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  1. #66
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Garrity View Post
    4ft level?
    A 4 foot level is great for showing a bulging foundation wall or settled foundation. It stays in my truck in its case unless I need it.

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  2. #67
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McKay View Post
    Boy do inspectors love there tools, most of them are just gimics to make you look like you know what you are doing. Less is best! I recommend using tools which suit your needs, develop your own style and don't get to complicated you will scare the hell out of the real estate agent and never see them again. Do carry a portable hand held screw driver it really saves time looking in the panel box. Also don't forget to have a "T-Bar" wrench in the trunk of your car it will make you a hero when the agent fails to have the water turned on at the street. Don't ever use a golf ball or marble to check if a floor is level, you can use your flash light to do that. Rolling a marble or golf ball on the floor is just dumb looking. Sticking any thing in the electrical panel box is just looking for trouble once you light up one of them you will never do it again. Be careful with your tools.
    I must say that basically everything you said is ... really screwed up!

    First you advise HIs not to do a better job by using the tools needed, THEN you tell them to violate all kinds of laws and ordinances, and common sense, by telling them to turn the water on when the water is turned off at the meter!

    Holy crapola!

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  3. #68
    Eric Russell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Jerry,

    I was wondering when someone was gonna chime in on the water being turned off. No gas, no electric, no water...no inspection. I'll come back when the utes are on, but there is a charge for that also. That's the realtor's responsible...on both sides.

    Also, does anyone use one of the telescoping ladders? I was thinking about getting one for those tight attic accesses in those narrow little closets that the LG can't fit into.


  4. #69
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I have two ladders, a five-foot stepladder and a 12 1/2 foot Telesteps. Each has its purpose, and I usually start with the 5-footer if the ceilings are on the lower side. It also serves as a platform to open the hatch and push the cover aside. I have used the Telesteps to push open the hatch, but it can sometimes result in marking painted surfaces. We did a condo the other day with the hatch in a smallish closet with closet organization stuff on all walls--and the ceiling was high enough to keep me from using the stepladder. So, I took the Telesteps ladder up to the second floor as well. It did the job--actually, I really like it for its simplicity, light weight, and compact size when collapsed--always impresses whoever sees me use it.

    Moral of the story: There will always be some applications that require specialized tools.

    Regards,
    Jack


  5. #70
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Jeffrey Home Inspection

    Also see post 13
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...ur-ladder.html

    I think I would be staying away from telescopic ladders.


  6. #71
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    The best tool.Good communication with the client.
    TM: Nope. The best tool is your brain. Feel around up between your ears. It's in there somewhere.

    we tend to play with our tools too much which leads to ignoring the client and sometimes missing the obvious.
    TM: You are, of course, speaking for yourself when you mention that you play around with your tools too much, right? Which one in particular, as if I had to ask?


  7. #72
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    Exclamation product liability

    I am truly sorry for Mr. Jeffery's injuries but.........

    This is not a courtroom and we don't have all the facts. Has this case been litigated? Was there operator error? What exactly was the failure? I have a Telesteps that is about 15 yrs old. The locking tabs stick sometimes but I read the instructions and know I cannot use the ladder unless ALL those tabs under the rungs pop out. I also use it knowing at 235 lbs, I'm violating the Type II rating just by using it without tools or change in my pockets. I am careful to observe the OSHA guidelines for 4:1 aspect/ ratio when I set it up but, as most of you, I don't observe the 3 feet above the upper contact point most of the time when I use it, esp. in attic hatches. I use it at my own risk with knowledge of its limitations and my responsibility for use.

    As for the accident, Mr. Jeffery stated he was 'lucky' that the bystander Realtor took him to the local Canadian MASH 4077. He was diagnosed with a C-2, C-3 compression fracture of the spine and an open Fx of the wrist. Folks, this is WHY you call 911 here in the States and let trained paramedics stabilize and immobilize you then transport you to a definitive care facility so there is not further injury and you get there alive. NEVER, try to move or transport anyone involved in a fall, is knocked unconscious, has obvious fractures, etc. Call EMS and let the pros do it.

