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Thread: Truss joists

  1. #1
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    Default Truss joists

    What do you think of this system. Pros and cons.

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  2. #2
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Truss joists

    DIY'er


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    I have never seen a hanging truss like this and am wondering what you all think. It sure appears to be handling the loads but just looks like a big. WHY? to me. Like why wouldn't it be supported from below.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    cmon guys. Any thoughts?


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    Truss systems are "egineered" for the task (or at least they are supposed to be). Assuming these were designed for the purpose and installed as specified, there is little to say about them unless they are visibly in the process of failing.

    If you found no signs of distress or deflection then I would think you would have no comment to make about them as a home inspector. The fact that you (or I) might be unfamiliar with this particualr truss configuration is not in of itself a "defect".


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    Floor trusses are fine if designed and installed properly. Those look like top chord bearing trusses.

    Floor Truss


  7. #7
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    Lake Barrington, IL
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    I agree, top bearing truss. Not a question on this one. The second picture deserves comment.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  8. #8
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    Austin, TX
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    I see quite few top bearing trusses similar to the ones in your photo on new construction. As mentioned, as long as they are installed to specs it should not be an issue. The truss resting on the posts doesn't appear to be secured to the post?

    Eric


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    Yeah, got the post thing. Just flapping in the wind. Thanks for the help on the truss. Hadn't seen it like that before.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Truss joists

    Those are probably missing from another job site I'd bet.


  11. #11
    Mike Truss Guy's Avatar
    Mike Truss Guy Guest

    Cool Re: Truss joists

    Top chord bearing floor trusses usually do not allow for more than about 1/4" to 1/2" gap between the metal gusset plate and the wall. These look like maybe 4". This is not allowed becasue of horizontal shear in the top chord lumber. To me they look like trusses that were designed for a wide CMU wall, but we installed on a 2x4 wood framed wall. Other than that they look to be in good shape.

    Also FYI, these are metal plate connected floor trusses. TrusJoist is a trademarked name of a line of products made by a company which I believe is part of Weyerhauser now. They make both commercial and residential products. Most of their commercial products feature manufactured wood chords and a pinned metal web. Their residential products are most commonly the TJI - wood I Joists.

    Last edited by Mike Truss Guy; 02-09-2009 at 11:45 PM.

  12. #12
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
    A.D. Miller Guest

    Default Re: Truss joists

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Truss Guy View Post
    Top chord bearing floor trusses usually do not allow for more than about 1/4" to 1/2" gap between the metal gusset plate and the wall. These look like maybe 4". This is not allowed becasue of horizontal shear in the top chord lumber. To me they look like trusses that were designed for a wide CMU wall, but we installed on a 2x4 wood framed wall. Other than that they look to be in good shape.

    Also FYI, these are metal plate connected floor trusses. TrusJoist is a trademarked name of a line of products made by a company which I believe is part of Weyerhauser now. They make both commercial and residential products. Most of their commercial products feature manufactured wood chords and a pinned metal web. Their residential products are most commonly the TJI - wood I Joists.
    MTG: Specific terms - music to my ears.


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