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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada, Québec, Brossard
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    30

    Default beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Hi,

    I noticed that the colons of the beam supporting the second floor, were installed directly on the first floor's floor. I would rather see these colons passing through the floor going to the basement and be placed on a footing, but my question is, is this installation somehow bad for the house? The second floor is sagging. Could it be related?

    House was built in 1900 and was lifted up to install a new foundation in 2007. The owner told me that the second floor sagged only after jacking the house.

    Thx in advance for your help.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    If the second floor is sagging I'd be recommending a engineer to provide a further assessment.

    The support beam and column have been added in an attempt to shore up the second floor.

    The question remains whether or not the jacking and subsequent support have been done properly. Big question mark in my mind.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,778

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Eli,
    Columns siting on a floor is not the issue. Transference of load is the issue. The load must be supported to the footers.

    I would question if a bearing wall was removed and a beam with columns used to transfer load from the second floor.
    If the beam is undersized the second floor will sag,
    If the column length is wrong the second floor will sag.
    If the columns are not placed for direct transfer of load the second floor will sag.
    If the post/column in the basement is incorrect in length or support (footer) there will be compression and the second floor will sag.

    Have seen to often after lifting a structure that the replacement support is off by a little, causing a lot of problems. Many people do not want the correct sized beam due to blocking the newly opened up wall opening. So a doubled up 2x12 is reduced to a doubled 2x6 or 2x8 which to often just not enough for the span created.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bozeman, Montana
    Posts
    91

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Eli,
    As Gary said, transfer of the load is the key. That being said, if this home was built in 1900 it was probably balloon framed. This would introduce more variables when lifted and resetting. Also it appears the beams are box beams, so outward appearance may not tell what the actual beam is.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
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    5,005

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    for your info

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Spring City/Surrounding Philadelphia area
    Posts
    3,473

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    All I can say is if somebody wants to try and have a load bear on my colon, there's gonna be trouble.

    "It takes a big man to cry. It takes an even bigger man to laugh at that man". - Jack Handey

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,828

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Ah Nick!!! another laugh for the ages
    If you have trouble over there callinaaahskamee


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snowbird (this means I'm retired and migrate between locations), FL/MI
    Posts
    4,086

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Ostrowski View Post
    All I can say is if somebody wants to try and have a load bear on my colon, there's gonna be trouble.
    Nick, that was priceless!


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Recommend colonoscopy by licensed physician.

    The above statements are expressed solely as my opinion and in all probability will conflict with someone else's.
    Stu, Fredericksburg VA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Hercules, CA
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    As has been elucidated above, the issue is load bearing. You need to go to the crawl space and see what the column is sitting on, if anything. Load transfer can be accomplished by installing posts and/or blocking (but usually not elements of the human digestive tract), or sometimes adjustable steel jacks, as long as the load eventually transfers to the foundation.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  11. #11
    Garry Blankenship's Avatar
    Garry Blankenship Guest

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Ostrowski View Post
    All I can say is if somebody wants to try and have a load bear on my colon, there's gonna be trouble.
    More recycled fiber will clear this all up. It's the Green thing to do.


  12. #12
    Darrel Hood's Avatar
    Darrel Hood Guest

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    To get more fiber, eat a 2x4. However, I hear the PT ones don't taste good.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    michigan
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: beam's colons on first floor's floor.

    Use guys are brutal! I thought I'd comment on Eli's colon also... butt that would just be bad taste.

    Hope you have thick skin Eli, you'll need it around here with these buttmunches.


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