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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    Close the doors.

    Some of the best advice to give your clients is that when they go to bed at night - close their bedroom doors.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-cQ...ature=youtu.be


    Here is a second one I added with edit on 04-16-2012:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSP03BE74WA

    Similar Threads:
    Last edited by Jerry Peck; 04-16-2021 at 04:32 PM.
    Member Benefits1
    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    Hah. That's actually great video and great advice.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    Default Re: Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    I added a second one to my previous post.

    Thank you for bringing this back up to the forefront.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    A couple of fine details (current as of the UL/NFPA door messaging workshop in 2019):

    A pet flap is okay; the door still offers plenty of protection.

    If the only smoke alarm is in the hall outside--it should intercommunicate with one in the BR, but if there is none inside--there's an advantage to keeping the door open, at least from the perspective of the room's occupants.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Ormond Beach, Florida
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    27,578

    Default Re: Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    Two questions:

    - A pet door flap on an interior door?
    - - I suspect the reason would be to allow a pet to be able to get into the bedroom and wake a person?

    - Leave the bedroom door open if there is no smoke alarm in the bedroom?
    - - You've now got less than 3 minutes to wake up and get out. And 3 minutes includes getting to the youngest kids room and getting both/all of you out.
    - - That 3 minutes is from the videos showing how quickly the toxic smoke from modern furnishings overtakes the rooms, reducing the chances of survival due to the smoke.

    I guess there are no good options in many cases, such as those who can't afford battery powered and wirelessly interconnected smoke alarms.

    Jerry Peck
    Construction Litigation Consultant ( www.ConstructionLitigationConsultants.com )
    www.AskCodeMan.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Maryland, DC, and Northern Virginia, electrical only
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: Fire ... I didn't find a better place to post this, so ... here it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Peck View Post
    Two questions:

    - A pet door flap on an interior door?
    - - I suspect the reason would be to allow a pet to be able to get into the bedroom and wake a person?

    - Leave the bedroom door open if there is no smoke alarm in the bedroom?
    - - You've now got less than 3 minutes to wake up and get out. And 3 minutes includes getting to the youngest kids room and getting both/all of you out.
    - - That 3 minutes is from the videos showing how quickly the toxic smoke from modern furnishings overtakes the rooms, reducing the chances of survival due to the smoke.

    I guess there are no good options in many cases, such as those who can't afford battery powered and wirelessly interconnected smoke alarms.
    Right you are, Jerry.

    The pet flap? Apparently there are plenty of homeowners who keep their bedroom doors cracked to allow their pets free access.

    The three minutes, presuming modern design, meaning "foamed gasoline" padding and synthetic furnishings (not too mention engineered lumber)? Yes, and that's pretty useless if a BR occupant is disabled, or if they take sleeping pills, or booze, or are hard of hearing and the devices rely on a standard high-frequency signal rather than the 420 Hz square wave.

    If folks are not familiar with these programs, you might check out CAPABLE and SOCIABLE, which originated from Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, enlisting their OTs. You'll learn how many low-income or Naturally Occurring Retirement Community dwellers (or both) simply don't or won't update/upgrade to modern safety standards.

    Happily, many HIs deal primarily with people who do have more money, and who are prepared to make important changes. Still, some people just. move. in. Upgrading the alarms may b eon their bucket list, but until they get around to it . . . .


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