    As for the superiority of rigid ladders, just understand ladder litigation and falls are consistently one of the most common workplace injuries according to OSHA. They are not bullet proof. Despite the warnings to ensure a firm footing, an Amish farmer erected his rigid ladder on a frozen manure pile.........and the sun came out that day. He got $75K because the warnings on the ladder did not mention frozen ground thawing as a hazard. There has to be some level of responsibility with the operator. Maybe Mr. Jeffery did everything right and this product failed him. We won't know until it has been litigated and that is where any discussion of his case belongs---in court. By posting his blog, he is endangering his case. Wait for the facts but in the meantime, read, understand and follow all the instructions that come with any product then apply any applicable codes, standards, workplace rules but most of all use common sense. Most falls are caused by a lack of that last one. If you climb, you will violate that last one sooner or later. We all do it but at our own risk.

    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  8. #73
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    Exclamation FD attic ladders

    Untitled Page

    Check out the folding attic ladder, too. I've used these many times back when I was a vol. fire fighter (folder type) but this narrow extension ladder is relatively new. Very expensive but ask Mr. Jeffery how expensive and painful his injuries are. Perhaps a telescopic ladder is not the best choice for everyone.

    You can get these ladders through fire dept. supply houses. Yes, they are heavy but they are built for the fire service.

    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  9. #74
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McKay View Post
    I recommend using tools which suit your needs, develop your own style and don't get to complicated you will scare the hell out of the real estate agent and never see them again. Do carry a portable hand held screw driver it really saves time looking in the panel box. Also don't forget to have a "T-Bar" wrench in the trunk of your car it will make you a hero when the agent fails to have the water turned on at the street.
    Why are you worried about scaring the real estate agents? I know some good agents but never seeing some of them again wouldn't be a bad thing.

    Turn water on at the street level??? Egad man!!!!


  10. #75
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Bob

    Those are the facts as I know them.This is not a courtroom and I did not suggest otherwise. Mr. Bryce frequents this forum and I am sure he would comment further on your post.

    The information was posted so others be made aware of the hazards in use of ladders whether through improper use and/or design faults. Please do not shoot the messenger.


  11. #76
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by jackt0402 View Post
    I have used the Telesteps to push open the hatch, but it can sometimes result in marking painted surfaces.
    The Xtend-n-climb is a better, sturdier ladder and can be had with a protective cap that doesn't mark walls. See Bryce Jeffrey's website. His ladder is an Xtend-n-climb clone, I think.
    I've been struggling with my Telesteps and the black mark syndrome for a couple of years, draping my garbage bag over the top etc. Finally taped the corners with white electrical tape, hey, it's fixed!

    I never use mine outside, it's too wimpy for hard climbing. Well, almost never. Here's a pic from the roof of the fifth floor. My Jaws was too dirty for the lobby and the elevator.

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  12. #77
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    Cool Re: Inspection tools

    Raymond, I didn't mean to offend you but I do ask you consider this: When we, me included, post information about a possible product defect/ injury, it is the responsibility of the poster to check his facts. If the jury is not in, figuratively or literally, then either refrain from making the post altogether or at least mention it is still being litigated and that readers should dig further before forming an opinion. As with the case in point, your seemingly innocent act could result in lost sales and lost jobs for everyone involved in this product category. Now, what if it turns out there was nothing found wrong with the product but misuse or a misapplication of use? Just because you got it straight from the plaintiff does not make it fact or credible.

    Did you check the CPSC to see if there were reports of similar product failures? Were they just with this brand, which is made in China btw, or other brands, too? I'm just reminding us all to be careful what we pass off before become alarmists. Caution is good. Product assassination without facts is not.

    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  13. #78
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Bob

    You have become repetitive.

    I suggest before you speculate in the same manner you accused me of doing you brush up on your reading. There have been a number of collapse

    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...telesteps.html

    Short of mislabeling the product and using the generic name telesteps that is all I am guilty of.

    You have no knowledge of the Canadian legal system any more than you do about the medical procedures and why they may have been done in the manner they were.

    Jerry Peck summed it up nicely with this post. Worth a read.

    Had it with Telesteps

    Those photo need to be permanently linked to a post regarding warnings to ALL HOME INSPECTOR who insist on using those telescoping ladders, insisting the ladders are safe because they ... have not fallen YET.

    Those photos should be a wake up call guys. If you are using a telescoping ladder as your inspection ladder, do not say you have not been adequately warned.

    You've been warned before by many of us, but that post and those photos --- you have now been ADEQUATELY WARNED!

    That means, could mean, if you continue using those telescoping ladders, those ladder companies may be able to use that AGAINST YOU should you fall and sue them.

    Like putting warnings on packs of cigarettes which says 'THESE CAN KILL YOU IF SMOKED', you lose your ability to sue to a large extent, because, unlike those cigarettes, those ladders are not additive.

    Your individual choice, of course.
    __________________
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  14. #79
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I bought a Telesteps and used it maybe two times and considered it unsafe to use for home inspections - way to scary to use when you are used to using a good, stable, strong Little Giant.

    I relegated that Telesteps to use with our motor home, and I still find it not practical to use with a great sense of security, so it has seldom been used.

    I'm going to guess that I have used my Telesteps a total of 10 times maximum in however many years I've had it, which is probably 5 years give or take - it is not, in my opinion, a ladder home inspectors should be using ... plain and simple.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
    Construction Litigation Consultants, LLC ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
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  15. #80
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Woh! You guys are brutal diden't think I said any thing that would deserve the wrath of the Peck gang. After all we are only responding to a new guys request for information on inspection tools. Thoes who have miss placed opinions I can only hope will succeed in this business we have enough wise asses to go around you only have to look at the HI's reputation likened to used car salesmen at best. As far as the comments about turning on the water at the street if you are afraid to do that simply by homeowner means you beter think twice about acessing the electrical panel box or turning on a dishwasher, find another job if this one scares you. Take some chances service your client as well as the Realtors who send you most of your business. It is a shame you kiss their ass during the inspection but afterwards call them names; it is common information they know the least about the product they sell; why do you think there is a need for home inspectors? If you find the water turned off and are hesitant to open a water valve a homeowner would open to complete your inspection you are missing the oportunity to get a pay check and providing a dis-service to your client and the Realtor. I would never recommend turning on any system which was shut down by the city, gas co. or electric co. But my standard do approve the use of normal homeowner controls - ASHI. I think there has been enough said on this thread!


  16. #81
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McKay View Post
    As far as the comments about turning on the water at the street if you are afraid to do that simply by homeowner means

    Thomas,

    You really are off your rocker, aren't you?

    Using a special water meter wrench is "homeowner means"?

    That must be why utilities fine you $500 for turning the water on at the meter when they turn it off - because it is "homeowner means"???

    Just in case you were not aware of it, there is a water shut off valve AFTER the water meter valve AND BEFORE the house system, and THAT valve does not require a special tool and THAT valve is the "homeowner means".

    It is home inspectors who do as you are saying, along with ones like SVH, TM, and others who give this profession a bad name and equate HIs with used car salesmen.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  17. #82
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Speak for your self Jerry! I refer to the Florida Department of Insurance meetings to delierate home inspection licensing and the band of jerks in shorts and tee shirts who showed up and embarised them selves in fornt of the professionals who were there to try to help them; look it up in the article in the Feburary 2010 issue of the ASHI Mag. "There Aint No Sunshine in Florida". Additionally it has been my exprience that when the city turns off the water they put a lock on it, perhaps you have never seen that?


  18. #83
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas McKay View Post
    Additionally it has been my exprience that when the city turns off the water they put a lock on it, perhaps you have never seen that?

