Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    92

    Default Newb doing some practice runs

    So I inspected my buddy's house and found this beam flaking away. How serious is this? The beam seamed stable and it was just the one but I've never seen so much rust

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Inspection Referral SOC

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Windsor Ontario
    Posts
    363

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Based on what can see in the photos - there appears to be a high moisture content in this location. Possibly by water seepage/or penetration and/or possibly high humidity.

    I look forward to seeing other comments to help our newb.

    Cheers......


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    No major concern if you are tearing the house down (razing).

    Else it appears to be a supporting structural members and should be addressed. Addressed on two levels, one being why is it rusting and the other what is it supporting.

    I beams are rated by their design and material thickness. As the material rusts away the load capacity decreases.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    thanks guys! Its much appreciated!


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,246

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Do you have a close up photo of that beam?

    From what I see ... don't see ... is the web in between the top and bottom flanges - looks like it is already gone ... what is that whitish/brownish color thing with the dark dots?

    What is the web of that beam (did you poke it and get 'hands on' to it)?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    The bigger picture shows there is much more going on than just a rusted i-beam. Big water entry problems, mould substance on ceiling, rotted rim joist (upper right). Old house, bad grading, stone rubble foundation, wood column likely rotted at bottom, leaky basement, either dirt floor, or heaved concrete.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Do you have a close up photo of that beam?

    From what I see ... don't see ... is the web in between the top and bottom flanges - looks like it is already gone ... what is that whitish/brownish color thing with the dark dots?

    What is the web of that beam (did you poke it and get 'hands on' to it)?



    The thing with the spots on it is the center of the I beam itself. these are the closest pics I got. Ill def get closer next time. The bottom of the I beam flaked away when i poke it with the screwdriver but the center of it was sturdy with no flaking.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Chicago IL
    Posts
    1,984

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    You buddy needs to get his poor water management or leaking issues under control as quickly as possible. Looks like a typical U channel type steel beam bolted to the wall to support the joists. That situation won't be a problem until its too late. There will be a lack of support at some point if your buddy doesn't deal with the issues and he'll be screwed.
    Based on what it looks like the beam already needs replacement.

    www.aic-chicago.com
    773/844-4AIC
    "The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Lansdale, PA
    Posts
    876

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    A suggestion, not being picky, work on taking better photos. On structural issues and many other issues it is good to have an overall photo, like you do, and closeups. A little closer would help. Also, it seems like the photos are blurry or very low resolution. Many home inspectors take photos with too low a resolution. I may be picky about this because I am a structural engineer and often get send home inspection reports. I like to get an idea as to whether something really needs to be looked at by an engineer. Sometimes I have no idea based on the wording or the photos.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,246

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Reinmiller View Post
    A suggestion, not being picky, work on taking better photos. On structural issues and many other issues it is good to have an overall photo, like you do, and closeups. A little closer would help. Also, it seems like the photos are blurry or very low resolution. Many home inspectors take photos with too low a resolution. I may be picky about this because I am a structural engineer and often get send home inspection reports. I like to get an idea as to whether something really needs to be looked at by an engineer. Sometimes I have no idea based on the wording or the photos.
    Mark,

    Not being picky, but it's not the resolution ... it's the focus.

    A 640 x 480 resolution photo (remember those days) provides a very good photo when viewed on a computer screen. The mega pixel photos only help when viewed on very large screens or when blown up in size for poster printing.

    See the 640 x 480 photo below - it's the focus, not the resolution ... (and lighting/flash as necessary) ... the photo below was taken over 15 years ago with what was then the standard format of 640 x 480 resolution.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    MONTREAL QUEBEC-CANADA
    Posts
    1,840

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    It appears the foundation is wicking water up.
    Efflorescence all over the concrete.
    Suspect perimeter drainage.

    No capillary break between the materials.
    The steel H beam has oxidized.

    Building science 101.

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
    Our Motto; Putting information where you need it most, "In your hands.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    MONTREAL QUEBEC-CANADA
    Posts
    1,840

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Keller View Post
    Looks like a typical U channel type steel beam bolted to the wall to support the joists.
    Never seen that type of wall support.
    Any articles would be appreciated.

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
    Our Motto; Putting information where you need it most, "In your hands.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,478

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Three problems (in my opinion) with taking high resolution pics.

    1) Size of report. Some reports will resize the photo and others will not. As a result, the report may end up too large to email to some folks who have restrictions on their email.

    2) Storage of reports and pics. Large format pics take up a lot of space. If an inspector is taking 100+/- pics per report and doing 7-10 inspections per week, that can end up with well over 100,000 pics per year.

    3) Large pics can be zoomed-in on. That can be an advantage or disadvantage, if the inspector is not paying attention to the background.

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Reinmiller View Post
    A suggestion, not being picky, work on taking better photos. On structural issues and many other issues it is good to have an overall photo, like you do, and closeups. A little closer would help. Also, it seems like the photos are blurry or very low resolution. Many home inspectors take photos with too low a resolution. I may be picky about this because I am a structural engineer and often get send home inspection reports. I like to get an idea as to whether something really needs to be looked at by an engineer. Sometimes I have no idea based on the wording or the photos.
    good advice thank you very much and Ill look into the problem

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Mark,

    Not being picky, but it's not the resolution ... it's the focus.

    A 640 x 480 resolution photo (remember those days) provides a very good photo when viewed on a computer screen. The mega pixel photos only help when viewed on very large screens or when blown up in size for poster printing.

    See the 640 x 480 photo below - it's the focus, not the resolution ... (and lighting/flash as necessary) ... the photo below was taken over 15 years ago with what was then the standard format of 640 x 480 resolution.
    thanks Ill look into the issues


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    MONTREAL QUEBEC-CANADA
    Posts
    1,840

    Default Re: Newb doing some practice runs

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    Three problems (in my opinion) with taking high resolution pics.

    1) Size of report. Some reports will resize the photo and others will not. As a result, the report may end up too large to email to some folks who have restrictions on their email.

    2) Storage of reports and pics. Large format pics take up a lot of space. If an inspector is taking 100+/- pics per report and doing 7-10 inspections per week, that can end up with well over 100,000 pics per year.

    3) Large pics can be zoomed-in on. That can be an advantage or disadvantage, if the inspector is not paying attention to the background.
    Gunner, I think the idea is focus and lighting. As Jerry said, A 640 x 480 resolution photo (remember those days) provides a very good photo when viewed on a computer screen. The mega pixel photos only help when viewed on very large screens or when blown up in size for poster printing.

    1: High resolution point and shoot cameras point images can be compressed.
    A report deals with defect narratives. Images are utilized to point out the defect or deficiency.

    2: As for storage. I as well as many other home inspectors, and photographers, store images on a separate hard drive. I use a 3 terabyte disk platte on a sata connection. The drive can be hooked up via USB, SATA, eSATA, or cloud based.
    I also have 1.5 terabytes SSD in my PC and transfer images seamlessly to any drive I wish.

    3: Taking images from several angles and distances will allow flexibility when editing. Focus and lighting allow a good clean noiseless image to start from.

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
    Our Motto; Putting information where you need it most, "In your hands.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •