly.
    Thanks for the help.
    Must be no one has every told the builder about low headroom track for garage doors. This is just one of those jobs where you shake your head and say "wow".

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    That house looks more and more like a "pusher" with every new photo!

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  9. #9
    Andrew Christel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Looks like serious structural deficiencies. What is supporting the rest of the house? Yes I would definitely recommend that to a qualified engineer.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Ok Jim, I'll bite. What's a "pusher"?
    DetroitMatt


  11. #11
    Andrew Christel's Avatar
    Andrew Christel Guest

    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Please, Jim.. What is a "pusher". ?? Have not heard that term.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Think ... bull dozer ... maybe a Caterpillar D7?

    I was thinking it might even be a "leaner" ... where all you need to do is "lean" against the house and it will fall down.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Jerry got it. A pusher is a house that needs to be pushed down and start fresh. Pusher, dozer bait, POS (Piece of S***), are all terms of "affection" for houses in various stages of disrepair.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  14. #14
    Andrew Christel's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: Floor Truss Support

    Thanks for the information. I now have a better understanding


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    I've inspected many "leaners".

    My explanation to my clients was to "not lean to heavily against the house - it might fall down" - they got it too.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  16. #16

    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    And to add to all of that, the home has a wood foundation, nice. All lower level walls were finished so I wrote to remove wall finishes and inspect structure as well. If the visible structure is this bad, what is behind the walls.

    Michael Carson
    Inspect It Right Home Inspections L.L.C.
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  17. #17
    Andrew Christel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Michael. In the photos it looks like the drywall is unfinished? Is that an addition? and if it is was ther a building permit?


  18. #18

    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    That was one of the many things that was discussed. The persons buying the home are a brother and sister. They were onsite during the inspection along with their father who is the local fire chief. They were going to E mail me when they find out what is said by an engineer.

    Michael Carson
    Inspect It Right Home Inspections L.L.C.
    www.inspectitrighthomeinspection.com

  19. #19
    Andrew Christel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Interested to know how that turns out!!! Thank you


  20. #20
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Anytime I see more than three joists field laminated together as a beam its time to be suspicious, since standard practice limits it to three, otherwise its an indication a larger depth-height was/is required.

    Generally, teleposts/screw jacks are a temporary not permanent structural support.

    Expect a thumbs down on the structural engineer's report/Level 2 and substantial remediation required.

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  21. #21
    Ralph Millard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Floor Truss Support

    Do you remember how this turned out?


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