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  1. #1
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    Oct 2014
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    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
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    Default Camera on a stick

    How many of you use some means of photographing/looking at stuff above your height without a ladder? What do you use? Is it an adaptor that can fit into the tripod mount? How do you fire the camera, if camera it is? If not a camera, does it give you enough resolution to make out fine print? The "Similar Thread" links bring me to "illegal string" messages.

    Presently UL 217 requires smoke alarms have dates and some other info accessible without use of tools. The way I read it, you still could put the info on the back, so an inspector would have to untwist the unit and drop it. I've proposed making the info visible without the device's removal. However, if they print it on the side, an inspector still could need a ladder to bring eyes up there. Too time-consuming, unless I can read the date standing below, before I poke something up at the TEST button.

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Fletcher, NC
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    27,869

    Default Re: Camera on a stick

    Quote Originally Posted by david shapiro View Post
    Presently UL 217 requires smoke alarms have dates and some other info accessible without use of tools.
    Define "tools".

    A "ladder" is a "tool".

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
    Posts
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    Default Re: Camera on a stick

    "Tool" is not a convivial epithet. "Oh, if I only had a brain." No, wait: that's a tool too.

    Getting down to nonconductive tacks, the standard says it cannot require a tool for access. I have some tall friends, and smoke alarms need not always be installed on ceilings to comply with NFPA 72.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fletcher, NC
    Posts
    27,869

    Default Re: Camera on a stick

    Quote Originally Posted by david shapiro View Post
    "I have some tall friends, and smoke alarms need not always be installed on ceilings to comply with NFPA 72.
    I had two tall guys, they were brothers, who worked for me for about a year - one was 6'-11", his younger brother was only 6'-9" tall
    ... ladders? Who needed ladders with them? They had to bend and duck going through doorways.

    Yep, the smoke alarms are allowed to be on the walls (but still beyond my reach).

    Jerry Peck
    Construction/Litigation/Code Consultant - Retired
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Posts
    3,100

    Default Re: Camera on a stick

    Quote Originally Posted by david shapiro View Post
    How many of you use some means of photographing/looking at stuff above your height without a ladder? What do you use? Is it an adaptor that can fit into the tripod mount? How do you fire the camera, if camera it is? If not a camera, does it give you enough resolution to make out fine print? The "Similar Thread" links bring me to "illegal string" messages.
    David,

    One obvious answer is a drone. But, if you are using a drone (it doesn't matter what the weight is) for commercial purposes (i.e. home inspection), then you need to be licensed by the FAA. Plus with drones, there are restricted areas, particularly near airports, government buildings, etc. I think a decent beginner drone kit is under $700

    I know a couple of inspectors who use the "Eye-Stick" It's a 30 foot telescoping pole that has a holder for a smartphone or tablet at the bottom and a holder for a camera (one with wireless connection) at the top. The smartphone/tablet can wirelessly view what the camera sees and trigger the shutter release (archaic term, I know). I know the Nikon W300 will work and believe so will the Olympus TG. There are probably others cameras that will work as well. This is a low-tech solution, but they don't exactly give these away.
    They are also in the $700 range. Seems 'spensive for a long stick.

    I don't have either. If I inspect a home that has a roof that I cannot get on because of material, steepness, or height, I will get back as far as I can and look through binoculars.

    Quote Originally Posted by david shapiro View Post
    Presently UL 217 requires smoke alarms have dates and some other info accessible without use of tools. The way I read it, you still could put the info on the back, so an inspector would have to untwist the unit and drop it. I've proposed making the info visible without the device's removal. However, if they print it on the side, an inspector still could need a ladder to bring eyes up there. Too time-consuming, unless I can read the date standing below, before I poke something up at the TEST button.

    I recommend buyers replace all smoke alarms when they take posession of the house and to test them monthly. Testing the smoke alarm during the inspection only tells you if it worked that day. If I look at the date and see that it is 8 years old, do I recommend they replace it or tell them that they still have two more years? My opinion is that a two-pack photoelectric smoke alarm with a 10 year battery is $45. Buy some new smoke alarms when you move in. What is your life worth?


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    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

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