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  1. #1
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    Oct 2007
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    Default Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Has anyone encountered structural issues with garage storage racks? In this case the drywall was badly cracked from the weight of the rack and possibly what was stored..(the home was vacant at the time of inspection). I inspected the truss chords and did not find any fractures, but I am confident that weight caused this. Is there any documentation I can provide to my client regarding this situation? Thank you for your insight as always.

    Chris

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  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Plano, Texas
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    No documentation of which I am aware. I would just report what I saw along with my suspicions and leave it at that.

    Jim Luttrall
    www.MrInspector.net
    Plano, Texas

  3. #3
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    Jan 2011
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    Guelph,Ontario
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    The ceiling framing members were designed to carry the loads of the roof,etc, they were not designed for additional loads.


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Looks like a mud ed tape joint not drywall crack caused by the garage door opener.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Stephens View Post
    Looks like a mud ed tape joint not drywall crack caused by the garage door opener.
    Used to seeing those Billy...not the case here.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Stichter View Post
    Used to seeing those Billy...not the case here.
    You were there gotta go with it.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2011
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    Hercules, CA
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Roof trusses are designed to only support 10 pounds/square foot of live load on the bottom cord in addition to the dead load weight of insulation and sheetrock, usually about 5 psf. This comes from IBC Table 1607.1, item #27, or IRC Table R301.5.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Huggett View Post
    Roof trusses are designed to only support 10 pounds/square foot of live load on the bottom cord in addition to the dead load weight of insulation and sheetrock, usually about 5 psf. This comes from IBC Table 1607.1, item #27, or IRC Table R301.5.
    Unless the headroom exceeds (as I recall) 42", then the bottom chord is required to be designed for a storage weight, 40 psf comes to mind ... and, no, I did not look those two numbers up so I am sure that someone will look those two requirements up and correct me - good, that's what we do here for each other.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    The chords of the trusses are covered with dust. How can you be sure there was storage up there?

    I would call for a drywall repair and let someone else be Sherlock.
    I agree I don't see evidence of storage. Usually there will be plywood to support between the trusses.

    Greg Filian
    http://www.MobileHomeInspectors.com
    714 612-3564

  10. #10
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    Nov 2011
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    Oregon, USA
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Filian View Post
    I agree I don't see evidence of storage. Usually there will be plywood to support between the trusses.
    The storage didn't take place in the attic, but rather on the metal-grid storage shelf area (supported by flimsy strap angles), below the ceiling sheetrock. The details shown would indicate that significant point loads were applied to the trusses' bottom chords at the angles' attachment points. If you want "official" documentation, I suspect the truss manufacturer (name should be stenciled on each truss) would gladly furnish a statement saying their products are not designed for bottom chord point loads greater than "X" pounds.


  11. #11
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    Florida
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy Stephens View Post
    Looks like a mud ed tape joint not drywall crack caused by the garage door opener.
    Billy, check the attic picture and then the ceiling picture. No sheetrock joint next to the beam where is is cracked in the ceiling. Maybe they used the frame as a hoisting point for something.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    I'm thinking the trusses are designed to support more than just the drywall, since they seem to handle supporting garage doors and door openers without much of an issue.


  13. #13
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    Aug 2011
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    Hercules, CA
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    158

    Default Re: Garage Ceiling Storage Rack

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Unless the headroom exceeds (as I recall) 42", then the bottom chord is required to be designed for a storage weight, 40 psf comes to mind ... and, no, I did not look those two numbers up so I am sure that someone will look those two requirements up and correct me - good, that's what we do here for each other.
    You are correct, except it is 20 psf, not 40 psf. There are 2 footnotes (b and g) to IRC Table R301.5 which give the criteria for whether 10 psf or 20 psf is to be used. There is also a provision for 30 psf when there is a regular or pull-down stairway to the attic area. I suggest that the provisions be read to get a clear understanding of how they apply. My guess is that only 10 psf live load was used in the design of these roof trusses.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Unless the headroom exceeds (as I recall) 42", then the bottom chord is required to be designed for a storage weight, 40 psf comes to mind ... and, no, I did not look those two numbers up so I am sure that someone will look those two requirements up and correct me - good, that's what we do here for each other.
    You are correct, except it is 20 psf, not 40 psf. There are 2 footnotes (b and g) to IRC Table R301.5 which give the criteria for whether 10 psf or 20 psf is to be used. There is also a provision for 30 psf when there is a regular or pull-down stairway to the attic area. I suggest that the provisions be read to get a clear understanding of how they apply. My guess is that only 10 psf live load was used in the design of these roof trusses.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Unless the headroom exceeds (as I recall) 42", then the bottom chord is required to be designed for a storage weight, 40 psf comes to mind ... and, no, I did not look those two numbers up so I am sure that someone will look those two requirements up and correct me - good, that's what we do here for each other.
    You are correct, except it is 20 psf, not 40 psf. There are 2 footnotes (b and g) to IRC Table R301.5 which give the criteria for whether 10 psf or 20 psf is to be used. There is also a provision for 30 psf when there is a regular or pull-down stairway to the attic area. I suggest that the provisions be read to get a clear understanding of how they apply. My guess is that only 10 psf live load was used in the design of these roof trusses.

    Thom Huggett, PE, SE, CBO

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