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  1. #1
    mattjung's Avatar
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    Default Is this Sheating up to Code

    Hello inpectors,

    This is a new home. I was wondering if this gap at the corner acceptable.

    Thanks
    Matt

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    I was wondering if this is a joke.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Are those hole from over-driven nails ... from staples ... from T-nails?

    I'd be more concerned about how it was fastened in place.

    If properly fastened in place, then a small piece of sheathing could be nailed into the gap and make a flat surface for the building wrap and whatever siding is going on, plus you would want something there to help nail the siding and trim to at those corners.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  4. #4
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    mattjung Guest

    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Thanks Jerry,

    Yes the holes are from over driven nails. I attached a zoom in image of that part. The house is going to have stucco over it


    Matt

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Quote Originally Posted by mattjung View Post
    Yes the holes are from over driven nails.
    Then that sheathing needs to be re-nailed properly with the air pressure set to *not* overdrive the nails.

    I called that out one day (I said that overdriven nails have no rating) and the contractors engineer on-site at the time said I was incorrect ... so I asked him what the rating was ... he said 'Oh, it has a rating, not much of a rating, and it depends on how many of the nails are overdriven and how far in the are overdriven ... I then pointed out the sheathing I was referring to and he said ... 'With almost all of the nails overdriven by as much as those are overdriven - oh, not much of a rating at all' ... I then asked just how incorrect I was when I said that the overdriven nails had no rating - he paused, thought a minute, then said 'You were pretty close', then added 'I will have the contractor re-nail the sheathing properly' ...

    Kind of looked like your photo, and probably 90% of the nails were overdriven like that.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  6. #6
    mattjung's Avatar
    mattjung Guest

    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Thanks Jerry

    I will bring to attention of the superintendent. The county inspector already caught many other issues like missing nails, I am wondering now if the entire roof sheathing was over driven but it was not inspected yet since it failed prior county inspections.

    thanks again

    Matt


  7. #7
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Countersunk nails can't be controlled with air pressure. It takes a flush nail attachment on the gun to do that.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Quote Originally Posted by David Bertrams View Post
    Countersunk nails can't be controlled with air pressure. It takes a flush nail attachment on the gun to do that.
    "Countersunk nails can't be controlled with air pressure."

    Actually, for the most part, overdriven nails *can* be controlled by air pressure control - many framers do it, and they do it by adding a second regulator at the gun to control the pressure much more finitely and they can control and stop overdriving the nails (until they hit a void, then the nail goes in anyway, which it would likely go into the void even with a flush nail attachment on the gun).

    The regulator at the compressor tank does its thing and keeps a certain minimum pressure in the tanks, and the regulator at the gun is set below that minimum pressure in the tanks, thereby regulating the pressure within closer limits and keep from starting out shooting nails with high pressure and ending shooting nails with low pressure in one nailing sweep up or across the sheathing.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Is this Sheating up to Code

    Re counter sunk nails.
    I have a little side business where I build things for a couple companies in Oak Ridge (secret stuff). For the most part I use a Bostich N80 coil nailer that has an adjustable nail depth. I can set the nail depth regardless of the air pressure.
    I got a job building a bunch of crates and use two differnet size nails. To speed up the process I bought another nailer on Craigslist. It was a Bostich N70 coil nailer. It does not have an adjustable nail depth.
    I was trying it out and it was overdriving the nails. Since there wasn't an adjustable depth for the gun, I played with the air pressure. I was not successful getting the gun to not over drive the nails into OSB. I could get it nail into 2x lumber fine, but OSB was quite another thing.
    Depends on the nailer I guess.

    I just bought another N80 with adjustable nail depth on E-Bay. Now I have to sell the N70 I just rebuilt.


  10. #10
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    Default Re: Is this Sheathing up to Code

    APA (American Plywood Association) has a document on overdriven fasteners called "Technical Topics: Effect of Overdriven Fasteners On Shear Capacity." A free registration is required to access it.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Is this Sheathing up to Code

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Huggett View Post
    APA (American Plywood Association) has a document on overdriven fasteners called "Technical Topics: Effect of Overdriven Fasteners On Shear Capacity." A free registration is required to access it.
    Thom,

    That's for shear forces. Most of what I am referring to is uplift (remember, I am in Florida, the 'Plywood State')

    Of course, some of y'all 'up there' had it worse than we did 'done here' from Hurricane Sandy.

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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Is this Sheathing up to Code

    Getting back to the original question, there are wall corner details in Figure R602.10.4.4 in the IRC which may be helpful.

    Jerry, shear and uplift go hand in hand. You don't have uplift without shear, although uplift is often counteracted by the weight of the roof or floor bearing on top of the wall.

    The technical guide I referenced is very practical, and not just a guide for engineers. It defines what it means by "overdriven" and gives a practical guide on how to correct the situation. You may have to register to access the link: http://www.apawood.org/level_c.cfm?c...F=Yes&pubGroup=

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Is this Sheathing up to Code

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Huggett View Post
    Jerry, shear and uplift go hand in hand. You don't have uplift without shear, although uplift is often counteracted by the weight of the roof or floor bearing on top of the wall.
    Shear and uplift are two distinctly different things.

    Pullout and uplift are the same thing.

    To clarify - I am referring to roof sheathing.

    Just making sure that my statement is not taken as a blanket statement.

    Wall sheathing is mainly shear.

    Now to complicate it some more - there is also shear on the roof sheathing, as well as there is negative pressure trying to pull the wall sheathing off (similar to pullout and uplift).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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