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  1. #1

    Default Correcting bowed studs

    The builder claims they "notched" the studs on the bearing walls to correct any bowing allowing for a better drywall installation. They used shims as needed and then 1x4 to cover the "notch". The client did not agree with this and wants all the "notched" studs replaced. I am in need of a specific code referrence that either allows or dis-allows this practice. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    Sorry can't help with a Code section. My guess is Jerry will have a reference. Other than that I have to say I'm suspicious of the builders comment. If they were bowed that bad, they should have been replaced. An 1/8" to 1/4" bow would be barely noticeable in the drywall over the span of a wall. Very odd excuse. A better solution would have been to draw a straightline along the stud and then plane out the bow. The client would have never noticed the difference.
    If the Builder isn't willing to install a few studs to make the client happy, then there are probably other concerns to think about. If we are talking about more than a few studs, then there are serious questions to ask about the overall construction. Why are the studs bowed, poor storage, poor quality, excess weather exposure, upper level structural loads?
    Not that I know much about romex since it isn't allowed here but shouldn't there be connectors holding the romex to the box?

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  3. #3
    robertarmacost's Avatar
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    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    R602.6

    1. Notching. any stud in an exterior wall or bearing partition may be cut or notched to a depth not exceeding 25% of it's width.

    hope this helps, from 2006 IRC


  4. #4
    chris mcintyre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    Occasionally a stud gets crowned the wrong way or just installed when it should not have been. Making a relief cut in the bowed stud and then sistering another one beside it is a common practice, and IMO acceptable. The key is that the "sistered" (if that is word) stud is a full length stud secured at the top and bottom plates. The main reason for not simply replacing the stud is that there could be a sheathing seam, siding or wall ties secured to the stud from the exterior.

    Allen, I would say that the stud that is scabbed with a block is wrong, if the stud to the right is full length then it is OK.

    ...and then 1x4 to cover the "notch".
    Those are 2x4's pictured.

    Not that I know much about romex since it isn't allowed here but shouldn't there be connectors holding the romex to the box?
    There is a "pressure clip", that is a term that I made up but it is the best way I can think of to describe it, that holds the wire in place and keeps it from pulling out of the box after it is installed.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    From the 2006 IRC. (underlining and bold are mine)
    - R602.6 Drilling and notching–studs. Drilling and notching of studs shall be in accordance with the following:
    - - 1. Notching. Any stud in an exterior wall or bearing partition may be cut or notched to a depth not exceeding 25 percent of its width. Studs in nonbearing partitions may be notched to a depth not to exceed 40 percent of a single stud width.

    That does not say "every stud".

    Not that it matters as those notches are likely much deeper than 25%.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6

    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    All- Thanks for the input and the referrence. Now I can finish my report and get to more important matters. (sons 12th B-day today)


  7. #7

    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    When a good framing contractor finishes a wall that is a kitchen wall to receive cabinets or any wall to receive wainscotting or library paneling, he may make an effort to string line the wall and straighten studs to make a better installation of cabinets, wainscotting etc.

    The scarf cuts or notches should be sistered properly to provide both lateral and vertical support.

    A bad or marginal framer would let the cabinet installer or wainscot installer worry about the wavy appearance of the wall.


  8. #8
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    If the builder is too cheap to use finger-joint studs or his framing crew is too lazy to crown the standard studs before framing the wall, this is the last resort of the inept.

    For extreme bows, a kerf cut not exceeding the allowable 25% of the stud depth is likely to produce little result, so most I have seen exceed that standard. Additionally in my opinion as per my experience, sistering should consist of members of the same size as the kerfed studs and extend at least 12" to both sides of the kerf. So then, either on 2X sister or best practice 2 1X sisters.

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    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    Quote Originally Posted by A.D. Miller View Post
    For extreme bows, a kerf cut not exceeding the allowable 25% of the stud depth is likely to produce little result, so most I have seen exceed that standard. Additionally in my opinion as per my experience, sistering should consist of members of the same size as the kerfed studs and extend at least 12" to both sides of the kerf. So then, either on 2X sister or best practice 2 1X sisters.
    However, that STILL would not meet the code limitations ... not unless an engineer gave a signed and sealed drawing showing it was acceptable, and then the builder used that letter whenever it was needed. The engineer may also place limits on the number of notched studs in a row, or within a specified distance.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  10. #10
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Correcting bowed studs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    However, that STILL would not meet the code limitations ... not unless an engineer gave a signed and sealed drawing showing it was acceptable, and then the builder used that letter whenever it was needed. The engineer may also place limits on the number of notched studs in a row, or within a specified distance.
    JP: I did not say that studs which are over-notched (kerfed) can be repaired without an engineers letter, did I?

    Compliant notches do not require repair. The repair methods I suggested are optional for code compliance, and only mandatory if you want the repaired stud to remain in place long enought o drywall it.


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