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  1. #1
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    Default Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Sparks,NV
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    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    It's both. It's 30% less lumber but also allows for thicker insulation. The other benefit is that it takes the wall framing factor from 25% for a 2x4 wall to 15% so you get more insulation and less wood. This raised the over all r-value closer to the insulation rating. Other ways of advanced framing it to make the walls all 2' increments and the windows and doors fall on an existing stud so that way you don't have a bunch of wood built up.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Ernst View Post
    It's both. It's 30% less lumber but also allows for thicker insulation. The other benefit is that it takes the wall framing factor from 25% for a 2x4 wall to 15% so you get more insulation and less wood. This raised the over all r-value closer to the insulation rating. Other ways of advanced framing it to make the walls all 2' increments and the windows and doors fall on an existing stud so that way you don't have a bunch of wood built up.
    Tougher Energy Codes Push Framing Forward - Energy-Efficient Construction, Framing, Codes And Standards - EcoHome Magazine

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  4. #4
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    I saw the insulated engineered stud on that page at the bottom. Build with sips and eliminate them almost altogether.
    '
    I also love the idea that overall sips cost 8 to 10 grand more to build a home but they put in the cost savings for labor to erect them and electricians costs are cut down for rough in. Kind of sounds to me that cost are not being cut anywhere and the price of building is just elevating.

    Oh yeah. Hi Aaron. Hows it going?


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,777

    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    Juggle the numbers to make it look the way you want. SIP have good and bad points.
    Part of the labor savings is in how they calculate the lower $/hr rates used in the process. Though it may not be realistic, but looks good on paper. It is a higher priced product that does offer off setting costs though you have to look at it long term. Big problem is that people move to often to get the benefits early on.


  6. #6
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    Engineered lumber is better on longer spans. Less deflection, less noise & less wood. The problem I have seen is getting field people, ( plumbers, electricians, etc. ), to learn what is allowable regarding penetrations and to abide by it.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Santa Rosa, CA
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    2,478

    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    The other problem that I have seen with engineered lumber (TJIs, etc.) is the lack of resistance to rot/damage. It does not take much in the way of a leak or inadequate ventilation to cause damage.

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    North Central Texas
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    472

    Default Re: Better Framing or Just Cheaper Framing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    The other problem that I have seen with engineered lumber (TJIs, etc.) is the lack of resistance to rot/damage. It does not take much in the way of a leak or inadequate ventilation to cause damage.
    Gunnar: Agreed. Too often I find engineered lumber in harm's way, e.g. in the drainage plane behind brick and stone veneer. Even though these materials have been in use for decades many contractors still do not have a clear picture of how to use them properly. While cheaper can be better, it is not a given.

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