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  1. #1
    Clay White's Avatar
    Clay White Guest

    Default Cracks through bricks

    Last edited by Clay White; 01-02-2008 at 01:18 PM.
    OREP Home Inspector E&O Insurance 2

  2. #2
    Richard Stanley's Avatar
    Richard Stanley Guest

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    Cracked / broken bricks need replacement.
    Defective grout needs tuck pointing.
    I don't see any weeps in the soldier course.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Memphis TN.
    Posts
    4,311

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    Quote Originally Posted by Clay White View Post

    No other interior (or exterior) evidence of movement.

    What would you guys recommend, a SE to determine cause and repairs needed? (1997 home).
    Clay,

    No.

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  4. #4
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    While structural issues can cause damage to the bricks, the brick itself is a siding. No different than vinyl or wood siding.

    If there were signs of settlement that could have caused this, a SE should be recommended. Did you know that metal can expand up to 7 times it's original size as it is allowed to rust in an area where the oxidization can not flake off, such as in a metal lintle.

    The damaged brick does need repair as it is no longer water tight.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,313

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    The damaged brick does need repair as it is no longer water tight.
    While the damaged brick does need "replacement", brick is also 'not water tight' to begin with, hence the need for weep holes.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Jon Randolph's Avatar
    Jon Randolph Guest

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    While the damaged brick does need "replacement", brick is also 'not water tight' to begin with, hence the need for weep holes.

    Correct, replacement is needed. Bricks do shed water from their surface. I realize that they will wick water and do hold moisture but they shed the majority of the water. Any compromize to the glazed surface, even minor spalling, is need of replacement in my opinion.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,313

    Default Re: Cracks through bricks

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Randolph View Post
    Any compromize to the glazed surface, even minor spalling, is need of replacement in my opinion.

    It's not "the bricks", it's "the mortar" between the bricks, through which most of the water/moisture goes.

    'The bricks" are somewhat good at shedding water ... sheds it right down to the mortar joints, where the water seeps in.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    South-West Michigan
    Posts
    469

    Post Re: Cracks through bricks

    The amount of moisture brick will absorb when exposed to rain or snow depends on how it was fired. Brick intended for exterior applications will typically be fired longer, thereby increasing the water resistance. In cold climates, improper application of brick [such as an exterior application of brick intended for interior use] can result in serious problems.

    However, this particular situation requires dealing with the underlying cause of the failure of the mortar bond and the cracked brick. Cracks at the mortar bond are less serious than cracked brick veneer. The underlying cause of movement must be addressed, in order for the repair to take. Chances are good that the steel lintel was improperly installed.

    One option would be to write it as repair needed, and leave it to the builder or contractor to do it right. Unfortunately, that may be very expensive in this particular situation. The positive side is that your client is getting their money's worth from the inspection.

    Randall Aldering GHI BAOM MSM
    Housesmithe Inspection
    www.housesmithe.com

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