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Thread: Steel framing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    292

    Default Steel framing

    I looked across the way from my inspection this morning and saw something I don't get to see very often around here...steel framing in residential construction. Yes I know it popular in some places but its rare here and it caught my eye.

    Naturally I had to get a closer look. Here's some photos in case your interested.

    For those of you who are familiar with this type of construction, I would be interested in hearing any comments you have about anything you see in the photos.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    292

    Default Re: Steel framing

    Also!

    Everything seemed to be pop-riveted together…no screws that I saw.


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Rockwall Texas
    Posts
    4,517

    Default Re: Steel framing

    Phillip,

    Don't have a clue of anything about them myself.

    But as a Termite control man, I can only think that maybe that is what heaven looks like.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    25,317

    Default Re: Steel framing

    Not familiar with it either, I usually only see non-structural metal studs interior framing (I've seen a few metal framed truss roofs, but only after-the-fact).

    First, all of that is likely galvanized to some degree, and making field cuts leaves exposed ends which typically would need to be treated (except for interior only pieces), meaning pieces in the exterior walls and the roof framing - I would think it would be needed.

    Second photo: I don't see very many, if any, permanent diagonal braces on the exterior walls. Wonder where the shear walls (main wind resisting force) are.

    Don't see any diagonal bracing on those roof trusses either.

    Third photo: Still don't see any diagonal bracing on those roof trusses. One little push or wind and the entire roof system could topple domino-like.

    Wonder if the trusses are 'clear span' or if those interior walls are load bearing, as it appears they were installed before the trusses.

    Fourth photo: are those stands for the AHU and WH? Is so, wonder if it is strong enough for the WH and if it is considered as 'protection from vehicle damage'? I would think it was not, I've seen cars hit things like that in garages and the cars just push the entire wall assembly into the house.

    Then, for the AHU (the left stand, if that is what it is for), what happens when the center support is cut out for return air?

    Fifth photo: Is that a stack of pre-assembled wall sections?

    Sixth photo: Wow, the driveway is already poured too!

    Seventh photo: Hmmm .... I don't see any fall protection for those workers up there walking on those walls ...

    I wonder if that truss, like wood trusses, needs a strongback (and I am not referring to the workers ) and needs to be lifted properly (as with wood trusses)?

    Eight photo: But then again, I've done that with wood trusses.

    Overall comment: I sure see a lot of "temporary" bracing, but "no" "permanent" bracing (such as diagonals, etc. - except for a few lateral braces on the truss bottom chords).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Tim Moreira's Avatar
    Tim Moreira Guest

    Default Re: Steel framing

    All I can tell you from a commercial/hospital point of view is:

    1. They don't burn for a fire, but if heated enough they will lose their structural integrity and bend/twist (think of 911).

    2. They are great for WDO problems.

    3. I have heard from installers that they can go faster (vs lumber construction) if done by a competent/experienced crew.

    4. They can be ordered in different gages/thickness for whatever the structural application is.

    5. They can be ordered in different lenghts for balloon framing.

    6. They come pre-punched for electrical, plumbing pipes to go through.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: Steel framing

    1. They cost about the same as wood 2x.
    2. Are lighter to work with
    3. Noisier to cut.
    4. up your band-aid budget
    5. all the other reasons listed in above posts


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    Posts
    1,072

    Default Re: Steel framing

    I hope all of it is bonded together and to the service panel.
    Keep us posted on the exterior materials if you can

    Mike Schulz License 393
    Affordable Home Inspections
    www.houseinspections.com

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