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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Erwin, TN
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    Default Footing Compromised

    I have seen this in older homes mostly (compromised footing) but this was on a 1970 model home. It looked to me the grade below the footing has been cut out incorrectly straight down not at a 45 degree angle like it should be. Anyone have any knowledge in this area.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    Looking at the 4th photo as representative of what the others are also like, but not showing it, the 4th photo shows a block stem wall, either one course high or the top course of multiple courses - the footing would be below that, and the support for the footing would be at the bottom of the footing ... which means it depends on a few things, including: first and foremost - how far down is the bottom of the footing; followed by - what is its support (the soil/rock).

    If rock, then if it possible that the rock could be cut straight down at the edge of the footing (a bit foolish perhaps, but it should work).

    If soil, then it would depend on the angle of repose of the soil type, and if not known, then the 45 degree angle is typically a 'safe bet' as that places the load on the bottom of the footing down and out up to 45 degrees from the edges of the footing.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Erwin, TN
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    178

    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Looking at the 4th photo as representative of what the others are also like, but not showing it, the 4th photo shows a block stem wall, either one course high or the top course of multiple courses - the footing would be below that, and the support for the footing would be at the bottom of the footing ... which means it depends on a few things, including: first and foremost - how far down is the bottom of the footing; followed by - what is its support (the soil/rock).

    If rock, then if it possible that the rock could be cut straight down at the edge of the footing (a bit foolish perhaps, but it should work).

    If soil, then it would depend on the angle of repose of the soil type, and if not known, then the 45 degree angle is typically a 'safe bet' as that places the load on the bottom of the footing down and out up to 45 degrees from the edges of the footing.
    The top of the dirt mound looks like it had maybe 4" of concrete


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,534

    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    Good call. That is actually a serious issue that just hasn't manifested itself yet. The house is in danger of at least partially falling into that pit.

    As a remedy, I would suggest rebar, concrete forms and then pumped in concrete to build a continuous retaining wall where the dirt was dug away.

    (For a small job, ready mix concrete can be laid up like sandbags. Wet the bags and the concrete hardens in place.)

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Morris View Post
    The top of the dirt mound looks like it had maybe 4" of concrete
    If that is all which is under the block shown in the photo - I would not refer to it as a footing because it wouldn't meet the requirements for a footing.

    Making the issue even worse.

    Recommend that a structural engineer design appropriate repairs, then after the repairs are completed, the same engineer to issue a signed and sealed engineer's letter stating that the repairs were completed in accordance with the engineering design (which likely means that the engineer would need to inspect the work while it was being done).

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Windsor Ontario
    Posts
    362

    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    It's known as "angle of repose".
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMNwl2Cg780


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Ormond Beach, Florida
    Posts
    26,189

    Default Re: Footing Compromised

    Here are two more (the first one is the better one, I think):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0kP5ZNRaLA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jgdC4mEvYo

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

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