Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Default Does plumbing manifold in garage wall breach firewall?

    In a new home, our inspector flagged a Pex plumbing manifold in a wall between the garage and the interior hallway. He said the manifold, which has a plastic cover, violates the required firewall. The city building official disagreed, saying the use of 5/8-inch drywall makes the wall adequate.

    What do you say? The photo is of the manifold on the garage side of the wall.


    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Member Benefits1

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,159

    Default Re: Does plumbing manifold in garage wall breach firewall?

    First and foremost - unless some local (or state, etc ... I think I recall something about CA addressing something about a fire rated wall) code states otherwise - the wall between a dwelling and its private garage IS NOT a "firewall".

    Instead, that wall is simply a "separation" wall, and the International Residential Code (and codes based on that code, unless amended otherwise) only requires 1/2" gypsum board (drywall) ... on the garage side ... that's all.

    Penetrations through that wall, and through the gypsum board side on the garage side are to be sealed around to resist the free passage of flame (which doesn't even require 'fire caulk' (which is incorrect terminology itself, thus the " ' " single quotes).

    If that wall was a "firewall", then electrical panels, etc would not be allowed in that wall.

    With a separation wall with 1/2" gypsum board on it, that 1/2" gypsum needs to be maintained, i.e., it needs a 1/2" gypsum board (or equivalent) cover.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,159

    Default Re: Does plumbing manifold in garage wall breach firewall?

    Bob,

    I forgot to ask:
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hucker View Post
    The city building official disagreed, saying the use of 5/8-inch drywall makes the wall adequate.
    Where is the 5/8-inch drywall (gypsum board)? Is it on the other side of the wall? If so, then that is not what the code calls for, the code says on the garage side - which brings up the question: where are you and what code is applicable there? That is why is it important to include your LOCATION, which includes a city and state for the best help ... otherwise everything is only a guess.

    Is it on the garage side? With a plastic cover, there is no 5/8" gypsum board in the "opening" where the plastic cover goes.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4

    Default Re: Does plumbing manifold in garage wall breach firewall?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Bob,

    I forgot to ask:


    Where is the 5/8-inch drywall (gypsum board)? Is it on the other side of the wall? If so, then that is not what the code calls for, the code says on the garage side - which brings up the question: where are you and what code is applicable there? That is why is it important to include your LOCATION, which includes a city and state for the best help ... otherwise everything is only a guess.

    Is it on the garage side? With a plastic cover, there is no 5/8" gypsum board in the "opening" where the plastic cover goes.
    Thank you, Jerry.

    This house is in Missouri City, Texas, which is in the Houston area. I believe, but have not personally checked, that the 5/8" drywall is on the garage side, and of course the plastic cover over the manifold does not provide the same protection.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,159

    Default Re: Does plumbing manifold in garage wall breach firewall?

    Bob,

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hucker View Post
    This house is in Missouri City, Texas, which is in the Houston area.
    This ( https://www.iccsafe.org/about-icc/go...ons/map/texas/ ) shows that Texas is still on the 2000 IRC - unless a jurisdiction has adopted a different (more current) code.

    Being as the house is in the Houston area, and Houston has adopted the 2012 IRC ( https://www.publicworks.houstontx.go..._coh_codes.pdf ) , the applicable code may be the 2012 IRC ... may ... be.

    Houston has adopted amendments to the 2012 IRC ( https://edocs.publicworks.houstontx....amendments.pdf ) which state: (underlining is mine)
    - R302.6 Dwelling/garage fire separation. The garage shall be separated as required by Table R302.6. Openings in garage walls shall comply with Section R302.5. This provision does not apply to garage walls that are perpendicular to the adjacent dwelling unit wall. Attic disappearing stairs shall be permitted to be installed in the garage ceiling provided the exposed panel is not less than ⅜ inch thick fire-retardant-treated plywood or covered with a minimum 16 gage sheet metal.

    See R302.6 attached, separating from the residence and its attics is 1/2" gypsum board (that is the separation on the garage side).

    Note that openings are protected in accordance with R302.5 - see R302.5 attached, specifically R302.5.1 Opening protection ... except that this only 'sort of' applies as it is not an opening between the garage and the residence ... except that it is an opening through the required separation (no separation is required on the residence side, only the garage side, and that opening is through that separation - thus it is technically "an opening between" the residence and the garage.

    It is also not an R302.5.2 Duct penetration.

    Then there is R302.3 Other penetration - which it is not ... well sort of no and sort of yes ... as it is a "penetration through the separation" (see my note at R302.1 above); however, this is referring to (typically speaking) pipes, wiring, etc (item which are 'penetrating through' the separation and can be sealed around, that cover is more of an "opening" which requires a suitable cover/door than a "penetration" which can be sealed around.

    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •