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  1. #1
    Jeff Beck's Avatar
    Jeff Beck Guest

    Default Column top plate

    New construction inspection today in a township that I'm not familiar with the AHJ.
    Top plate has only two bolts and no welds (that I could see). Would you report this as an inproper support?
    Thanks,

    Jeff Beck

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Healdsburg, CA
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    Default Re: Column top plate

    Without checking the approved plans and/or spec sheet there's no way to tell.
    Basically I see nothing wrong with a pair of bolts, but like I said, only the PE who drew that detail would know. Describe, disclaim and defer when in doubt.
    Your a generalist.

    Jerry McCarthy
    Building Code/ Construction Consultant

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lake Barrington, IL
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    Default Re: Column top plate

    Much of the time I find the bolts loose but never have a I seen a problem as a result. I tend to ignore it.

    Eric Barker, ACI
    Lake Barrington, IL

  4. #4
    Richard Rushing's Avatar
    Richard Rushing Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    Jeff, that 'I'-beam will hold up a hurd of Bull-Elephants (figuratively).

    With that said, take the words of Jerry Mc. as being right-on target. There is absolutely no-way of telling what the engineered design of this support required in the way of anchoring. If you found something in the way the anchoring was done that causes you concern, by all means.... identify those concerns and document what you found and why you believe they are of concern.


  5. #5
    TIM LEMPE's Avatar
    TIM LEMPE Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    I've been in structural steel for 30 years, thats a pretty typical connection


  6. #6
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    Question for the more experienced:

    Would there be an issue with lateral movement in that column? The end of the I-beam doesn't terminate in a pocket in the foundation and the beam doesn't appear to be attached to the floor joists at all. I don't like it when the only thing stabilizing the assembly and preventing movement is the weight that it is supporting. I know that there is a-lot of weight on top of this and it would be hard to do (unless this is in a garage), but I can visualize a side impact to the post bringing down the house.


  7. #7
    TIM LEMPE's Avatar
    TIM LEMPE Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    I'm curious about the footing, or is the column just sitting on the slab


  8. #8
    TIM LEMPE's Avatar
    TIM LEMPE Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    After looking at the picture a little closer it appears the column cap plate is not the same width as the beam flange which is a requirment


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    2,797

    Default Re: Column top plate

    Speaking of columns, these two had me doing a double take this morning, side clearances were about the same in both parking stalls...

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  10. #10
    Nick Servin's Avatar
    Nick Servin Guest

    Default Re: Column top plate

    As an engineer myself, I would defer to a structural engineer. There is not enough information here to make a determination. For one, the beam is off center, no stiffner (could be required, or not).


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