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  1. #1
    Kevin Luce's Avatar
    Kevin Luce Guest

    Default Telescopic Adjustable columns

    Ran into an interesting situation. Came across a guy that acts like one of the captains on the Sopranos (the guy with the gray hair on both sides). The whole time he stood by the buyer and me, informing us that some of the things I pointed out were "not a big deal". When two hours were up, he informed us that we needed to go since he had some things he needed to do. I actually squeezed another hour in before it was insisted. They guy didn't scare me but it did make me think, being close to Chicago.

    Here is the question.

    Telescopic adjustable columns with concrete in them. I know it doesn't meet the diameter of three inches but it is filled with concrete. Should it be called out or not? I think I should report that further evaluation is recommend by a structural engineer. Am I right or does anyone have information saying something different?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    "Many inspectors in the U.S. encounter these telescopic columns in permanent use. This is a defect because no telescopic adjustable column has been evaluated by a U.S. evaluation firm and none of their manufacturers cite an engineering report to prove these columns' ability to carry a specific load..."

    Adjustable Steel Columns



  3. #3
    Joseph P. Hagarty's Avatar
    Joseph P. Hagarty Guest

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    They (Temporary Columns) are improperly installed.

    Threaded pin goes towards the floor for one.....


  4. #4
    Kevin Luce's Avatar
    Kevin Luce Guest

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph P. Hagarty View Post
    They (Temporary Columns) are improperly installed.

    Threaded pin goes towards the floor for one.....
    I'll have to look that one up. I thought it doesn't matter where the threaded pin goes as long as you make it so it cannot be moved. Examples would be setting it in concrete, securing it to the support beam, damaging the threads I guess would fall under that thought.


  5. #5
    Joseph P. Hagarty's Avatar
    Joseph P. Hagarty Guest

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Luce View Post

    I thought it doesn't matter where the threaded pin goes as long as you make it so it cannot be moved.
    The bar still in place to operate the threaded pin precludes that observation...............


  6. #6
    Chad Fabry's Avatar
    Chad Fabry Guest

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    I'll have to look that one up. I thought it doesn't matter where the threaded pin goes as long as you make it so it cannot be moved. Examples would be setting it in concrete, securing it to the support beam, damaging the threads I guess would fall under that thought.
    The threaded end is installed in concrete so that the load is not supported by the threads.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,822

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    I see those all the time but have never seen them filled with concrete. Are they filled after install as a stabilizer? And I always see them with the adjusting bar at the top. I always call them as improper but, Any links to code or websites out there? wayne


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    25,314

    Default Re: Telescopic Adjustable columns

    Quote Originally Posted by Chad Fabry View Post
    The threaded end is installed in concrete so that the load is not supported by the threads.
    Which means, I presume, that the threaded end is recessed down into a concrete footing area on a concrete footing, the adjustments for height made with the treaded screw, then, after final adjustments are made, the recessed down area is filled with concrete?

    I would say that it depends on the rating of those screw threads.

    I've used 90 ton floor jacks, threaded ones, where each jack, and its threads, are rated to take 90 tons. I believe in a recent thread elsewhere it was guesstimated that a small house might weight 50 to 100 tons, which means one jack, maybe two, to support the entire house (make that three to avoid balancing problems). Of course, I used to use 10 or more of those under one house while doing house leveling on older homes.

    To me, the weak link in those threaded adjustable columns would be the columns themselves. If the steel wall is not thick enough, and the column not large enough, a tall column could start to deflect (bend) at its mid-point. A typical compression bow like when one overloads a piece of wood by placing to much weight or load on its top - like a vertical ridge support which is bowed.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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