Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Footing question

    Is this acceptable. These footings are running right along the edge of rock. Does this exempt the requirement for not disturbing the zone of compression, if rock is beneath the footing.

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Footing question

    Here is another pic, it's tough to see in the photo.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images

  3. #3
    Ron Bibler's Avatar
    Ron Bibler Guest

    Default Re: Footing question

    I would call the out mat.

    1. The form board are still in place. ( Termite problem )

    2. Call for the buyer to check on building permits.

    Its only supported on one side. first photo.

    did you stick a screw driver in the dirt ? some times you can feel if there is a footing or not.

    Best

    Ron


  4. #4
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Footing question

    Ron,
    The first photo, the footing is poured on solid rock. The second pic the footing is about a depth of 12 inches into the rock.


  5. #5

    Default Re: Footing question

    The form boards are definitely an issue.

    With all of the post and beam structures in my area, I've got hundreds of pictures that look worse. Whether or not it's an issue would depend on what I saw while I was there.

    If what looks like dirt beneath the pier pad is actually a large boulder acting as part of the pad, I'd ignore it. If there is dirt under the pad anywhere within a 45 deg. angle from the base of the footing/ boulder, I'd call it (most likely).

    EDIT: Apparently it doesn't freeze in your area (riiight). Nice exposed copper pipes.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Footing question

    Rock can take a vertical load (depending on the type of rock, but most can).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  7. #7
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Footing question

    It was -6 this morning


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •