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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    McKinney Texas
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    475

    Default Self lifting scaffolding

    I saw these guys today using self lifting scaffolding. It works like an old time car jack. The long tall piers are the backbone. See the guy in the red shirt stepping on the jack. Up and down he goes with his foot until it raises the walking platform.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,777

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Pump Jacks...


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Birmingham, Al.
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    41

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Wish we had some of that rain here in Alabama. I like the pump jacks with the steel uprights much better than the ones which ran up doubled 2 X 4s.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Used them all the time to install siding back in 80's except I couldn't afford the metal equipment. Used wood poles and picks. Wasn't very safe.

    Peak Inspection Services | Over 32 Years of Contractor Experience!
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,251

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Warning ... large wave headed this way ... thread drifting ...

    The wood for the supporting columns of that porch roof do not look like they are pressure treated (or approved natural decay resistance):
    - From the IRC: (underlining is mine)
    - - R317.1.4 Wood columns. - - - Wood columns shall be approved wood of natural decay resistance or approved pressure-preservative-treated wood.
    - - - - Exceptions:
    - - - - - 1. Columns exposed to the weather or in basements when supported by concrete piers or metal pedestals projecting 1 inch (25.4 mm) above a concrete floor or 6 inches (152 mm) above exposed earth and the earth is covered by an approved impervious moisture barrier.
    - - - - - 2. Columns in enclosed crawl spaces or unexcavated areas located within the periphery of the building when supported by a concrete pier or metal pedestal at a height more than 8 inches (203 mm) from exposed earth and the earth is covered by an impervious moisture barrier.

    Additionally, any sheathing within 6 inches from the ground or less than 2 inches measured vertically from concrete steps, porch slabs needs to be pressure treated (or of naturally durable wood): (underlining is mine)
    - From the IRC:
    - - R317.1 Location required.
    - - - Protection of wood and wood based products from decay shall be provided in the following locations by the use of naturally durable wood or wood that is preservative-treated in accordance with AWPA U1 for the species, product, preservative and end use. Preservatives shall be listed in Section 4 of AWPA U1.
    - - - - 1. Wood joists or the bottom of a wood structural floor when closer than 18 inches (457 mm) or wood girders when closer than 12 inches (305 mm) to the exposed ground in crawl spaces or unexcavated area located within the periphery of the building foundation.
    - - - - 2. All wood framing members that rest on concrete or masonry exterior foundation walls and are less than 8 inches (203 mm) from the exposed ground.
    - - - - 3. Sills and sleepers on a concrete or masonry slab that is in direct contact with the ground unless separated from such slab by an impervious moisture barrier.
    - - - - 4. The ends of wood girders entering exterior masonry or concrete walls having clearances of less than 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) on tops, sides and ends.
    - - - - 5. Wood siding, sheathing and wall framing on the exterior of a building having a clearance of less than 6 inches (152 mm) from the ground or less than 2 inches (51 mm) measured vertically from concrete steps, porch slabs, patio slabs, and similar horizontal surfaces exposed to the weather.
    - - - - 6. Wood structural members supporting moisture-permeable floors or roofs that are exposed to the weather, such as concrete or masonry slabs, unless separated from such floors or roofs by an impervious moisture barrier.
    - - - - 7. Wood furring strips or other wood framing members attached directly to the interior of exterior masonry walls or concrete walls below grade except where an approved vapor retarder is applied between the wall and the furring strips or framing members.

    Using non-pressure treated wood for those columns is a common error, and it seems that no one even thinks about the sheathing requirements either.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    McKinney Texas
    Posts
    475

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    This was not a house that I was inspecting, by the way.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Also, if you're gonna frame the roof, it's 10 times faster and easier to make the fascia cuts on the ground before you install the rafters.

    Peak Inspection Services | Over 32 Years of Contractor Experience!
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,251

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene South View Post
    This was not a house that I was inspecting, by the way.
    Understood from the photos (taken from a house next door, I presume).

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Payson View Post
    Also, if you're gonna frame the roof, it's 10 times faster and easier to make the fascia cuts on the ground before you install the rafters.
    Nah ... they end up uneven that way ... string 'em ... mark 'em ... an cut 'em after installation of the trusses (not safer, but that's the way they do it so the ends align ... somewhat align).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Nah ... they end up uneven that way ... string 'em ... mark 'em ... an cut 'em after installation of the trusses (not safer, but that's the way they do it so the ends align ... somewhat align)
    No competent framer would ever do it that way.

    Peak Inspection Services | Over 32 Years of Contractor Experience!
    Residential Inspections | Commercial Inspections
    Office: 908-750-6789 | www.peakinspectionservices.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,251

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Payson View Post
    No competent framer would ever do it that way.
    I haven't seen a competent framer in 30-40 years ... remember ... I am in Florida where we have workers and laborers.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    MONTREAL QUEBEC-CANADA
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Self lifting scaffolding

    I was a special maneuver tradesperson. It was a ticket/certification. I setup and operated any machinery on commercial and residential construction sites. That includes scaffolding of many types and bolsums chairs..
    That is how I maneuvered around and learned trades.


    I erected Pump jack steel column scaffolding. Been some time since I framed. Early 1980's when I can back from Alberta. Oil fields lost many men in 1981.
    The unions revoked my union trade tickets, roofer class B, appearance mason, status because I worked Alberta. Quebec recognised no other trade jurisdictions other than their own. Bad times for Quebec tradesmen. Union lost over 40% of tradesmen.

    I worked rural areas and most professional wall framer's and siding companies used wood post Wall Jacks. There was a height limit.

    Later on I worked brick walls on hung rafters. Steel dog's, spikes, driven into mortar butt joint with a 4 pound mallet to hang a purchase. Commercial chimney repair guys know the technique.

    A pulley was attached with a rope pulled through the pulley and lowered to the ground man.
    The ground man would then fasten the rafter with the rope in such a way that allowed the rafter to lift plumb so you could nail the rafter into mortar butt joints after.
    Everything was sent up on pull and rope. As expressed, you set your pulley on off the top rung of a ladder or anchored purchase higher than your setup.

    Watch this video and others of Fred Dibnah. It sure brought back memories. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6W_7uIapoHc

    I set up full frame manual pump scaffolds. operated Ladder and Track hoists, swing and tract staging articulating aerial platforms up to 60 feet. Scaffolds up to 130' feet in the air.

    Robert Young's Montreal Home Inspection Services Inc.
    Call (514) 489-1887 or (514) 441-3732
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