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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Posts
    574

    Default Column - support area

    Is this correct?

    I would have preferred the brick to be laying on the wide side but other than a wooden shim, Is there a minimum bearing area for column support? Can a brick be used in this manner?

    Are there any code issues with this set up?

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    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring Hill (Nashville), TN
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    5,847

    Default Re: Column - support area

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Amelin View Post
    Is this correct?

    I would have preferred the brick to be laying on the wide side but other than a wooden shim, Is there a minimum bearing area for column support? Can a brick be used in this manner?

    Are there any code issues with this set up?
    You need a solid cap on hollow CMU...

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Column - support area

    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Patterson
    You need a solid cap on hollow CMU...
    Scott,

    Your answer got my interest, so I tried to look it up in the code and in doing so I also found the answer to my own question.

    BOTTOM LINE - The brick on its side AND as Scott stated the hollow block is not correct.

    Here's what I found for anyones interest ...

    "IRC 2009 R606.14 Beam Supports"

    "Beams Girters or other concentrated loads supported by a wall or column shall have a bearing of at least 3 inches in length measured parallel to the beam upon solid masonry not less than 4 inches in thickness, or upon a metal bearing plate or adequate design and dimensions to distribute the load safely, or upon a continuous reinforced masonry member projecting not less than 4 inches from the face of the wall."

    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    leonardo, new jersey
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Column - support area

    That to me is a pier and falls under R606.6 Piers. and would need to have the cellular spaces filled solid not to mention the blocks laid in a stack bond which filling solid would answer that. It should also have an anchor attachment as part of it's continual load path.

    The Kiln fire brick would maybe have a psi of 1200 and is designed as a veneer to withstand its own weight within that wall design. If a CMU filled with type M is 3000 psi and meets the the code for most 2 story residential constructed walls, theres no way that little brick is.

    Joseph Ehrhardt
    Building Forensic Specialist LLC

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Column - support area

    Joe,

    Interesting - Thanks.

    Now that you have tangled this web - what is the defference between a pier and a column?

    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    leonardo, new jersey
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Column - support area

    Your welcome Ken...

    under the Dictionary of Architecture 3rd addition;

    column 1. In structures, a relatively long , slender structural compression member such as a post, pillar, or strut; usually vertical,supporting a load which acts in (or near) the direction of its longitudinal axis 2. in classical architecture, a cylindrical support consisting of a base (except in Greek Doric), shaft, and capital; eithe monolithic or built up of drums the full diameter of the shaft. 3 A pillar standing alone as a monument.

    pier 1. A column designed to support concentrated load. 2. A member, usually in the form of a thickened section, which forms an integral part of a wall; usually placed at intervals along the concentrated vertical loads.

    I would say "in my proffesional opinion" its non decorative, supporting a concentrated load in the crawlspace= a pier....but wait, if you wrote all the names on it of who is screwing us in our own country... would it then become a pillar standing alone as a monument= column???

    Joseph Ehrhardt
    Building Forensic Specialist LLC

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