    Sometimes, yes.

    MOST of the time, no. (At least in past times, in these economic times, they may have changed that practice, however, I do KNOW of places where the water meter shut offs are OLD and have NO provisions for being able to be locked off.

    Jerry Peck, Construction / Litigation Consultant
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  19. #84
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I'll turn on the valves at the meter if I need to. I'd never turn on the supply disconnect on the street. They're 10 feet underground and covered with 5 feet of snow this time of year

    Most of the foreclosed houses here are winterized and the meters have been removed. I don't carry tools to reconnect them. Plus, our insurance won't cover installing water meters or turning on the utility supply valve.

    I've looked at the telescopic ladders and figured if I can't trust my camera tripod to stay up I sure wouldn't trust a ladder with only two legs.

    MinnesotaHomeInspectors.com
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  20. #85
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I wouldn't leave for an inspection without my 12.5' Xtend n Climb telescopic ladder. I can sometimes go a full week without having to pull my 32' extension ladder off the car. In 6+ years of use, it has never failed me, unexpectedly compressed, or buckled. Now that said, I'm not a big guy and will never approach the 225 lb weight limit of the ladder in my life. Are the injuries incurred by other users of telescopic ladders the fault of the equipment or user error? I don't know. The ladder does have some flex as does my extension ladder depending upon the I set it up at. But as long as you don't try anything stupid with it, I have no reason from my experience to believe it is not a safe and reliable ladder.


  21. #86
    Eric Russell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    My city...and surrounding area...doesn't use locks on the water meter. The new code here is to install a homeowner valve after the meter. They DON'T want you turning something on that they've turned off. Logic says there is a reason for it to be off or it would be on. Realtors are good folks, but they've got a relatively easy job in comparison to ours...as far as the physical work goes. They do spend many hours driving clients around and doing paper work and such, but it is their responsibility to make sure they utes are on. I'm simply staying out of their territory. Plus, ever hear of a "hold harmless" agreement? You don't have one, and the house floods...guess what you be paying for??? Same as for gas et al. I set the appt. I call the realtor and make sure the utes get turned on. If they're not, I call them on it. Very simple. My atty. advises this is the safest way to avoid any liability. Am I scared??? No, just cautious and careful. I am a full-time firefighter also, and I tend to err on the side of safety...whose safety??? Mine.


  22. #87
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Just a comment about using the Street Key to turn the water off at the curb---from personal experience I wouldn't do it. I had a home that was about 74 years old--3/4" copper to the street. Wanted to change the main shutoff valve, so I called the water department to shut it down for about 15 minutes while I swapped valves.

    The showed up in a small pickup, took out the key and tried to shut the valve. In their struggles they broke the stem. From then on it became a "Flying Circus" episode in front of the house---two more trucks, a large truck with equipment, backhoe, road blocked off as they had to dig additional holes in the street to locate the main to shut the water while they replaced the street cock. So.... I wouldn't touch a street shutoff at all.


  23. #88
    A.D. Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I wouldn't leave for an inspection without my 12.5' Xtend n Climb telescopic ladder.
    NO: Hopefully, you will not find yourself someday not being able to leave your inspection because of your telescopic "ladder".


  24. #89
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    Smile being objective

    Raymond, again, I do apologize if I sounds like I'm busting on you or nagging. My aim is simply to open everyone's eyes to being objective, including my own. Have I re-thought my own use of my Telesteps? You betcha'. However, it would make a stronger case against the use of these ladders as a product class if there was a recall listed by the CPSC, which I was unable locate in a search. If anyone has info. regarding CPSC again against these products, I would appreciate them sharing it with us. If you have knowledge of product defects that affect the safe operation or use, you actually have a duty to advise the CPSC of the problem. That is the best way you can become part of a solution. It is good to raise awareness among a few hundred or thousand home inspectors and visitors to this site who might read this one thread. However, the CPSC reaches much farther. If a product is indeed inherently unsafe at any speed, they have the power to force either a product re-design or have it pulled off the market. I have direct personal experience working with the CPSC on several product recalls so I know a little about the process from a mfr.s perspective. That brings up another good point: how many of you that have experienced product failures have reported it to the mfr.? If you are Toyota and your accelerator pedals are sticking, wouldn't you want someone to tell you? Now, if the mfr was told and failed to investigate or respond that puts a huge liability on them, trust me. That can result in criminal charges so most mfrs *get it* and will respond once notified of a problem. The big question then becomes their response to the issue.

    To revisit my case: I inspect each locking tab religiously before I erect the ladder. Yes, sometimes a tab or two sticks and I have to pop it out. That is my due diligence. It also means the mfr. needs to go back to the drawing board and improve their design because I should not have to monkey with the ladder at each use. Yes, I have reported it to them (not the CPSC).

    The problem with ladders is they are a contradiction unto themselves. We want one light as a feather but strong enough to hold an ox and utterly reliable at ultra low cost. That just doesn't exist. We will gladly opt for the cheaper option in lieu of safety every time. To me, fire dept. ladders are the Gold Std. Yet how many of us are willing to spend that kind of money and lug that kind of weigh around daily? We are all hypocrites to some degree when it comes to ladders.

    FYI, I have an old magnesium extension ladder given to me by my father in law. They quit making them because of cost and brittleness of the material. They are very strong and very light--right up to the point they fail.....:-)

    I think this discussion is very healthy. How about any other tools HI's use--any other problems? Anyone have a DMM blow up in your hands for ex.?

    Bob

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  25. #90
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    Talking size vs. ladders

    [QUOTE=Nick Ostrowski;121874] Now that said, I'm not a big guy and will never approach the 225 lb weight limit of the ladder in my life. QUOTE]

    LOL. FYI, those who have never met Nick, he is about 1/2 my size! Nice guy in a compact package. Now, John Arnold is a little taller but not as chunky as me. ;-)

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  26. #91
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    Default Re: being objective

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Harper View Post
    FYI, I have an old magnesium extension ladder given to me by my father in law. They quit making them because of cost and brittleness of the material. They are very strong and very light--right up to the point they fail.....:-)

    Bob
    Bob, I'm assuming you've seen magnesium burn. I recall my brother pocketed some in high school from the chemistry lab and brought it home to play with because we were pyros. I've never seen anything burn as bright as that stuff.

    Last edited by Nick Ostrowski; 02-24-2010 at 08:07 AM.

  27. #92
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    Exclamation mag type D fires

    Mag. burning? Oh, yes! As a retired vol. firefighter, we used to see Volkswagen Beetle engines lighting up the night sky. It was fun to watch a rooky try to extinguish it with a hose stream! Man, what fireworks as molten mag. splattered everywhere! Then we'd let them try to extinguish it by dumping sand no it. Made a nice glass dome but the fire still burned. Then we'd let them try a a Purple K dry chemical extinguisher and even that wouldn't do it. Finally, they'd realize all you can do is contain it and let it burn out without extending the fire to the woods.

    FYI, the Air Force uses mag. in their "basketball" flares and night photo recon. flashes at 1 million candle power.

    Alum., zirconium and other metals will burn, too. Alum. makes the space shuttle rocket booster motors. Metal dust explosions are really impressive---and powerful.

    Keep the fire in the fireplace.

  28. #93
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    "Mag. burning? Oh, yes! As a retired vol. firefighter, we used to see Volkswagen Beetle engines lighting up the night sky."

    What?
    VW engines made of magnesium?
    When?

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  29. #94
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    You seem to be correct
    I did not know that.


    http://www.autofieldguide.com/articles/090304.html
    The VW Beetle and the VW Super Beetle both had magnesium engine blocks (AS21 and AS41, respectively).

    ' correct a wise man and you gain a friend... correct a fool and he'll bloody your nose'.

  30. #95
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Rick,

    The original VW bugs had magnesium engine cases. You could actually get an explosion if you hit it right with a 1.5" hose. We had a fire chief with access to an airplane part manufacturer who used to give us bins of magnesium shavings. Those drills were always well attended and frequently we have another 50 people show up just to watch. It would usually take a day or two for my retina's to recover.

    I use an Xtend N Climb and have a lot of respect for it. I always take a second to review the angle, the surface the ladders on and locks before I jump on. In the 3 years I have had it I have had one unintentional section collapse and on occasional I have gone on it with only one of the two locks secured. Both times it was because I was talking and not checking before climbing. From a safety perspective I see this the same as backing out of a parking spot. If you don't check its likely your going to back into someone. Its not a question of if, its when. Ditto for ladders, if you don't follow good procedures you will take a fall....

    //Rick

    Rick Bunzel
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  31. #96
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I do carry a tool to shut off water and gas mains, but would never use it to turn anything on. I only keep it around in the slight chance there is a gas or water leak and there isn't a valve between the main and the leak or the valve is malfunctioning. I know you can always call the utility company in an emergency and they'll (normally) show up quick to shut things off, but the quicker the better.
    Only cost $10 at Home Depot and marketed for use after a disaster to turn off utilities in the event of an emergency.
    On a side note, it does have a nifty end on it used to unscrew water main access caps. Comes in handy now and again.


  32. #97
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    IF the housing market (and our economy) ever recovers I am going to charge additional fees for using my extensive inventory of tools and instruments to discover defects and deficiencies that are not discoverable during a standard inspection.

    I am using these now and not charging for them and 98% of clients (Americans) are too cheap to extend a gratuity.


  33. #98
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    Default Re: Inspection tools

    TELESTEPS:

    Lots of imitations of Swedish telesteps. Lots of stupid inspectors refering to their cheap imitations as telesteps.

    It would take a good deal of time to explain the whole story re telescoping ladders. (use them with care--I do.)

    I was chosen to be an evaluator of the product that the American licnesee was allowed to produce. They were a failure. (Home Depot pulled them)

    The photo that Raymond Wand showed that showcased a litigant showed photos of yet another manufacturer of the steps. They also retailed at Home Depot at a later date for $189 and were made in China. I found them to be very poor. ( Wobbly sections and just A PIECE OF CRAP )

    Actually, once the Swede's patent protections expired a lot of internationaly based companies commenced producing poor copies.

    There was a defect with the original Swedish product, which I discovered as an evaluator for the American licensee and the Swedes corrected it after the American licensee stopped production. (I possess the corrected version).

    Lots of misinformation about telesteps. I know the whole and true story.

    Last edited by Ken Bates; 03-05-2010 at 01:29 PM. Reason: typos and harsh & uncharitable comments

  34. #99
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario
    Posts
    5,005

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    So whats the rest of the story?


  35. #100
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southern Vancouver Island
    Posts
    4,546

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bates View Post
    TELESTEPS:

    I was chosen to be an evaluator of the product that the American licnesee was allowed to produce. They were a failure. (Home Depot pulled them)

    Actually, once the Swede's patent protections expired a lot of internationaly based companies commenced producing poor copies.

    There was a defect with the original Swedish product,stopped production. (I possess the corrected version).

    I know the whole and true story.
    So fill us in, and don't be rude.

    You could be saving somebody from serious injury here. Which are the defective ladders?


  36. #101
    Bill Henneberg's Avatar
    Bill Henneberg Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ken Bates
    TELESTEPS:

    I was chosen to be an evaluator of the product that the American licnesee was allowed to produce. They were a failure. (Home Depot pulled them)

    Actually, once the Swede's patent protections expired a lot of internationaly based companies commenced producing poor copies.

    There was a defect with the original Swedish product,stopped production. (I possess the corrected version).

    I know the whole and true story.





    Quote Originally Posted by John Kogel View Post
    So fill us in, and don't be rude.

    You could be saving somebody from serious injury here. Which are the defective ladders?
    I have a 326 from 2003. I presume it is one of the suspect ones. Is there anything you can tell me that will make me safer?

    Which of the later ones are the improved, and presumably safer ones? 1205? 1600?

    .


  37. #102
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,797

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I'm nearly as concerned about my Xtend & Climb collapsing as I'm worried because the feet do not provide a decent grip on surfaces such as hardwood floors.

    Michael Thomas
    Paragon Property Services Inc., Chicago IL
    http://paragoninspects.com

  38. #103
    Bill Henneberg's Avatar
    Bill Henneberg Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Bates View Post
    TELESTEPS:


    There was a defect with the original Swedish product, which I discovered as an evaluator for the American licensee and the Swedes corrected it after the American licensee stopped production. (I possess the corrected version).

    Lots of misinformation about telesteps. I know the whole and true story.
    So, Ken, is my 326 the unsafe or safe version?

    Any tips on safe usage? So far, so good, but your post has shaken my confidence.

    Last edited by Bill Henneberg; 07-17-2010 at 09:06 PM. Reason: speling

  39. #104
    Robert Welch's Avatar
    Robert Welch Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I had everything but the tongue depressors, do they sell them a Wal-Greens?

    Robert

    Houston Home Inspection - Houston Home Inspectors - Robert Welch

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    Flat head screw driver with assortment of heads
    flashlight
    adjustable wrench - small
    torpedo level
    moisture meter
    12 volt spot light
    ladder
    safety glasses
    wooden tongue depressor
    pens/markers
    band-aids
    small binoculars
    thermometer
    biz cards
    compass
    marble or ball bearing
    white out
    extra pair of shoes to wear inside house
    voltage sniffer
    outlet tester w/ gfci test button
    digital camera
    tape measure



  40. #105
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tyler, TX
    Posts
    719

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I purchased an Xtend and Climb back in June. I've read many posts on these forums both pro and con (probably more against).

    There have been many times where I wished I had one and I finally found 2 (Ace Hdwe, in Wimberly, TX while on my 24th wedding anniversary trip). They were covered in dust and I asked what he'd take for one of them (the other is probably still there).

    It is so handy. I make sure that each lock is firmly set and I put pressure on each step before climbing. So far so good. It is actually good to have a healthy fear of your ladder so that you dont' get too lax in your daily operations.

    Bruce Thompson, Lic. #9199
    www.TylerHomeInspector.com
    Home Inspections in the Tyler and East Texas area

  41. #106
    Kris Ericsen's Avatar
    Kris Ericsen Guest

    Wink Re: Inspection tools

    I preffer a hands free inspection approach. Most of my gear is in a heavy duty modified Surveyers vest, with a full rear pocket accessible from either side for my clip board, building plans or other large items. I use my own proprietary generic/schematic drawing sheets for homes & condos that I can mark up quickly.

    I've standardized my gear around AA rechargibles with a Nikon Coolpix from Sams club and 2x & 3x AA flashlights. A UE CO detector, Deltatrack laser Thermotrace and Pin style Pro moisture meter and the rest of my gear all fit in the vest. Duluth Trading in Wisconsin has excellent outdoor work clothing and other gear. Their $200 Arctic Parka with Fur rough is a steal. I wear their Fire Hose IKE jacket all year except summer.

    After having several multi-bit screwdrivers fall apart on me; I found the IRWIN protouch grip driver which is non racheting with a solid handle. The bit shafts provide 1/4, 5/16 & 3/8 sockets for Furnace Panel bolts. Slipped into the shafts are two each, philips, slotted and square drive bits. This is an industrial strength tool not found at Hardware checkouts and you can't loose anything.

    I am wary of telescoping ladders just because there are so many potential failure points with all the engagement and extension components. So I use my old 6' fiberglass wall banger inside; and a multi-fold aluminum, for most outside work. The uncoated aluminum makes your hands black; so the roof comes last. I keep hand cleaners in the truck. Usually these days I can get a picture of the property in advance to warn if I need to bring extension ladders. As a Side note on attic hatches; I once put too much pressure on a womens closet shelf bracket that collapsed with 20 feet of packed clothing that had to come out while I replaced all the shelf brackets and re stowed the clothes just in time before she came home. Whew! that was a close one.

    After having to fix several damaged Garage doors over the years; I don't do a Auto reverse pressure test anymore. I found that I can't predict when a door operator bracket will tear off and/or a Panel bend or fold.

    I drive an 06 Tundra 4x with the jump seat taken out. A Weekender demountable ladder rack in the truck bed hold the extension ladders when needed. I can get 19 to 20 mpg if I'd just keep my foot out of it. I'll always need a pickup here in Alaska for other chores.

    An Auto-exec fiberglass seat desk on the passenger side holds my laptop and has a slide out desk extension. The new ones have a built-in inverter. I run a regular HP 960? printer in the back, set on a plastic drawer set for other stuff. These old printers are very rugged and have held up in years of rough mountain roads. I have an expensive old smart level and use it as a torpedo with 2' & 6' frames in the truck. I've got a laser torpedo also.

    I use an HP Computor from Sams and a Brother Color Laser Multi-Function machine at the office. These were about $600 a couple years ago but the damn cartridges are expensive. With the Brother I can just dump whatever I want into the topfeed hopper and scan to Fax or Email.

    I'm still stuck with my old ITA program, which means I write the report three times. Once on the Photos, again on the sections, and the summary in Word since the ITA word processing is so crappy. A Homegauge demo looks promising as a replacement but it's hard to teach us old dogs new tricks. I use Quickbooks to generate invoices. If anyone out there has switched to Home gauge recently; I'd like to hear how it went for you.

    Later Guys, and don't forget to play nice.

    Kris Ericsen
    Alaska Building Inspections


  42. #107
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Bob, nice post on telesteps. I'll support your first post.

    Great ladder. Need to be very careful, make sure all locks fully engage. Like many tools, an operator in a hurry can easily get into trouble. This ladder is a requires a bit better mechanical skills than a basic ladder and should be approached more like one would approach using a power tool.


  43. #108
    Lisa Simkins's Avatar
    Lisa Simkins Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    I include a pen/laser pointer, which is great for pointing things out to clients. Also screw drivers that are electrically insulated for the elec. panel. In case it has been improperly screwed in, ie a long screw going through a wire. I have been told it has happened. My indoor shoes are electrically insulated safety shoes. I only use them indoors in home inspections.


  44. #109
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, FL
    Posts
    180

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Lisa, always place the back of your hand on the electrical panel box prior to removing the cover if its hot or warm to the touch don't open; if you get a shock thank the good Lord you touched it with the back of your hand, your hand would contract and move away from the hot box if you touched it with the front you might be pushing up daisies. Every inspector with any track record wears rubber sole shoes. Always inspect the electrical panel box first its when you are the freshest and not libel to take anything for granted. Stay safe, the alternatives are not good!


  45. #110
    aefieldinspectors's Avatar
    aefieldinspectors Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond Wand View Post
    Flat head screw driver with assortment of heads
    flashlight
    adjustable wrench - small
    torpedo level
    moisture meter
    12 volt spot light
    ladder
    safety glasses
    wooden tongue depressor
    pens/markers
    band-aids
    small binoculars
    thermometer
    biz cards
    compass
    marble or ball bearing
    white out
    extra pair of shoes to wear inside house
    voltage sniffer
    outlet tester w/ gfci test button
    digital camera
    tape measure
    Hello to all,
    I am new here.
    And I think this is really helps you...


  46. #111
    John Bernard's Avatar
    John Bernard Guest

    Default Re: Inspection tools

    Welcome to the profession

    Great suggestions - I also use a combustible gas detector, combination SureTest GFCI/AFCI tester, microwave detector and laser thermometer

    The more toys the better! :^)

    John


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