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  1. #1
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    Default What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    I've got my first manufactured home inspection scheduled in a couple of days...actually it's two of them, next to one another on separately deeded parcels of land. One is a double wide built in 1996 and the other a single wide built in 1990. Both are installed on permanent foundations, with what I'm told are new heat pumps and electrical service. I've seen a few photos and the houses looks pretty nice and well cared for.

    So what differences do I need to be aware of for these homes?

    What I can think of so far...
    1) How are these normally attached to the foundation
    2) Are requirements for placement of hot water heaters the same for site built homes?
    3) Allowable electrical panel locations?

    What else?

    Thanks

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Foster View Post
    I've got my first manufactured home inspection scheduled in a couple of days...actually it's two of them, next to one another on separately deeded parcels of land. One is a double wide built in 1996 and the other a single wide built in 1990. Both are installed on permanent foundations, with what I'm told are new heat pumps and electrical service. I've seen a few photos and the houses looks pretty nice and well cared for.

    So what differences do I need to be aware of for these homes?

    What I can think of so far...
    1) How are these normally attached to the foundation
    2) Are requirements for placement of hot water heaters the same for site built homes?
    3) Allowable electrical panel locations?

    What else?

    Thanks
    Robert,

    I suggest doing a search for similar posts. This has been addressed a few times. After which, come on back and go for specifics.

    Try these for a start.

    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...ene-homes.html
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...spections.html
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...bile-home.html
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...ble-homes.html
    http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_i...uble-wide.html

    Department of Redundancy Department
    http://www.FullCircleInspect.com/

  3. #3
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    It they are truly manufactured homes they will be on block piers and the brick foundation will not be structural. Some of the codes require the block piers to be mortared together or covered in Shurwall and some codes allow them to be dry stacked. It depends on where you are.

    The attic will not be accessible and the floor insulation, ductwork, wiring, and plumbing will not be visible due to the cover on the bottom of the chassis.

    Be sure and find the manufactures label and make sure the home was inspected by an agency that is licensed to inspect in your state. A home that is made in NC may not be able to be installed in SC if the inspection agency is not licensed in SC.

    Example: I worked for a company that bought 35 double wides that were made in GA. The company was not using an inspection agency that was approved by NC. In the end we had to take down the paneling and remove the ceiling tiles so they could be inspected by the local inspectors just like a new construction would be.

    That is a start....hope it helps...


  4. #4
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Watch out for the big 'water balloons' underneath. Several times I've found a HUGE bulge in the skirting beneath a bathroom filled with your worst nightmare. Like the others mentioned, you can't see the actual plumbing and other mechanics... but you can be pretty sure there's a problem at times. If you see one, resist the temptation to break it open


  5. #5
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    Smile Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Things to look for or to be aware of:

    *Polybutylene water supply pipes, if you find them advise client on the problems and concern related to them. Less problems were found with copper crimp ring connections.

    *Commonly exposed Romex is used and must be allowed? for water heater power supply.

    *If it has concrete block piers check wood shims to make sure they are tight and secure. I commonly find them to be loose in areas.

    *Be sure not to call out the loose wiring from transportation lighting that is usually found on crawlspace ground.

    *Make sure plumbing vents terminate at least six inches above roof surface. Commonly they are to short.

    *If it's a double wide make sure the center of floor is even. Commonly there is a slight ridge or bump in the center of floor from section(s) settling.

    *Most of the stock heating systems are cheaper units. I commonly find AC condensation drains routed to drain into crawlspace. Also water heater TPR drains routed to crawlspace.

    *Commonly I find damaged ductwork or low air flow at register vent(s).

    *Be sure to check for sloping floors.

    *Commonly I find that the perimeter block foundations are more of a permanent skirting than a structural foundation. The steel frame and support piers are the primary support.

    * Be sure to determine if "tie-downs" AKA "hurricane strapping" is installed in crawlspace. These properly secure the metal frame to the ground.

    I'm no mobile home expert, but I hope this helps.


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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    OK, about the only thing I can add to that above is the fun search for the water heater.
    It will often be behind a wood panel in a closet. Sometimes there's a panel outside roughly the shape of a water tank. The electrical supply cable is never in conduit. Sometimes you'll find Aluminum wiring to save weight. Walls are thinner, so electrical box fill is a problem, but not likely to be visible.

    Metal roofs need seams resealed every year. Membrane or shingled roofs are a bit better. There are often no eaves, just a gutter smuck on the side of the wall, or on the older units, no gutters at all.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
    www.allsafehome.ca

  7. #7
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Thanks for all the replies....I've been reading the links and references mentioned....sounds like this is going to be an experience....47 years on this earth, 31 of those in the building industry and I've only been in a manufactured home once in all that time. I'm looking forward to Saturday's inspections...keep the tips coming... two more days to learn all I can.


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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Fellman View Post
    Watch out for the big 'water balloons' underneath. If you see one, resist the temptation to break it open
    The pics are blurry, so maybe my hand was shaking, maybe I was imagining the contents of this big water bag.

    That other unit was a '68, still mobile! Cans for gas money!

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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    There are specific requirements by HUD for heating/combustion appliances. Fireplaces must have glass doors, freestanding appliances must be listed for installation in a mobile home and bolted to the floor. Outside air supplies are required. They are specific about the need for screening at the termination of the intake. That information is found in the Code of Federal Regulations.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Another thing is to make sure that the front porch or deck to the home is capable of supporting 6-8 hound dogs. Wouldn't want it to collapse and land on any chickens or small children playing under the trailer.


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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Hurst View Post
    Another thing is to make sure that the front porch or deck to the home is capable of supporting 6-8 hound dogs. Wouldn't want it to collapse and land on any chickens or small children playing under the trailer.
    .
    Around Here they Sleep Under The Porch.
    * chickens are in the Yard.
    ** small chill-drens is on Momma's Apron Strings.
    .

    It Might have Choked Artie But it ain't gone'a choke Stymie! Our Gang " The Pooch " (1932)
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Did those two inspections today.

    Boy...you guys weren't kidding about the roof on these things....can you say springy and spongy feeling....wow...I can see how easily it would be to take the quick route into the living room.

    I've got three specific questions....two plumbing, one electrical...that I need a little help with.

    1)The secret water heater space takes a little detective work and removing clothes out of the closests to find. Neither house had a drain pan under the water heater and one of them was leaking. I assume calling out the absence of a drain pan as a defect that needs correction is the same in a manufacturered home as it would be in a site built?..correct? It seems to me it would be more pertinent because the occupants can't even see the water heater.

    2) TPRV piping. Obviously when the water heater is hidden behind a wall panel the whole idea of conspicuous discharge of the TPRV doesn't make much sense. Both TPRV's were plumbed straight through the floor although I could never find them in the crawl. What's the acceptable practice regarding this issue?

    3)Grounding. The distribution panels in both houses were supplied correctly with a four conductor feed from the main panel out in the yard and the EGC's and neutrals were isolated in the distribution panels, but I could not locate a GEC in either distribution panel or a grounding electrode under either unit. I can't seem to locate this in the IRC and my abbreviated Code Checks don't cover it. Can someone educate me on this...seems to me given the distance back to the grounding electrode at the main panel and the steel super structure these manufactured homes are built on a GES right under the house grounding the distribution panel and steel structure would be called for. The only thought I have here is that maybe the hurricane straps are considered suitable ground for the structure ?

    Thanks for the help.

    Last edited by Robert Foster; 05-08-2010 at 03:00 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Numbers 1 & 2 were inspected and passed at the factory so there is not much you can say about those items except mention to the buyers that while they meet the manufactured home code they do not meet the local codes. In my opinion they would not be a repair item ....they would be an improvement.

    Number 3 - There should be a #4 bare copper wire run from the ground bar in the house panel to the steel chassis of the home. If it is a double wide there will be a #4 jumper that bonds the two halves together.

