Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    25

    Default Steel I-Beam Supports

    Had this come up in an inspection today on a 6 year old house. One of the Steel I-beam was supported by two 2x6’s on one end and a steel post in a framed wall on the other, neither was anchored. Wrote it up for evaluation by a structural engineer. Just looking for some input for a newer inspector. Thanks

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    F.I.R.E. Services

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Charlotte NC Licensed in NC and SC
    Posts
    597

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    They need to be anchored at the top and bottom. The 2x6's are temporary and need a more permanent post. It should be out of the way so no one is tempted to remove it. No big deal for a contractor, I would not refer that simple fix to an engineer but you can if you like.

    Bruce King, B.A. King Home Inspections, LLC
    www.BAKingHomeInspections.com
    Certified Master Inspector, Independent Inspectorwww.IndependentInspectors.org

  3. #3
    Daniel Mummey's Avatar
    Daniel Mummey Guest

    Post Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    The right word for this is "temporary" and you did right by pointing it out. Retrofits involving indeterminate structural members and systems questionably outside standard practices & applicable codes need referral to a licensed engineer, if no stamped plans cover the modification. Yes, there's contractors/builders we could all recommend to correct the problem but none of them should without a PE signature of the plans. It cost far less for PE plans review than the risk of possible injury suite to a contractor/builder.


  4. #4
    Jeffrey Block's Avatar
    Jeffrey Block Guest

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    I'm a structural/building inspection engineer, notice the eccentricity on the fourth photograph. This type of connection would dramatically reduce the capacity for the beam. FYI for future reference.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Succasunna NJ
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    It looks to me like here are no footing present for either support.

    Darren www.aboutthehouseinspections.com
    'Whizzing & pasting & pooting through the day (Ronnie helping Kenny helping burn his poots away!) (FZ)

  6. #6

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    On the point of footings; I would wonder what the floor is that the beam is supported by, and the structure under the floor. Where does the load go?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  8. #8
    gene schafer's Avatar
    gene schafer Guest

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    As a general I wouldn't touch this problem without a structural engineer. Your doing the right thing in your report by recommending a structural engineer.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Good call and you did the right thing. There are inspectors in my area that would look at and say, "Well, it doesn't look like it's causing any problems. It's okay". Of course, they are some of the Realtor darlings and don't want to cause undo concern to the buyer.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  10. #10
    Ted Williams's Avatar
    Ted Williams Guest

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Thanks Michael. Good article.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Omaha
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Quote Originally Posted by John A Duncan View Post
    Had this come up in an inspection today on a 6 year old house. One of the Steel I-beam was supported by two 2x6’s on one end and a steel post in a framed wall on the other, neither was anchored. Wrote it up for evaluation by a structural engineer. Just looking for some input for a newer inspector. Thanks
    I look at the ends and wonder if this is a structural beam. The last picture shows and end in the middle of the space. I beams normally sit on top of the foundation with supports at a necessary mid point(s) between. Also I have only seen it where both trunk lines are on the same side of the beam. Never a beam in between.

    I would guess that the floor above is a little bouncy and someone is trying to remove the bounce. I do think if they are going to put in a beam then it needs better supports and needs to be secure.

    The pictures give such a limited detail of whats going on. Excluding the beam in the picture where are the supports for the floor joists. Is there another beam that is the actual designed beam for the joists. Again excluding the beam in the picture how long of span are the joists covering.

    to the beam in question. You can see both ends. There is a finished room between them. How wide is that room, thus how long is that beam. As it is I dont see the wood providing much support. That is another reason I dont think it is a designed structural element.


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Yeah thanks for that article Michael. Did anyone note the recommended practice for making a height adjusting screw permanent?!?

    "According to all ICC-ES Reports, the columns must be installed vertically and plumb. Also, the height-adjusting screw must be disabled after installation. This is achieved by destroying the screw threads with a chisel or a weld, or by setting the column screw side down and completely encasing the screw in concrete. (In this case, of course, you won’t even see the screw.) Disabling is required, I am told by my code enforcement sources, to discourage tampering after installation."

    I'd guess that any amount of "destroying" one could do with a chisel to the threads that would be effective at limiting the screw from movement could damage the column in the process. Seems brutish for a recommended practice. Picturing a 21yr old contractor down there following instructions with a 28oz Estwing in full destroy mode. Just thinking out loud.....

    Last edited by Luc V. L.; 03-04-2011 at 10:17 AM. Reason: grammar

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Omaha
    Posts
    143

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Quote Originally Posted by Luc V. L. View Post
    Yeah thanks for that article Michael. Did anyone note the recommended practice for making a height adjusting screw permanent?!?

    "According to all ICC-ES Reports, the columns must be installed vertically and plumb. Also, the height-adjusting screw must be disabled after installation. This is achieved by destroying the screw threads with a chisel or a weld, or by setting the column screw side down and completely encasing the screw in concrete. (In this case, of course, you won’t even see the screw.) Disabling is required, I am told by my code enforcement sources, to discourage tampering after installation."

    I'd guess that any amount of "destroying" one could do with a chisel to the threads that would be effective at limiting the screw from movement could damage the column in the process. Seems brutish for a recommended practice. Picturing a 21yr old contractor down there following instructions with a 28oz Estwing in full destroy mode. Just thinking out loud.....

    Lucas

    The permanent column has a 1 piece tube like the one shown by the OP. It takes turning the top metal plate or the steel tube to adjust. If the top AND bottom are attached to immovable surfaces. I see some with tabs that would prevent it from turning. Mostly I see the screw end down. Never realized that the screw was buried. Dont see any need to damage the threads.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Brooks View Post
    Good call and you did the right thing. There are inspectors in my area that would look at and say, "Well, it doesn't look like it's causing any problems. It's okay". Of course, they are some of the Realtor darlings and don't want to cause undo concern to the buyer.
    It's scary if someone would pass this by without comment for correction.

    The correction will not be an easy job since you have to crate 2 footers and permanently attach 2 fixed column to the beam and footers. Plus the elect wire has to be moved. Been there, have done that. Real problem is what we are not seeing.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ottawa Ontario Canada
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Picture 4 shows the end of an engineered joist that is not visible in picture 2. How many other joists have been cut and where's the other end of the one pictured in 4? I'm assuming there's a finished ceiling under that section of I-beam.


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    Steve, Yes there is a finished ceiling below the I-bean and Joist. That was the only on I saw.


  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    I would like to thank everyone for their insight, very helpful. Michael…thanks for the great article. To give a little more info on the structure. The I-beam in question was in the center of the house and about 20’ long. On one side, 10’ away, was another I-bean with one side in the foundation and the other ending at a permanent steel post. On the other side of the I-bean in question was finished basement, unable to see if there were any other I-beams present. One question I do have “is It ok to have that Adjustable steel column inside the framing of the wall? As you can see in picture #3. I would say no, just looking for input. Thanks[FONT='Verdana','sans-serif'][/FONT]



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Steel I-Beam Supports

    John,
    Can't see the forest for the trees sometimes.
    1) Column built into a wall (actually wall would be built around column, since it would be attached to beam and directly to footer), why not. But, the column has to be right in the first place. It appears that the column is resting on wood and top is supporting wood plate. Ok if just a temp situation else wrong. Column should be fixed as in permanent (welded/bolted at top, sitting on footer and bolted at bottom). The column that you show, I would represent as temp. and needs to be corrected. Unless WI code permits.

    I question the wood I joist as to why it is there next to I-beam. Leads me to want to look into the entire load design . As a contractor seen jobs that start as setting permanent column but rest was wrong. Owner had a big mess that did not know about. Owner thought previous contractor had done things right. Looked good to owner.

    With the modifications made to the home, I would question if the loads are being carries correctly. I may have missed if the house was 2story, which adds more concern.

    Good that you called for SI to back you up.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •