Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    S.W. Missouri
    Posts
    71

    Default Another Truss question

    In an inspection today everything looked good accept these truss joints. It looks to me that modification were made in the field and nail plates should have been installed on these joints. Any thoughts?

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    2018 ASHI InspectionWorld

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,340

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    That looks like an attic truss combined with stick framing. The attic truss designs I've seen are all assembled as a unit in the factory.

    Do you have any photos showing a wider view?

    Dom.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    S.W. Missouri
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    No I don't. I will try to describe the situation.
    There is a square box truss and then there is what looks like a traditional truss sitting on top of that to form the ridge and it looks like then they extended rafters from the corner you see, down to the eve. I hope that makes sense.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,248

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    To expand on what Bob R. said: a piggy-back trusses setting on top of another truss (this is done to meet width limitations when trucking the trusses on the trucks), then someone added the rafters down to below.

    Typically, I would see straps/plates/gussets holding the piggy-back trusses to the trusses below, and holding the rafter to the truss it is bearing on at that corner.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    This could be what the "designer" intended. Short of having a truss schedule and/or a roof framing plan, you cannot second guess the genius who thought it up. You can, however, defer to his infinite wisdom in your report by stating something to the effect: This hybrid truss/stick frame roof system appears to be inadequately joined where the systems meet. You are strongly urged to have a representative of the design engineer's firm inspect and verify the correctness of this installation in writing, replete with the design engineer's stamp and signature.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    S.W. Missouri
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    I guess it would be a good time to tell, that the buyer had an engineer give a report on this house the week before my inspection. His report, from what the buyer said, had nothing significant to report.
    I am leaning toward calling this, just to be safe.


  7. #7
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Another Truss question

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob R View Post
    I guess it would be a good time to tell, that the buyer had an engineer give a report on this house the week before my inspection. His report, from what the buyer said, had nothing significant to report.
    I am leaning toward calling this, just to be safe.
    BR: It was likely a structural engineer. Those with this designation who work in the residential arena are often not very good engineers. Even if they are competent at addressing foundation issues they likely will not no anything at all about truss design. The P.E. designation sometimes indicates Partially Educated.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •