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  1. #1
    David J. Edens's Avatar
    David J. Edens Guest

    Default Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    My fellow HI's (sorry too much politics lately);

    On my phase inspections, I often see 2x4s used in load bearing and non-load bearing walls that have the pieces spliced together (look like gear teeth glued together. Is this acceptable? I tell people that it is fine for vertical compression. Do some areas not allow it?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
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    1,828

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    Do you have a picture. I have never seen a finger jointed 2x4 myself but would be interested to see one if that's what you are describing. If you don't take photo's that would be my first recommendation to you. Start taking photo's.


  3. #3
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    Quote Originally Posted by wayne soper View Post
    Do you have a picture. I have never seen a finger jointed 2x4 myself but would be interested to see one if that's what you are describing. If you don't take photo's that would be my first recommendation to you. Start taking photo's.
    Gees Wayne

    That is like saying you never saw a peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    Man that just made me hungry for a sandwich

    The answer to the question. The finger jointed studs are used all the time.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Memphis TN.
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    4,311

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    Lot's of Pictures.
    .
    http:Engineered Wood Products
    .

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
    Billy J. Stephens HI Service Memphis TN.

  5. #5
    Ted Menelly's Avatar
    Ted Menelly Guest

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    Finger jointed trim and jambs that I see on the exterior all the time I do not like. I see it seperating all the time.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
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    2,481

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    Quote Originally Posted by David J. Edens View Post
    I often see 2x4s used in load bearing and non-load bearing walls that have the pieces spliced together (look like gear teeth glued together.
    I see them periodically in floor joists. They have been around for 20-25 years around here. This is something that would go back to the manufacturer and their engineer. My understanding is that they can be used the same as solid wood. Remember, it took a few decades for builders to finally accept and start using plywood.

    I agree with Ted, the exterior finger jointed jamb and trim fails regularly. Protected within the building envelope they should be fine. I would say that there is little difference between properly manufactured finger-joint lumber and something like plywood or OSB. It is still relying on the adhesive.

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    26,252

    Default Re: Spliced 2x4s adequacy

    From the link Billy provided:

    (underlining and red text are mine for highlighting)
    Finger-jointed studs are just another way in which Universal makes the most of every piece of wood. Finger-jointed studs are made by bonding shorter sections of lumber into longer lumber using structural, water-resistant adhesives. The use of shorter segments reduces warping and adds strength. Made for vertical use only, these studs can be used interchangeably with unjointed studs.
    Universal offers an extensive mix of finger-jointed studs made from SPF or SYP, in lengths ranging from seven feet to twelve feet. The studs are available in any precision-end-trimmed length you need.
    Tested and Approved
    The quality of Universal’s finger-jointed studs is assured, because the studs must comply with visual grade rules and undergo regular testing within the plant. They are sampled during production several times per shift and tested for bond strength and adhesive durability.
    The grades for these studs are based on the same rules as those for unjointed lumber. Design values are also the same. But the wood in the joints actually meets stricter requirements—our structural finger joints must exhibit strength values that are more than twice the design value for the grade.
    SBCCI, BOCA, ICBO, and CABO all accept the use of structurally finger-jointed lumber for building design in the U.S.


    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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