    The only grounding electrode required is a driven ground rod at the service and a #6 GEC if it is protected. A #4 is required if it is exposed. The four wire feeder takes care of the rest.

    Ok...I'm ducking for cover!


  14. #14
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    I agree with the grounding issue. There is not typically a ground rod for the trailer. Grounding is provided by the fourth wire from the main breaker panel.

    TPR valves are required to discharge out thru the floor, that is how it's done. This provides some drinking water for the rodents in the crawl.

    Please direct all comments towards James above. He went thataway.

    John Kogel, RHI, BC HI Lic #47455
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Thanks for the replies....greatly appreciate all the info.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    I just saw this post and you have probably already completed the inspection, but one important note regarding manufactured homes (for your client). All/most mortgage companies that are backed by the federal government (which appears to be most mortgage companies today) and a majority of other mortgage firms require a foundation certificate for manufactured homes. this foundation certificate is signed/sealed by a Licensed PE and basically states the foundation meets HUD guide lines (or meets the intent on existing foundations/homes). I work with a firm that supplies a lot of these certificates, but I do not and can not sign off on a manufactured home (a Lic. PE must approve or make recommendations as to the foundation).

    Jamie R Wilks
    Virginia Certified Home Inspector

  17. #17
    Leigh Goodman's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    All attachments (porch, deck, roof over) must be self supporting. No weight hung on the perimeter walls.


  18. #18
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Had one a few weeks back, the agent called me and said the Bank needed to have the foundation system certified, even though I took photos of the piers, runners, tiedowns, etc and included them with my client's report. So, the agent emails me a few days later and asks if I have any interest in becoming a structural engineer, then proceeds to tell me that this elderly couple in their seventies show up at the property to certify the foundation system and Grannie puts on the ol' kneepads and goes into the crawlspace and takes a few photos and comes out 5 minutes later while Gramps wandered around the outside perimeter with his hands in his pockets, gave them a bill for $325 and a one page description with their findings that had a fancy little notary stamp with Gramps SE license number and initials on it and drove off.... My description was way more thorough and I had more photos, but I don't have that fancy little stamp. Regardless, the bank was satisfied and the deal closed. I wonder how some people sleep at night or look at themselves in a mirror.


  19. #19
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hintz View Post
    Had one a few weeks back, the agent called me and said the Bank needed to have the foundation system certified, even though I took photos of the piers, runners, tiedowns, etc and included them with my client's report. So, the agent emails me a few days later and asks if I have any interest in becoming a structural engineer, then proceeds to tell me that this elderly couple in their seventies show up at the property to certify the foundation system and Grannie puts on the ol' kneepads and goes into the crawlspace and takes a few photos and comes out 5 minutes later while Gramps wandered around the outside perimeter with his hands in his pockets, gave them a bill for $325 and a one page description with their findings that had a fancy little notary stamp with Gramps SE license number and initials on it and drove off.... My description was way more thorough and I had more photos, but I don't have that fancy little stamp. Regardless, the bank was satisfied and the deal closed. I wonder how some people sleep at night or look at themselves in a mirror.
    Interesting but the facts remain that Gramps has the training. Sounds like he agreed with you, the foundation was OK. The difference is, he's smart enough to have acquired the stamp, and he's got Granny to do the bull work.

    That reminds me:
    What's the difference between a rocket scientist and a simpleton?
    You don't know? Well, a rocket scientist would know.

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  20. #20
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Hintz View Post
    Had one a few weeks back, the agent called me and said the Bank needed to have the foundation system certified, even though I took photos of the piers, runners, tiedowns, etc and included them with my client's report. So, the agent emails me a few days later and asks if I have any interest in becoming a structural engineer, then proceeds to tell me that this elderly couple in their seventies show up at the property to certify the foundation system and Grannie puts on the ol' kneepads and goes into the crawlspace and takes a few photos and comes out 5 minutes later while Gramps wandered around the outside perimeter with his hands in his pockets, gave them a bill for $325 and a one page description with their findings that had a fancy little notary stamp with Gramps SE license number and initials on it and drove off.... My description was way more thorough and I had more photos, but I don't have that fancy little stamp. Regardless, the bank was satisfied and the deal closed. I wonder how some people sleep at night or look at themselves in a mirror.
    Jim:
    I had a call a couple of weeks ago from a credit union that had a member wanting to do a refinance on a manufactured home, less than 10 years old using a FHA backed loan and needed the foundation inspected as the Township did not inspected the foundation as part of the original installation/C of O inspection. Even though I am over 60 miles from the site, I was the closest home inspector on the FHA "list of inspectors" which I made 8 months ago and this was my first call, I decided to respond. (Not much else currently happening here in Northern Michigan!!!!!)
    I sent for the 3/4" thick HUD Permanent Foundations Guide for Manufactured Housing and proceeded to dig into the detailed guidelines, details, load tables etc. (I happen to be a registered architect and from my recall of of my structural courses 40 years ago in college, I felt comfortable understanding the basic principles they were trying to get at which is, in addition to the basic weight bearing principles transferring loads to the ground, more extensive calculations are required in terms of having a foundation of adequate mass, including soil bury weight with the basic structure adequately anchored to this foundation.)
    Additionally, the manual, has the requirement for the manufacturer of the unit to complete a worksheet indicating how their "super-structure" transmits wind and gravity loads down to the structure with special attention to the "marriage wall" with multi-width units with specific loads at the edges of large openings in this wall.
    After receipt of this worksheet from the manufacturer, the 22 page Design Worksheet needs to be completed with data entered following the various sections of the Handbook.
    Despite working with the contractor/dealer of the manufactured home for the past week, trying to get the Manufacturers Worksheet, I did my inspection yesterday (spent well over an hour in the crawl space. Maybe in a few more years when I am in my seventies, I will be as fast as granny!!!
    What I found was a nice neat installation on a 8" poured concrete perimeter foundation wall, 4' high off a continuous footing. The carriage beams were supported off 6" masonry blocks, dry stacked off the edge of the edge of the footing and five 8" steel girder beams were placed transverse to the carriage beams, neatly resting on pockets cut into concrete walls at each end and bearing on a 16 x 16 masonry block pier off 32" sq footings at center span, under the marriage wall.
    So basically, without going the next step with the calculations, it appeared that the foundation would most likely meet the requirements for gravity loads, except for 3 center piers being 1'-4" and 2'-1" from the outside point bearing points of the two large adjacent openings in the marriage walls and 5'-6" off the center bearing point between these openings!!!
    From a Vertical Anchorage (Av) standpoint: the frame of the house, was directly set on the top of the foundation wall, over a 1/8" foam strip, without any anchor bolts. The girder beams were bearing on the pockets in the wall without any attachment with center bearing on the dry stacked blocks without any anchorage, except possibly some adhesive between the wood shims! (Darn, I forgot to check!!!)
    The only attempt to tie the unit to the support were 3/16" cable ties wrapped around the girder and carriage beams at 5 locations, at each ends of the two outside cross beams and 1 wrap at the center of the center beam. Furthermore, when I pulled on these ties, I could with one finger, easily create over an inch of gap in these cable below the support beam.
    On the way back, I stopped at the Contractor/Dealers office to see if they had the Worksheet back from the Manufacturer. (She checked her fax as it was to be faxed earlier but it wasn't there yet and the guy was out to lunch when she called back!!! She said she would follow-up and have it to me this afternoon. Still haven't seen it.)
    When I outlined my findings, here only comments were, "the masons are supposed to mortar in the ends of the beams into the wall pockets" and "if the wind blows enough to move the structure at the loose ties, there are going to be major damage anyway".
    I then left, stopped at the Credit Union to discuss my findings with them.
    I am curious if anyone has had similar experience with these HUD foundation requirements and if in general, are FHA listed inspectors finding much activity for inspections?
    Would appreciate any feedback except for the obvious liability comments that I know I may be subjecting myself to.

    Gary Bottomley
    Cadillac, Michigan

  21. #21
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Gary Bottomley

    I read your comment/reply to the original post; I also commented earlier.
    Most (all) states require a foundation certificate to be issued from a Licensed Engineer. The manual you are refering to is for new construction (manufactured homes being newly installed). Typically, existing manufactured homes have to meet the intent of this manual. I believe this includes: soil bearing capacity, frost line protection for the footings, laterial loads and uplift loads (along with anchoring). I work with/for a national engineering firm and do the inspection/field work for them; and then they evaluate the system to see if it meets the intent of the HUD manual. If it does meet the intent, they (Lic. Eng.) issue a foundation certificate; if not they recommend solutions, etc.

    Jamie R Wilks
    Virginia Certified Home Inspector

  22. #22
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by jamie wilks View Post
    Gary Bottomley

    I read your comment/reply to the original post; I also commented earlier.
    Most (all) states require a foundation certificate to be issued from a Licensed Engineer. The manual you are refering to is for new construction (manufactured homes being newly installed). Typically, existing manufactured homes have to meet the intent of this manual. I believe this includes: soil bearing capacity, frost line protection for the footings, laterial loads and uplift loads (along with anchoring). I work with/for a national engineering firm and do the inspection/field work for them; and then they evaluate the system to see if it meets the intent of the HUD manual. If it does meet the intent, they (Lic. Eng.) issue a foundation certificate; if not they recommend solutions, etc.
    Thanks Jamie:
    I appreciate your input.
    At this point, after my discussions with the Credit Union, my client, they are going to discuss this further with their underwriter to see if they have any more specific requirements in this situation.
    If I ever receive more input from the manufacturer, I have indicated I would work with them to see what their engineer would recommend to improve this situation so the unit could qualify for the financing they are seeking.
    Hopefully the contractor/dealer will participate in this solution as they have a viable presence in the community and hopefully want to continue that position.

    Gary Bottomley
    Cadillac, Michigan

  23. #23
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    The main thing that you need to remember is that manufactured homes are built to a diferent code than site built homes. Manufactured homes are built to the HUD Standards, and have some diferent requirements. Such as the water heater pressure relief valve is required by the HUD standards to be terminated in the under floor crawlspace area. Also plumbing vents through the roof, only need to extend 2 inches past the roof sheathing. They also alow plumbing auto vents to be installed. You will also find that most manufactured homes are not required to be secured to their foundations.


  24. #24
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight West View Post
    T. You will also find that most manufactured homes are not required to be secured to their foundations.
    Dwight:
    What jurisdiction allows these structures to not be secured to their foundations?
    I am looking at the 2003 IRC where Appendix E covers Manufactured Housing.
    Section AE601requires footings and foundations to be constructed similar to site built homes with provisions of Chapter 4 of the code.
    Section AE604 covers Anchorage Installations with Ground Anchors where soil conditions are acceptable or Section AE605 reads: "Wood floor support systems shall be fixed to perimeter foundation walls..."

    Gary Bottomley
    Cadillac, Michigan

  25. #25
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Gary,
    As stated earlier, manufactured housing construction and installation is regulated by the HUD Standards and Regulations. This was started back in June of 1976. This was to allow manufacturers to ship there homes into neigboring states without having to conform to state, county, or local codes. The HUD Standards and Regulations where specific, supercede any jurisdiction requirement. HUD requires all manufacturers to have their construction drawings and installation manuals certified by 3rd party engineering firms. This is how they get around having to hire licensed electrical, plumbing, and mechanical contractors. The installation of the homes are then required to be done per their approved manuals. Since manufactured homes are not considered perminate installations by HUD's definition. Most of the homes if installed in a standard wind zone area based on HUD's map, and the height between the ground and bottom of metal frame does not exceed 24", will not normaly be required by the manufacturer to be tied down. That is how it is in Oregon with our 9 manufacturers.
    The only time the IRC requirements stated in Appendix E would be required is if the home was moved and being re-installed as a secondary set, and there is no local or state requirement as to the installation of the home.


  26. #26
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Bottomley View Post
    Dwight:
    What jurisdiction allows these structures to not be secured to their foundations?
    I am looking at the 2003 IRC where Appendix E covers Manufactured Housing.
    Section AE601requires footings and foundations to be constructed similar to site built homes with provisions of Chapter 4 of the code.
    Section AE604 covers Anchorage Installations with Ground Anchors where soil conditions are acceptable or Section AE605 reads: "Wood floor support systems shall be fixed to perimeter foundation walls..."
    I have never seen a manufactured home secured to the foundation (which is normally piers) in NC. They are required to be anchored to the ground per the manufactures instructions....chassis only or chassis and over the top.


  27. #27
    James Duffin's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight West View Post
    Gary,
    As stated earlier, manufactured housing construction and installation is regulated by the HUD Standards and Regulations. This was started back in June of 1976. This was to allow manufacturers to ship there homes into neigboring states without having to conform to state, county, or local codes. The HUD Standards and Regulations where specific, supercede any jurisdiction requirement. HUD requires all manufacturers to have their construction drawings and installation manuals certified by 3rd party engineering firms. This is how they get around having to hire licensed electrical, plumbing, and mechanical contractors. The installation of the homes are then required to be done per their approved manuals. Since manufactured homes are not considered perminate installations by HUD's definition. Most of the homes if installed in a standard wind zone area based on HUD's map, and the height between the ground and bottom of metal frame does not exceed 24", will not normaly be required by the manufacturer to be tied down. That is how it is in Oregon with our 9 manufacturers.
    The only time the IRC requirements stated in Appendix E would be required is if the home was moved and being re-installed as a secondary set, and there is no local or state requirement as to the installation of the home.
    The problem I have run into is that the 3rd party engineering firm doing the certification may be licensed in the state it was built but not in the state the home was moved to. If you see a home built in one state and installed in another state the 3rd party certification may or may not be valid.


  28. #28
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Bottomley View Post

    I am curious if anyone has had similar experience with these HUD foundation requirements and if in general, are FHA listed inspectors finding much activity for inspections?
    Would appreciate any feedback except for the obvious liability comments that I know I may be subjecting myself to.
    Gary, check out this website:

    Welcome to Hayman Residential Engineering Services Inc.

    This guy has built a business handling these inspections. He's a licensed engineer, carries the insurance, and issues the certificate. All the inspector has to do is collect a check or credit card info from the client, take a few photos, fill out a simple one page form, send it all in to Hayman, and sit back and wait for your check to come in. I've done a few for them. It seems pretty safe, and it's definitely easy money.


  29. #29
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    Smile Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Chambers View Post
    Gary, check out this website:

    Welcome to Hayman Residential Engineering Services Inc.

    This guy has built a business handling these inspections. He's a licensed engineer, carries the insurance, and issues the certificate. All the inspector has to do is collect a check or credit card info from the client, take a few photos, fill out a simple one page form, send it all in to Hayman, and sit back and wait for your check to come in. I've done a few for them. It seems pretty safe, and it's definitely easy money.
    Thanks Michael:
    I will be pursuing this further with this company.

    Gary Bottomley
    Cadillac, Michigan

  30. #30
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    Default Re: What's unique to inspecting manufactured homes

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Chambers View Post
    Gary, check out this website:

    Welcome to Hayman Residential Engineering Services Inc.

    This guy has built a business handling these inspections. He's a licensed engineer, carries the insurance, and issues the certificate. All the inspector has to do is collect a check or credit card info from the client, take a few photos, fill out a simple one page form, send it all in to Hayman, and sit back and wait for your check to come in. I've done a few for them. It seems pretty safe, and it's definitely easy money.
    I have done several where the lender guarantees the payment to Hayman at closing. I think it cost $495 for payment at closing and $395 with CC or check at time of inspection. Pretty darn simple process.

    Scott Patterson, ACI
    Spring Hill, TN
    www.traceinspections.com

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