Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Raleigh
    Posts
    113

    Default Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    New construction. I thought the center 3rd rule of thumb no longer applied and columns (masonry piers, too) had to be centered squarely under the load. Anyone know where the language is in the code book referencing columns and/or piers and where a beam and/or girder rests on them?

    Similar Threads:
    ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images ***IMPORTANT*** You Need To Register To View Images
    F.I.R.E. Services

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,818

    Default Re: Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    Quote Originally Posted by Randall Clark View Post
    New construction. I thought the center 3rd rule of thumb no longer applied and columns (masonry piers, too) had to be centered squarely under the load. Anyone know where the language is in the code book referencing columns and/or piers and where a beam and/or girder rests on them?
    Randall,

    Lots of folks looking, no one responding.

    I am afraid that in my area of CA I do not run into steel much, so I have no specific recommendations. With wood post/girder connections, direct line-up is necessary, particularly when using metal hardware. In that case, I would put it in the report. If someone wanted documentation, I would point them to the hardware manufacturer's installation instructions.

    I can't tell from you pic, is the post attached to the girder?

    As far as a specific code, I do not have one for you. 505 in the CRC covers cold-formed steel. I assume the IRC is the same, but I don't know exactly where to find what you are looking for. Maybe refer to the building plans and/or engineer for clarification?

    Last edited by Gunnar Alquist; 03-15-2019 at 12:28 PM.
    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,162

    Default Re: Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    Maybe refer to the building plans and/or engineer for clarification?
    That's the correct answer.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    2,818

    Default Re: Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    That's the correct answer.
    Like a loose cannon, if I keep firing, I am liable to hit the target. Eventually.

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    27,162

    Default Re: Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnar Alquist View Post
    Like a loose cannon, if I keep firing, I am liable to hit the target. Eventually.
    That's why people used to use punt guns , then they were, as I recall, deemed illegal to use.

    https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/punt-gun-1910-1920/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTQQfKxkZpk

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Rolla, MO
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Steel column not under center 3rd of I-beam

    Steel basement support posts are only designed for concentric loads, i.e. the load must be centered over the post. The testing perform such as ICC-ESR-1767 do not test for eccentric (offset loads), tensile loads, bending loads or lateral loads. The placement of the beam over the post in your photo is eccentric loading, which creates bending loads in the post. In this case the contractor would need a structural engineer to calculate the bending stresses in the post to see if it's within the allowable limits. The cost of the engineer would far exceed the cost of another post and/or contract labor to just move the post. When you use a manufactured product such as a post most building codes refer you back to the manufacturer if its being used in a manner it was not designed for.

    Randy Mayo, P.E.
    Residential Engineering & Inspection Services
    http://www.rlmengineers.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •