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  1. #1

    Default Old truss design

    I just inspected a home built in or around 1971. The roof trusses were a bit unusual, to put it mildly. As shown in the pics the trusses have top chords (rafters) that are spliced towards the lower end. The upper chord is simply bolted to the lower chord. My concern is that, without attachments at two locations, the chords could simply hinge apart. I could not access the attic (full of insulation) but I tried to view as many of the rafter chord connections as I could. I did not see any of the chords hinging apart (due to a possible loosening of the bolts) but still: does anyone know if this truss design has had problems? I could recommend a PE but without any evidence of failure or movement, I think the same judgment could be made after looking at the pics.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
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    1,402

    Default Re: Old truss design

    Hinged trusses typically indicate a system (or home) built off-site and shipped to the location.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,818

    Default Re: Old truss design

    Quote Originally Posted by Dom D'Agostino View Post
    Hinged trusses typically indicate a system (or home) built off-site and shipped to the location.
    As Dom said, that indicates a manufactured home ... upper section of the roof folded over the lower roof section to give a lower overall towing height so it can clear lower bridges and overpasses.

    Do you have a photo of the ridge connection?

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4

    Default Re: Old truss design

    This was definitively a manufactured home. Sorry I didn't mention that. I accidently deteted the photo that woud show this at the ridge, where the two halves meet. Again, no distress was observed - but this was a dumb design in my opinion. By the way, I'd be interested to know what truss designs were prone to failure - but that could take up multiple threads.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Old truss design

    Quote Originally Posted by Ernie Simpson View Post
    This was definitively a manufactured home. Sorry I didn't mention that. I accidently deteted the photo that woud show this at the ridge, where the two halves meet. Again, no distress was observed - but this was a dumb design in my opinion. By the way, I'd be interested to know what truss designs were prone to failure - but that could take up multiple threads.

    48 years old no sign of stress or failure. Not that dumb of a design.

    Ken Amelin
    Cape Cod's Best Inspection Services
    www.midcapehomeinspection.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Old truss design

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Amelin View Post
    48 years old no sign of stress or failure. Not that dumb of a design.
    Agreed !


  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Rumney, N.H.
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    33

    Default Re: Old truss design

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    As Dom said, that indicates a manufactured home ... upper section of the roof folded over the lower roof section to give a lower overall towing height so it can clear lower bridges and overpasses.

    Do you have a photo of the ridge comany roof sheithing fasteners weree not connected to the rafters, as to structure , i recommned a structional engeneer, for further evalustion show
    I agree Jerry; In these pictures, for my report, I would write. -- " these pictures show roof sheathing, fasteners not secured to the rafters. I also recommend further evaluation by a structural engineer for live loads that may occur to this roof. "

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    As Dom said, that indicates a manufactured home ... upper section of the roof folded over the lower roof section to give a lower overall towing height so it can clear lower bridges and overpasses.

    Do you have a photo of the ridge comany roof sheithing fasteners weree not connected to the rafters, as to structure , i recommned a structional engeneer, for further evalustion show
    I agree Jerry; In these pictures, for my report, I would write. -- " these pictures show roof sheathing, fasteners not secured to the rafters. I also recommend further evaluation by a structural engineer for live loads that may occur to this roof. "


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