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  1. #1
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Stiffener plates on trusses

    This home was built in 1995. I typically do not see this, is it acceptable or is this considered an unapproved field alteration. It sure did look purtty

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  2. #2
    Kary Krismer's Avatar
    Kary Krismer Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    What are the boards that cross through the gaps? It almost looks like they were trying to suspend something from the trusses.


  3. #3
    Steve E Zabarylo's Avatar
    Steve E Zabarylo Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Quote Originally Posted by Kary Krismer View Post
    What are the boards that cross through the gaps? It almost looks like they were trying to suspend something from the trusses.
    j)
    Roof truss bracingóweb members longer than 6 ft.
    (1.82 m) require bracing. This bracing consists of a 1 in. x 3
    in. (19 mm x 76 mm) nailed with two, 2 in. (50 mm) nails
    across all of the compression members for the full length

    of the roof.

    The trusses may have had a rough ride to the site and the manufacturer authorized the plywood gusset reinforcement to keep the code wranglers happy. There has to be a letter on record with an engineers signature for the modification.

    Them are some wicked collar ties!



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Strong backs and field applied gussets/plates (not stiffeners). Cannot apply factory type metal truss plates in the field. Plywood is often used for this purpose.Multi-piece truss system. Non-storage type high pitched and tall attic space, made in two parts so can be shipped to site. See drawings (and notes thereon) for specifics.


  5. #5
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Thanks guys. Kary the boards for to TV equipment and other crap they had up there. I didn't hang around that long to check it out, it was 138 degrees.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Quote Originally Posted by mathew stouffer View Post
    Thanks guys. Kary the boards for to TV equipment and other crap they had up there. I didn't hang around that long to check it out, it was 138 degrees.

    No, they are NOT FOR that.

    The rows of 4x2" stress-graded lumber are permanent bracing, specifically Continuous Lateral Restraint (CLR) for the supporting trusses along their TOP CHORD, and would be indicated on the Truss Design Drawing(s) (TDD(s) (possibly via note referring to summary sheet)!

    There may also be tags applied to the Engineered Trusses themselves indicating locations.

    All top chords require permanent restraint/bracing for all the top chords in a piggyback assembly.

    The restraint might be accomplished by:
    Rows of 4x2 stress-graded lumber CLR and Diagonal Bracing (as we see here for the supporting trusses), or

    Connecting the CLR into the roof diaphragm, or

    adding Structural Sheathing or Bracing Frames, or

    some other equivalent means.
    Diagonal Bracing at 10' intervals or less, as specified on the Truss Design Drawing(s) (TDDs).
    CLR at spacing specified on the Truss Design Drawing(s) (TDDs).

    Pictured in MS's photos:

    The upper, or CAP TRUSS is PIGGYBACKED to the lower SUPPORTING TRUSS.

    Plywood Gusset/Plates connect the two trusses. CLR on the top chords of the supporting trusses.

    Dead and Live Loading should not exceed what is indicated on the truss tags themselves in the areas they are tagged, and in lieu of truss tags what AND WHERE is indicated on the TDDs, in lieu of neither, there should be NO ADDITIONAL LOADING TO THE TRUSSES (including DIY'd inside antenae).


  7. #7
    Kary Krismer's Avatar
    Kary Krismer Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Quote Originally Posted by H.G. Watson, Sr. View Post
    Dead and Live Loading should not exceed what is indicated on the truss tags themselves in the areas they are tagged, and in lieu of truss tags what AND WHERE is indicated on the TDDs, in lieu of neither, there should be NO ADDITIONAL LOADING TO THE TRUSSES (including DIY'd inside antenae).
    I once killed a deal of an agent I was mentoring by pointing out that the bonus room added by the owner above the garage was apparently affecting one of the trusses. It was bending laterally at the bottom (top of what would be the garage ceiling), toward it's neighbor and away from the other. The inspector (found by the buyer) hadn't noticed that, but when it was pointed out did mention design for live loads, and it scared off the buyer (probably rightfully so given their intended use of having a lot of people in that area).

    Anyway, assuming you're worried about the weight of an antenna, I would guess you would concur!

    BTW, it also obviously didn't have sheetrock under that added living area.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    If I read what you were asking ... you are referring to the gussets which were applied to the piggy-backed trusses.

    When trusses are too tall ('too wide' when laid on the truck for transporting to the job site) the trusses are made in two sections for transporting, the upper truss is then installed piggy-backed on top of the main truss, with the method of attachment being up to the truss engineer, but most of what I have seen used the plywood gussets like shown in your photo.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    The supporting trusses are first installed, and permanently restrained on their top chords, and diagnonaly braced webs when/where required on the supporting trusses (and temp restrained below) BEFORE the cap trusses can begin to be installed, gussets come after when installing piggyback trusses.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    We have retro fitted plywood gussets like this due to some transferred truss movement,but not that many,they look a foot apart. If code enforcement climbed up there and did their framing inspection and failed it, so then it was retro fitted...hats off to that guy.

    The architect may have encountered this issue in the past and not relying adequate framing techniques, had them added. They are pretty for sure, nice job.

    Joseph Ehrhardt
    Building Forensic Specialist LLC

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Quote Originally Posted by James Risley View Post
    Due to the number of gussets

    Those are there to tie the piggy back truss to the main truss below - see H.G.'s post as he went into further detail than I did in my post.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    JR, The truss designer and building designer have accomodated a heavier concentrated load at the center. Note cap truss and support truss webs line up, gussets on either side there are for continuous vertical web.

    There is nothing to indicate any "red tag" issues. SoP for this type application. Realize you are out of your element. This high pitched tall roof is up in SKI (and SKY) country. Snow loads beyond your TX experiences I'd bet.

    See Building plans and TDDs.

    Last edited by H.G. Watson, Sr.; 07-09-2010 at 11:20 PM.

  13. #13
    Joao Vieira's Avatar
    Joao Vieira Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    I would buy this house without thinking twice about this. But then again, I already have one.


  14. #14
    mathew stouffer's Avatar
    mathew stouffer Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Thanks for all the info.


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    If I read what you were asking ... you are referring to the gussets which were applied to the piggy-backed trusses.

    When trusses are too tall ('too wide' when laid on the truck for transporting to the job site) the trusses are made in two sections for transporting, the upper truss is then installed piggy-backed on top of the main truss, with the method of attachment being up to the truss engineer, but most of what I have seen used the plywood gussets like shown in your photo.
    Agreed Jerry, the top trusses are piggy backed because of the height for hauling. The gusset plates may have just been added by the contractor and not even required. If your concerned note it and suggest SE to look at.

    Randy Gordon, construction
    Michigan Building Inspector/Plan Reviewer

  16. #16
    Mike Truss Guy's Avatar
    Mike Truss Guy Guest

    Cool Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    That is one of the best constructed and correctly installed cap truss connections that I have seen. This connection detail is typically included as any truss engineering package which include a "piggyback" or "cap" truss.

    Those plywood gussets are excellent. The fact that they did not forget the continuous lateral bracing is also heart warming. Well done.

    Now that TV antenna scares me.


  17. #17
    Joao Vieira's Avatar
    Joao Vieira Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    Now that TV antenna scares me


    Is it code compliant under the roof like that? The owner might be alien.
    I have been waiting to have a alien assistant with infrared + x-ray vision to do my inspections.


  18. #18
    Joao Vieira's Avatar
    Joao Vieira Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    http://imghost.indiamart.com/data/U/...ce_250x250.jpg ol school press should work flipped on opposite sides of the plates since the top has tendency to apply less compression


  19. #19
    Mike Truss Guy's Avatar
    Mike Truss Guy Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    That is old school. The forces needed to press truss plates is very high. Eagle Metal Products makes a pretty good portable press.



    Eagle Metal Products | Engineering, Fabrication and Equipment for the Building Component Industry


  20. #20
    Joao Vieira's Avatar
    Joao Vieira Guest

    Default Re: Stiffener plates on trusses

    That is indeed a good looking press for highly productive work . The press below is just for smaller scale work and for amateurs like me




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